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Cultivar Name

Status Probable parent 1 Probable parent 2 Cultivar Group Publication source General Notes
(source: where found/ raiser)
'A. T. Johnson' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Yeo, 1985 Originally published by Ingwersen, 1946 as G. endressii 'A.T. Johnson's var.'.  Raised by A. T. Johnson, before 1937, as a selected garden hybrid.  
'A. T. Johnson's var.' Rejected name G. endressii Ingwersen, 1946 New diagnosis of species and correction of name form (Art. 17.9)  See G. x oxonianum 'A. T. Johnson'.
'Aaltiena' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A garden seedling found by Lolke de Jong in Drachten, Netherlands, and named after his wife.  Described as "having white flowers with pink veins.  The green leaves have brown spots on them.  Height to 40cms."
'ABPP' USPP Accepted name G. 'Westray' USPP, 2012 US Plant Patent 20809 issued 2/3/2010, with notes: "Geranium `ABPP` was discovered by the inventor in 2003, as a naturally occurring whole plant mutation of an individual plant of Geranium `Westray`and was found growing within a commercial crop of Geranium `Westray` at the inventor's nursery in Naaldwijk, The Netherlands. `ABPP` is characterized by dense habit, dark green divided leaves, and flowers that are borne on short stems and are arranged closer to the foliage canopy than is typical of the parent or species. The small, profuse flowers are intense deep pink in color. `ABPP` blooms in spring, from March to late June and sporadically through summer. Cultural requirements include full sun, well-draining soil, and moderate water. `ABPP` is hardy in USDA Zone 6. The closest comparison plant known to the inventor is the parent variety, Geranium `Westray`. The new Geranium variety named `ABPP` is mostly distinguishable from the parent by leaf size and by leaf and flower stem length. The leaves of `ABPP` are approximately half the length and width of the leaves of `Westray`. The petioles of `ABPP` are approximately 4 cm in length, whereas the petioles of `Westray` can extend to 10 cm in length. The peduncles of `ABPP` are approximately 3 cm in length, whereas the peduncles of `Westray` can extend to 20 cm in length. In combination, these characteristics of smaller leaf size and leaf and flower stem lengths confer a significantly more compact plant habit of `ABPP` compared with `Westray`."  The raiser was Wim van Marrewijk, the Netherlands.  Being marketed under the name G. CRYSTAL ROSE
'Advendo' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 Described as having "mid-green leaves; large flowers of reddish lilac.  18x20".
'Afrodite' Accepted name G. sylvaticum RHS Geranium Trials, Stage 3, 2007 A plant submitted to the RHS Stage 3 Trials by Tommy Tønsberg.  Described as being "Dome-shaped, 60-80 cms, flowers over and in foliage.  Leaves yellow-green (greener than 146B). Stem green  Pubescence covered with moderate length, patent gland-tipped hairs in inflorescence, eglandular, adpressed on lower portion of stem.  Flowers to 30 mm diameter, very pale pink (69D)."   A Nomenclatural Standard WSY0096237 is lodged with the RHS Herbarium.
'Akaton' Rejected name G. pratense var. striatum Incorrect form of G. 'Striatum Akaton': see that name.
'Alan Bloom' USPP Accepted name G. sanguineum USPP, 1994 An open-pollinated seedling of G. 'Shepherd's Warning' raised by Blooms of Bressingham and named for their founder Alan Bloom on his 85th birthday.  US Plant Patent 9006 issued December 6th, 1994, describing it as having "..pink blossoms and is characterized by prolific flowering, excellent vigour and the same flowering habit as the species.  Size 30 x 40 cms, mounded. Flowers flat, saucer-shaped, 3 cms in diameter, upper surface red group 55A, veins red group 53C, petal base 55C".  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights issued under grant 415 in August 1996, under the synonym 'Bloger'.
'Alan Mayes' Accepted name G. x magnificum? or G. platypetalum? Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2002 Plant obtained by Jenny Fuller of Plantsman's Preference nursery from a wholesaler; Original source unknown.  Said to have "Good clumps of broad leaves.  Blue flowers in spring to summer.  40cms tall."
'Alanah' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Yeo, 1985 The late Sir J. Gore-Booth claimed to have raised this plant in his garden at Lissadell in Northern Ireland in 1930 from a cross of G. argenteum and "a very fine form of G. subcaulescens" according to Will Ingwersen, who also thought that it was identical to G. x lindavicum 'Purpureum'.  See also that plant.
'Alan's Blue' Accepted name G. 'Kashmir White' G. saxatile x G. pratense subp. stewartianum. Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A plant from Alan Bremner, being released by Robin Moss.  Described as being "Very vigorous to 3ft, with light blue, veined flowers with a white centre, of an unusual cockade shape". 
'Alaska' Accepted name G. erianthum Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1994 A form of G. erianthum raised from seed collected in Alaska that had been given to Michael Pitkin at Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia
'Alba' Undetermined name G. asphodeloides Geraniumboekje, 2012 Name found, but no publication details.  Invalid if post 1956. 
'Alba-plena' Rejected name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Synonym of G. pratense 'Plenum Album'
'Albiflorum' Rejected name G. pratense Botanical forma of G. pratense, not a cultivar.
'Albiflorum' Rejected name G. sylvaticum A botanical forma, not a cultivar.
'Alboroseum' Rejected name G. pratense "Plant Finder", 1997 Latin form created after 1959, in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  No replacement name assigned.
'Alboroseum' Rejected name G. phaeum An invalid latinate form.  No replacement name assigned.
'Album' Accepted name G. cinereum Yeo, 1985 Originally published as var. album by Ingwersen, 1946. Described by Yeo as having "..completely white flowers'.
'Album' Undetermined name G. dalmaticum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1956 Originated at Blooms nursery in the early 1950's, but the precise year is unknown.
'Album' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum "The Genus Geranium", Ingwersen, 1946 This is the plant collected by Walter Ingwersen in the Rhodope Mountains, Bulgaria, prior to the second world war.  It was described by him as having "inch-wide, snow-white flowers".  At the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials Stage 3 2004-6 its AGM was re-confirmed. 
'Album' Accepted name G. maculatum Clifton, 1979 Originally published as var. album by RHS Dictionary, 1956.  
'Album' Undetermined name G. phaeum var. phaeum Yeo, 1985 Originally published as var. album by Ingwersen, 1946.  Wild origin, collected by Dr Roger-Smith and Miss Savory in Switzerland, on an AGS trip in 1940.    NB The epithet 'Alba'/ 'Album' is currently under investigation due to its duplication of use within the Denomination Class.
'Album' Accepted name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Originally published as var. album by Ingwersen 1946.  This plant received an Award of Merit in RS Trials in 1976 and falls within the widely defined white petalled group f. albiflorum Ortiz.  Described as being "..a tall plant up to 4 feet, with large, single, glistening white flowers, green veins and green stigma".  
'Album' Accepted name G. robertianum Clifton, 1979 Originally published as var. album by Ingwersen, 1946.  Of unknown wild origin. 
'Album' Accepted name G. sanguineum Clifton, 1979 Originally published as var. album by Ingwersen, 1946,.  Probably of garden origin.  Reconfirmed as a RHS AGM at the Rock Garden Trial 2004-2006.  Described as "Flower pure white, dimensions 45cms x 100cms, flowering late-May to early July."  
'Album' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Clifton, 1979 Originally published as var. album, Ingwersen, 1946.  Collected in the wild in Northern Sweden by Walter Ingwersen. 
'Album' Rejected name G. balcanum G. balcanum is nom. hort. and, thus, not a valid species.  It probably refers to G. macrorrhizum. 
'Album' Rejected name G. endressii Latin form created after 1959  in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.    See G. 'Mary Mottram'
'Album' Rejected name G. erianthum Vaste plante, Holland, 1997? Latin form created after 1959  in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  No replacement name assigned.
'Album' Rejected name G. eriostemon GGN 66, 1997 G. eriostemon is a synonym of G. platyanthum. See G. platyanthum 'Album'.
'Album' Rejected name G. nepalense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.
'Album' Rejected name G. platyanthum var reinii Vaste plante, Holland, 1997? Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  See G. 'Ankum's White'.
'Album' Rejected name G. rectum Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code. See G. 'Kashmir White' . 
'Album' Rejected name G. rivulare Hannays of Bath, UK, 19?? Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  In collection of Gert Lambrecht, having been obtained from Hannay's of Bath.  No replacement name assigned.
'Album' Rejected name G. versicolor Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  See G. 'Snow White'.
'Album' Undetermined name G. farreri Name found in Readers Digest Encyclopaedia, 1985, but no description.  Invalid if post 1956. NB The epithet 'Alba'/ 'Album' is currently under investigation due to its duplication of use within the Denomination Class.
'Album' Undetermined name G. platypetalum Name found, but no publication details.  Invalid if post 1956.  NB The epithet 'Alba'/ 'Album' is currently under investigation due to its duplication of use within the Denomination Class.
'Album Plenum' Rejected name G. pratense Invalid form of G. pratense 'Plenum Album'.
'Album Plenum' Undetermined name G. sylvaticum Name found, but no publication details.  Invalid if post 1956.
'Album Veitshchheim' Rejected name G. dalmaticum Latin form created after 1959, in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code. See G. 'Kashmir White' .
'Alec's Pink' Accepted name G. phaeum LW Plants, UK, 2000 A seedling found by Alec Anderson and named after him by the nursery distributing the plant, LW Plants of Harpenden, Herts, UK.  Described as having "..pink flowers and being a strong grower to a height of 75cms".
'Alf' Accepted name G. pylzowianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being similar to the species, but with lilac-coloured flowers.
'Algera Double' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as having "Semi-double White flowers with a purple centre, during June-July.  Sometimes flowering again in August-September.  Height to 40 cms."
'Aliance' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "A nice G. pratense with rather small, soft blue flowers, strongly veined darker blue."
'Alice' CPVO, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group "New & Unusual Plants", v4:1, 1998 Bred by Carl & Janette Lowe of Border Alpines.  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights Grant number 17466 made 22/5/2006.  Canadian PBR grant 3979 13/12/2010.  Described as "Strong growing variety with large pale lilac pink flowers and silver green foliage".
'Alice Hunt' Undetermined name G. phaeum       Found a few years ago in a Gloucestershire garden by the National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss and described by the seller as having "sprays of medium flowers, petals lilac with darker edge and white centre. To 18 ins tall." Published description not found.
'Alicelo' USPP Accepted name G. cinereum USPP, 2012 From Carl Lowe, UK, a chance seedling. US Plant Patent 18351 issued 25/12/2007, with comments: "characterized by its upright, broadly spreading and compact plant habit; numerous pink-colored flowers with purple venation; and long flowering period; compared to plants of the cultivar ‘Carol’ plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of ‘Carol' in flower color as plants of the cultivar 'Carol' had purple-colored flowers.”  While it is not explicit, there is a reference to the CPVO registration of 'Alice' on the USPP, suggesting that the two might be synonymous
'Alien's Gift' Accepted name G. soboliferum 'Starman' seedling "Garten Praxis", 12/1999 p 14 A seedling selected by nurseryman Rolf Offenthal of Grethem, Germany, from his G. soboliferum 'Starman'.  The dark marks in the normal G. soboliferum flower are much more pronounced in this plant, forming an asterisk shape.  The plant is also different in its flowering time, which starts  at the end of June.  Height 30 - 40 cms.  Flower diameter 4 - 4.5 cms.  Flower colour deep pink with large purple flecks.
'All Saints' Accepted name G. phaeum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1996 A selection from seedlings by Margaret Nimmo-Smith for Monksilver Nursery.  Pale lavender-pink flowers.
'Alpen Glow' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Alpenglow'.
'Alpenglow' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 From the Alpenglow Nursery, Canada.  Dark green foliage, rose magenta flowers, more compact than normal species.  12 x 15"
'Alpine Glow' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name. See G. 'Alpenglow'.
'Alpinum' Rejected name G. grandiflorum Ingwersen, 1946 Synonym of G. himalayense 'Gravetye'
'Alpinum Blatow' Rejected name G. himalayense Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  A plant sold by Pieter Zwijnenebug, Boskoop, but now lost.  Originally given to them by a customer. No replacement name assigned.
'Amanda' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Cyril Foster of Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as having "..very small cerise-pink flowers.  Very low-growing."
'Amanda's Blush' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'Amy Doncaster' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Washfield Nursery, UK, 1989 A seedling that arose in the garden of Mrs Amy Doncaster.  Dark true-blue flowers with a large white eye.
'Andrew Clarke' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Clifton, 1979 Arose in the garden of ARM Clarke and Cambridge BG.  Described by Clifton as having "..flowers that are bright pink, opering flat and held well above the leaves, about 1.5 inches across; a prolific flowerer"
'Andy's Star' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Release 2 A plant raised by David Browne of Coombland Gardens, UK, and being introduced by David Howard of Howard Nurseries, Norfolk.  Named after the son of the raiser.  Described as being "..an aberrant flowered form of this prolific nothovar in that the flowers appear almost pure white.  In all other respects, the plant is typical of the type, but is only of medium height and appears reasonably compact".
'Angelina' Accepted name G. phaeum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 A plant collected by Angelina Petrisevac from Buzet on the Wojwodina plain in Eastern  Croatia.  Described as having "dark green leaves with marbling, with aubergine-red flowers".
'Anglicum' Rejected name G. x monacense Nothovar epithet, not a cultivar name.  
'Angulatum' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Yeo, 1985 Originally published as G. angulatum in Curtis' Botanical, 1792, and subsequently known as G. sylvaticum var. angulatum.  Similar to G. sylvaticum 'Wanneri', but larger petals and angled stems.
'Ankum' Accepted name G. platyanthum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant that came from the nursery of Coen Jansen in the Netherlands.  Whilst it was not intended that the plant should be marketed, it found its way into cultivation via members of the Dutch Pelargonium & Geranium Club.  Described as being "some 60 cms tall with very pale lilac-pink flowers with purple veins.  A nice plant all the same."
'Ankum's Pride' Accepted name G. sanguineum Coen Jansen, Vaste Planten, Holland, 1990 Raised by Coen Jansen, Dalfsen, Netherlands, 1988, as a seedling from G.  'Jubilee Pink'.  Named after his village.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Spreading, rhizomatous perennial 20 x 70cm in trial. Rosette leaves few, soon disappearing. Stem leaves c30 x 40mm, mid green (137B/C) evenly covered with short, white hairs becoming longer on the underside, divided almost to the base into 5 or 7, often truncate at the base; divisions clearly distinct, cuneate, widest near the apex, revolute, acute with 1 or 2 lobes, lobes lanceolate lacking teeth with a tiny, acute tip. Stems prostrate, green flushed reddish-brown on exposed sides, evenly covered with patent, eglandular hairs of varying lengths. Flowers borne in pairs or singly on long peduncle to 70mm or more, pedicels to 25mm. Sepals elliptic-ovate, 9   4mm with long white hairs along the veins, mucro to 1.5mm. Flowers 35mm across, purplish pink (66C), finely veined bluish purple (81A); petals broad obovate, to 20 x 17mm, crimped and faintly notched at the apex."
'Ankum's White' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Coen Jansen Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 A cultivar that is said to be a distinct improvement on G. 'Trevor's White' which often has traces of pink in its flowers.  Sent by Monksilver nursery to the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Stage 2 Trials in 2003-5 where it was awarded an AGM.  Described as "Spreading, rhizomatous perennial 20   70cm in trial. Rosette leaves few, soon disappearing. Stem leaves c30   40mm, mid green (137B/C) evenly covered with short, white hairs becoming longer on the underside, divided almost to the base into 5 or 7, often truncate at the base;  divisions clearly distinct, cuneate, widest near the apex, revolute, acute with 1 or 2 lobes, lobes lanceolate, lacking teeth with a tiny, acute tip. Stems prostrate, green flushed reddish-brown on exposed sides, evenly covered with patent, eglandular hairs of varying lengths. Flowers borne in pairs or singly on long peduncle to 70mm or more, pedicels to 25mm. Sepals elliptic-ovate, 9   4mm with long white hairs along the veins, mucro to 1.5mm. Flowers 35mm across, purplish pink (66C), finely veined bluish purple (81A); petals broad obovate, to 20 17mm, crimped and faintly notched at the apex."
'Anmore' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1993? Raised by Mrs Phoebe Noble, in Vancouver, Canada.  Described as having "lustrous silver-pink flowers with very pale green foliage".
'Ann Doncaster' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Gärternerei Simon, 1997 Wrong forename.  See G. 'Amy Doncaster'.  
'Ann Folkard' Accepted name G. procurrens G. psilostemon Journal RHS, XCIX,1974, p316 fig. 145 Raised Rev. O. Folkard, 1973, from G. procurrens seed.  Reconfirmed as a RHS AGM at the Rock Garden Trial 2004-2006.
'Ann Foulkard' Rejected name A misspelt version of 'Ann Folkard' found on the Zipcodezoo.com web site.
'Ann Logan' Undetermined name G. phaeum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Named by Robin Moss for his daughter's Godmother. No description given
'Anne' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Named by Rein ten Klooster after Anne Berrevoets in whose garden it was found, in Breda, Netherlands.  Described as having "Large, pale white flowers and of height 60 cms.  Possible a hybrid between G. phaeum 'Album' and G. phaeum var. lividum."
'Anne Claire' Accepted name G. phaeum de Bloemenhoek Nursery, Holland, 1998 A seedling found in the garden of Mrs Erna Berg from Zouterwoude, in Holland.  Described as being "a normal G. phaeum type, but with yellow leaves, almost white in their centre".
'Anne Haunch' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A cultivar raised by nurseryman Jim Haunch and named after his wife.  Described as being "…A double flowered cultivar of five petals with five inner petals notched on the right side, silvery-pink colour with dark pink veining."  No published description ever found and the nursery has now closed.
'Anne Marie' Undetermined name G. phaeum A seedling from the garden of Mrs Erna Berg of Zouterwoude, Holland.  Thought to be similar to G. phaeum 'Lisa', but no description found.  See "The Plantsman", Vol. 6 Part 3, p160, 2007
'Anne-Marie' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Being offered by European nurseries, notably J Spruyt Vaste Planten, Belgium.  A similar plant to G. 'Claridge Druce'.  No published description found.
'Anne Stevens' Accepted name G. x monacense Geranium Register, Release 3 A plant from Trevor Bath and in Andrew Norton's National Collection.  It is named after Anne Stevens, of Anstey, Dorset.  It is described as "identical to G. 'Mrs Charles Perrin' but distinctive in that it has no veining.  Long flowering."
'Anne Thompson' Rejected name G. procurrens x G. psilostemon Misspelt: See G. 'Anne Thomson'. 
'Anne Thomson' Accepted name G. procurrens G. psilostemon GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by A. Bremner and named by him after Mrs Anne Thomson.    RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Spreading perennial to 150   165cm (with support) in trial. Basal leaf blades to c100   120mm borne on long petioles to c300mm, with short, white hairs concentrated around the veins on the underside, yellow-green (N146A), unblotched, rather circular in outline, divided into 7 to about two thirds; divisions widest towards the apex, not overlapping, heavily lobed to about one third; lobes triangular with a small acute tip, teeth irregular to absent. Stem leaves in pairs, divided into 3 or 5 with jagged lobes, remaining fairly large to the apex. Stems with patent, gland-tipped hairs, sprawling or scrambling. Flowers profuse, borne in pairs from leaf axils along upper part of stem. Sepals narrowly ovate, glandular hairy, mucro to 3mm. Flowers to 40mm across, vivid red-purple (midway between 74A and 78A) with black veins from about midway becoming suffused to form a black eye; petals broad obovate, to 20   15mm, apex rounded, truncate or weakly notched."
'Annie' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2003 A seedling found in the garden of Mr G. W. Rogers of Lytham St. Annes and thought to have arisen from G. 'Walter's Gift'.  Described as having "..leaves more heavily marked chocolate brown than G. 'Walter's Gift' and more marked in semi-shade, with flowers of a very pale silvery pink, having a similar shape to those of G. versicolor.  Height 18 ins with typical G.x oxonianum habit".  Named after Mr Rogers mother.
'Ant Chilly' Accepted name see notes     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A plant raised by Belgian hybridiser Jos Vandeweijer. A seedling of G. 'Chantilly' from where it gets its anagram based name. Appearing white flowered from a distance, but in reality very pale pink, with reddish veins to half the length of the petals. Similar to G. 'Karen Wouters', but with yellow-green foliage, rather than green.
'Antoine' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2005 A selection from the wild G. pratense border maintained by Geert Lambrecht in his garden at Mariloop in Belgium.  He describes the flower as being '..a beautiful dark blue with black veins'.  The plant is named after his father.
'Anton Bruckner' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. sylvaticum? HGG Newsletter, Spring 1999 From Christian Kress, Sarastro Nursery, Austria.  Found in botanical garden Linz/ upper Austria 1995.  Light pink flowers, 2.0 - 2.5 cms diameter, larger than those of G. 'Amy Doncaster', not veined.
'Apfelblte' Accepted name G. sanguineum Ernst Pagels Nursery, Germany, 1985? A selection of G. sanguineum 'Splendens' made by Ernst Pagels (breeder of famous Salvia's such as 'Ostfriesland') in the early 1980's. Described as "a standard G. sanguineum, with white flowers with a very faint flush of pink overlaid and petals that overlap each other."
'Appeltern Glory' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Found in gardens in Appeltern, Netherlands and named by Arno Heijkamp.  Described as having "White flowers, with a clear pink blush.  Flowering June - August."
'Apple Blossom' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1969 Raised by Alan Bloom, prior to 1971.  Originally described as a G. cinereum cultivar.
'Appleblossom' Rejected name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Translation from German in breach of Article 28.1 of the Cultivated Code.  See G. 'Apfelblüte'.
'Ardicy' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum G. asphodeloides International Stauden Union Registration A plant in the French national collection.  Originally raised by Dr Hans Simon, in Germany.
'Aria' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G. rubifolium Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994, supp list Raised by Alan Bremner.  Small pink flowers.
'Armitage' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Misspelt:  See G. 'Armitageae'
'Armitageae' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Yeo, 1985 Originally published as G. endressii var. armitageae Turrill in 1932.  Raised by Miss E. Armitage, Dadnor Garden, Herefordshire.  
'Arnoldshof' Undetermined name Geranium submitted to RHS Stage 3 Trials by Inez Arnold.  Nothing further known.
'Arthur Johnson' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of G. 'A. T. Johnson'
'Artistry' Accepted name G. cinereum group hybrid Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1978 Raised by Alan Bloom, 1978.
'Aureum' Rejected name G. phaeum Latin form created after 1959, in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code. See G. 'Golden Spring'. 
'Aussie Gem' Accepted name Geranium Register, release 3 Raised by Isobel Shipton at her Australian nursery.  Described as having "white flowers, with violet veining.  Petals separated.  20cms tall, 30cms wide.  Flowering June to September."
'Aviemore' Accepted name G. sanguineum Inshriarch Nursery, UK, 1985? Raised by Jack Drake and marketed widely in Germany, by Hans Simon and others.   See also  G. 'Inverness'.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Spreading, rhizomatous perennial 30 x 110cm in trial. Rosette leaves few, soon disappearing. Stem leaves paired c40 x 45mm, mid green (137A) sparsely covered with short, adpressed hairs, longer but confined to the veins on the underside, divided almost to the base into 5 or 7; divisions clearly distinct, cuneate, widest near the apex, revolute, acute, usually with 2 lobes; lobes lanceolate,lacking teeth with a minute, acute tip. Stems prostrate, green, flushed reddish brown with a light covering of long, fairly coarse, patent hairs. Flowers borne singly or in pairs on peduncle to c50mm; pedicels to c25mm. Sepals elliptic-ovate, 9 x 3mm with long white hairs along the veins; mucro to 2mm. Flowers 40mm across, purplish-pink (74A/B), lightly veined reddish-purple (61A); petals obcordate, to 20 x 10mm, crimped with deep, v-shaped notch at the apex.
'Aya' Accepted name G. traversii G. procurrens Sarastro Nurser, Austria, 2000 A hybrid by Allan Robinson at Wisley Gardens and named for a colleague. Intermediate between the parents.
'Azure Rush' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum  G. 'Gerwat' USPP, 2012 US Plant Patent issued 24/4/2012, with the following notes:  "Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the parent, `Rozanne`, in flower color as plants of `Rozanne` have violet blue-colored flowers with white-colored centers and purple violet-colored venation. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium wallichianum `Buxton's Blue`. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Bressingham, United Kingdom, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Buxton's Blue` in flower color as plants of `Buxton's Blue` had light pale blue-colored flowers with white-colored centers."  Application to CPVO withdrawn.
'Azurro' Accepted name G. wallichianum G. 'Buxton's Variety' Grootes Allplant catalogue, Holland, 2012 A hybrid raised by Marco van Noort in the Netherlands.  A very vigorous hybrid of the two forms of G. wallichianum, with flowers that look similar to G. 'Buxton's Variety', with good veins on both the front and the back.   Was offered for CPVO rights but withdrawn.
'Babe' Accepted name G. psilostemon 'Bressingham Flair' G. psilostemon "Garten Praxis", 7/1999 p 18 Developed by Nurseryman Rolf Offenthal of Grethem, Germany, by pollinating G. 'Bressingham Flair' with G. psilostemon pollen.  His single seedling proved to be a low growing new form of G. psilostemon, half the height of G. 'Nicola', and flowering for an extended period from the start of June to the end of July.  Height 40-50cms.  Flower diameter 3 - 3.5 cms and colour magenta red, with large black basal markings.
'Baby Blue' Accepted name G. himalayense Hibberd, 1994 Originally raised by Ingwersen's Nursery, but possibly introduced by Axletree Nursery ca. 1994.  Short plants only growing to 30cms tall, with very large flowers up to 6 cms in diameter.
'Baker's Pink' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Corsley Mill Nursery, UK , 1988 Collected near Wengen in the Swiss alps by the late  AWA 'Bill' Baker.  Discussed in Yeo under G. sylvaticum forma roseum Murray.
'Balansae' Undetermined name A name on the Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'Ballerina' Accepted name G. cinereum group hybrid Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1963 Raised by Alan Bloom, 1961 initially described as a G. cinereum cultivar. Entered by several into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trials, 2004-6, where its previous award of an AGM was re-confirmed.  Described as "Semi-evergreen plant with small, low, mid-green 137C foliage. Flowering from 10 May to 29 July. Flowers are 3cm in diameter; pale-purple 74D, veined dark purplish-red 71A; anthers black." 
'Bamsley' Rejected name G. sanguineum Misspelt:  See G. 'Barnsley'.
'Bangert' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant found by Jan Neelen, a Dutch nurseryman, at his first nursery in Bangert, near Hoorn, Netherlands.  Described as having "Lilac-purple flowers, with a small white circle in the centre and dark veins.  Leafs green. Height 60cms."
'Barney Brighteye' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum   HGG Newsletter, Spring 2004 Found at a small plant sale in the West of England by Shirley Bennett and described as being "30cms tall, mounded rosettes of evergreen, rounded leaves.  Flowers mauve-violet with a white eye and notched petals, produced on thin, lax stems".  Named after the finders Golden Retreiver called "Barney". 
'Barnsley' Accepted name G. sanguineum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1992 Raised as a seedling from the late Rosemary Verey's garden, by John Anton-Smith.  A conventional G. sanguineum with mid-pink flowers.
'Barrre' Accepted name G. sanguineum "L'essentiel sur les Geraniums Vivaces 1997", Evrard, 1997 Discovered in 1988 by Dr Evrard, French National Collection Holder, at BarréreNursery in France.  Originally known as G. sanguineum giant form, now named as a cultivar.  Described as having ".. Flowers of 3cms diameter, soft pink in colour.  Very unusual in being some 80cms tall".
'Barrson' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Name included in catalogue of Gärtnerei  Simon, Germany, 1997.  Description not discovered.
'Basket of Lavender' Accepted name G. phaeum 'Judith's Blue' HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 Differentiated from G. 'Judith's Blue' by having larger flowers.
'Beholder's Eye' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2003 RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Mound-forming perennial, 55 x 135cm in trial. Basal leaf blades to c70 x 85mm borne on long petioles to c200cm, dark green (147A), with an even covering of short, white, eglandular hairs, absent on the underside except at the veins, divided to four fifths into 5-7, divisions, little overlapping, widest about the middle, lobed to about halfway; lobes with regular teeth, rounded with an acute tip. Stem leaves in pairs, 3 or 5 times divided, with acute, triangular toothed lobes becoming smaller and simpler towards the apex. Stems green, red-flushed in parts especially on the pedicels covered in fairly long patent hairs. Inflorescence remaining fairly compact. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, 10 x 3mm, sparse hairs along the veins, mucro to 2mm; flowers c30mm across, deep reddish-purple (71C), veins white towards the base forming a pale eye; petals obovate, 20x  8mm with a vshaped notch at the apex."
'Beldo' Accepted name G. renardii The Plantsman, Vol. 4 Part 3, Pp172, 2005 A seldom offered plant from Holland grown at the National Plant Collection for Geranium.  Described as being "..a dark flowered cultivar with strongly wedge-shaped petals".
'Belle of Herterton' Accepted name G. sanguineum Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1995 Found by Robin Moss at Frank Lawleys garden at Herterton House, Cambo, Northumberland.  A normal G. sanguineum with mid-pink flowers.
'Ben Blanc' Accepted name G. himalayense HGG Newsletter, Spring 2006 A plant arising from G. himalayense seed and named after the eldest son of the raiser, Mrs Annette Cutts.  Described as being "A typical looking G. himalayense, height 18 inches, spread 2 - 3 feet.  Flowers 5 cms across, white with blue veins and blue stamens, thus distuingshed from G. 'Derrick Cook' which has red veins and stamens."
'Benjamin Browne' Accepted name G. collinum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2004 A garden seedling found by David Browne, owner of Coombland Gardens and named after one of his sons.  Described as "Fine cut foliage of green/grey, with a good mounding habit.  60 - 75 cms high, 60 cms across.  Flower colour pale lilac pink, with straight veins up to 2/3 of petal length.  Flower diameter 1.25 - 1.75 cms."
'Berggarten' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Axletree Nursery, UK, 1997 A continental European introduction in the mid-1990's, from Gärtnerei Simon.  Now described as being similar to other G. x cantabrigiense cultivars but with "pretty, true-pink flowers".
'Bertie Crg' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Crg strain G. papuanum Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1996 A spontaneous seedling at the Nursery, named after the Nursery Terrier.  A low growing plant (5cms tall) with a spreading habit and greenish-brown foliage.  Flowers are purplish-pink.
'Beth Chatto' Accepted name G. maculatum Vaste Planten, Netherlands, 1989 Plant raised at Beth Chatto's Unusual Plants nursery in Essex.  Name given by the Registrar in place of the invalid form G. 'Chatto's Form'.  Clear pink flowers that are larger and darker than those of G. 'Shameface'.
'Bethany' Undetermined name Entry in Marwood Hill Gardens catalouge and Plant Finder, 1997, but without any further description.
'Betty Catchpole' Accepted name G. endressii HGG Newsletter, Spring 1997 New introduction in 1996 from Catforth Gardens.  Flowers a purplish-pink (RHS 74C), dimensions 30 x 130 cms.
'Betty Ellis' Accepted name G. sanguineum GGN, 78, 2000 Given by a customer to Mrs Betty Ellis, owner of the Coton Nursery, Cambridge, in the early 1990's and named after her.  Neat mounds of slightly glossy foliage and a generous crop of intensely coloured, medium-sized flowers, that are given some elegance of form by the recurvature of the petals near the apex. 
'Bevan' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Bevan's Variety'.
'Bevan's Variety' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Clifton, 1979 Collected by Dr Roger Bevan in Yugoslavia, in 1961, with his wife, Diana. The cultivar 'Diana' is a synonym of this plant.  Initially distributed by Washfield Nursery, Kent.  Entered by Beth Chatto Gardens into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 3 2004-6 where it won an AGM.  Described as "Mat forming, compact and vigorous, 35 X 125cm wide. Leaves 12 x 14cm wide, light green. Single flowers, to 3cm, near to Red Purple N74A, petals discrete and flat. Flowering prolifically from 8.5.06 to 8.6.06, peaking in late May."
'Bicolor' Rejected name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Synonym G. pratense 'Striatum'
'Big White' Rejected name G. traversii Invalid under Article 21 G 1 as purely adjectival.  No replacement name assigned.
'Bill Baker' Undetermined name G. palustre  G. sylvaticum Included in HGG seed list, 1998.  Published description not discovered.
'Bill Palmer' Accepted name G. 'Sea Spray' seedling HGG newsletter, Spring 2010 A chance seedling found by Bill Palmer, a member of the Hardy Geranium Group and named after himself.  Described by him as being "A diminutive form of G. 'Sea Spray', with bronze foliage, forming a small mound throughout the winter; in May/June prostrate stems start to spread forming a continuous carpet of small bronze leaves dotted with small magenta/pink flowers.  Grows to a diameter of 15inches and flowers until late Autumn."
'Bill Wallace' Rejected name Misspelt:  See G. 'Bill Wallis'
'Bill Wallis' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum Bath & Jones, 1994 Garden seedling, found by the late Bill Wallis in a Buckden garden.  The plant has deep bluish-purple flowers, rather smaller than normal.
'Biocova' Rejected name G. x cantabrigiense Hillside Cottage Gardens, UK, 1997 Misspelt:  See G. 'Biokovo'.
'Biokovo' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Gärtnerei Simon, Germany, 1980 Collected at Biokovo, Yugoslavia, by Hans Simon.  The plant has a low and spreading form.  Flowers are white, often with pinkish stains and veins.
'Birch Blue' Accepted name G. pratense Ingwersen's Nursery, UK, 1957/8 Doubtful that it is still in cultivation.
'Birch Double' Rejected name G. grandiflorum Yeo, 1985 Synonym of G. himalayense 'Plenum' 
'Birch Farm Pink' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2006 A plant discovered by Robin Moss, of Hexham, Northumberland, at Ingwersen's Birch Farm Nursery and given to David Hibberd at Axletree Nursery.  It is described as a typical G. sylvaticum with white flowers, veined pink.
'Birch Lilac' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1997 Raised by Rainforest Gardens, British Columbia, Canada and said to be similar to the normal G. sylvaticum but with lilac coloured flowers.
'Birgit Lion' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Geranium register, release 3 A cultivar thought to have been raised in Germany.  Described as being "…having flowers very similar to G. 'Amy Doncaster' (i.e.clear, dark blue), perhaps slightly larger."
'Bittersweet' Accepted name G. pratense Monksilver, 1990 A selection with pale pinky mauve flowers, with paler veining and dark anthers.  Leaves are tinged with purple.
'Black and Blue' Accepted name G. ibericum   HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 A seedling raised by Robin Moss with "..the darkest blue/black flowers" he has ever seen.
BLACK BEAUTY Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Nodbeauty'.
'Black Form' Rejected name G. phaeum In breach of article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Black Ice' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. traversii var. elegans x G.  'Nigricans') GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by A. Bremner. Similar to 'Sea Spray', but with darker foliage.
'Black Satin' Undetermined name G. sessiliflorum subsp. novae-zelandiae  From Naturally Native NZ Plants Ltd., Tauranga and introduced into the USA by Monrovia Nurseries.  An extra dark form of 'Nigricans'? Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plantfinder, 2002.  Published description not found.
'Blackthorn Garnet' Undetermined name G. kishtvariense Name of plant in the Bressingham Dell garden, obtained from Blackthorn Nursery.  Published description not found.
'Blanche' Accepted name G. gracile Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 One of two forms of G. gracile commonly in cultivation and given cultivar names to distinguish between them in the mid-90's by Axletree nursery.  See also G. gracile 'Blush'
'Blanco' Rejected name G. sanguineum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Invalide, merely adjectival.
'Blauwvoet' Accepted name G. phaeum Internationale Stauden Union registration Raised by Jan Spruyt, Mostenveld, Belgium (not Germany, as previously reported).  Bright blue flowers with white showing through and more densely towards the centre of the flower.  Height 50cms.
'Bloger' CPVO Synonym G. sanguineum CPVO, 1996 A synonym of G. 'Alan Bloom'.  Subject to CPVO Plant Breeders Rights grant 415, made 15th October 1996.  However, that was after US Plant Patent grant 9006 was made on 6th December, 1994 under the name G. sanguinedum 'Alan Bloom', giving that name priority.  See G. 'Alan Bloom'.
'Blogold' CPVO; USPP Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Buxton's Variety' G. 'Ann Folkard' Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1999 A chance seedling found by Hans Kramer, de Hessenhof nursery, Holland in 1994.  CPVO licence granted under number 6099 to Hans Kramer on 2/10/2000.  US Plant Patent PP12955 granted 17th September, 2002.  See also marketing designations G. BLUE SUNRISE and VERGULD SAFFIER.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Mound-forming perennial to 40 x 110cmin trial. Basal leaf blades c80 x 100mm borne on petioles becoming long with age with sparse white hairs concentrated around the veins on the underside, yellow (151D), unblotched, divided to about four fifths into 7, divisions diamond-shaped, little overlapping, heavily lobed to about half way; lobes broad lanceolate, tapered to a sharp, dark point, teeth jagged. Stem leaves in pairs, 5-7 lobed, sharply lobed. Stems with short, white eglandular hairs. Flowers borne in pairs from leaf axils towards the end of the stems. Sepals ovateelliptic with a translucent margin, mucroto 2mm. Flowers to 40mm across, violet (88C) lightly flushed pink, veins purple (81A), older flowers becoming pinkish purple (81B/C), veined 81A; petals broadobovate 15mm, rounded, truncate or faintly notched at the apex.
'Bloody Graham' Accepted name G. sanguineum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1993 Garden seedling from Graham Stuart Thomas, 1990.  A  normal G. sanguineum with purplish-red flowers.
'Blue Bird' Undetermined name A plant purchased from Christies Elite Nursery in Scotland and said to have originated in Japan.  Described on label as having "deep blue flowers, height 30 cms, flowering 5-8".  Correspondant says that it looks like G. platypetalum.  Published description not found. 
'Blue Blood' Accepted name G. gymnocaulon G. ibericum subsp. jubatum Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 A hybrid produced by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as being "..strong growing, 60 cms tall, with rounded, purplish-blue flowers.  The green foliage often has some leaves turning orangey-red, as if Autumn has already started: hence the name, for foliage and flower colour."
'Blue Boy' Accepted name G. himalayense ?? Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant raised by Cyril Foster of Rothbury, Northumberland.  Desdribed as "A small, low-growing plant, with small flowers".  See also G. phaeum cultivar.
'Blue Boy' Rejected name G. phaeum Cultivar name already in use.  No replacement name assigned.
'Blue Chip' Accepted name G. pratense Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1990 Form with very soft blue flowers, with tinge of pink on opening and dark anthers.
'Blue Cloud' Accepted name Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Seedling found at Axletree Nursery, possibly of G. 'Nimbus'.  Entered by Hellyer's Garden Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM.  Tall, loose mounds of finely divided foliage.  Pale blue flowers with veined petals, star-shaped.
'Blue Delight' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from an unknown Dutch nursery.  Flowers pale blue shot through with pink and a white centre. Height 70 cms.  
'Blue Dove' Accepted name G. phaeum var. lividum Clifton, 1979 Plant distributed by Ingwersen's Nursery originally as G. phaeum 'Lividum', with dove blue flowers.
'Blue Eyes' Accepted name G. erianthum "Garten Praxis", 12/1999 p 13 Developed by Nurseryman Rolf Offenthal of Grethem, Germany, from mass sowings of G. erianthum.  One seedling was selected, with a darker centre than G. 'Calm Sea'.  Seeds from this plant were then selected again on the basis of a still darker eye, this time 5 plants.  After a third year of such selection a single seedling was selected, with a light blue flower with a violet eye.  Height approx. 30 cms, flower diameter 3 - 3.5 cms
'Blue Form' Rejected name  G. renardii In breach of article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Blue Ice' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Vaste Planten, Holland, 1998 Name published in catalogue with words reversed.  Correct name is G. 'Ice Blue'.
'Blue Lagoon' Undetermined name G. pratense A plant being newly marketed by Plantsman's Preference Nursery in 2008.  No published description found.
'Blue Pearl' Accepted name Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 Seedling collected from G. 'Brookside' by Axletree Nursery, 1989.  Tall, loose mounds, with bowl shaped flowers.  Flower colour an unusual mix of grey and blue-violet, with heavy veining.
'Blue Robin' Accepted name G. renardii G. platypetalum 'Turco' Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 A chance seedling from Karen Wouters Vaste Planten, Holland.  Probably the cross shown.  Described as having "Large, violet-blue flowers, with heavy purple veining and separated, notched petals.  18x24 ins".
'Blue Shadow' Accepted name G. phaeum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 1998/9 Amethyst flowers with a blue appearance, especially in shade. Height 65 cms
'Blue Sky Thinking' Accepted name G. pratense     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Raised by Robin Moss and said to be "A very tall G. pratense to 135 cms, with large, gorgeous mid-blue flowers".
'Blue Star' Accepted name G. wlassovianum Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 A widely available form of G. wlassovianum through Germany, Holland and Scandinavia.  It is close to, and may be the same as, the commonly available nursery plants elsewhere and has dark bluish-purple flowers.  NB Beeches is selling a plant called 'Blue Star' under the species G. phaeum!
BLUE SUNRISE Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Blogold'
'Blue Thunder' Accepted name G. gymnocaulon G. ibercum var. jubatum HGG newsletter, Spring 2014 A plant that has been in cultivation for some years, without a cultivar name.  It is known that the late Bill Baker made this cross and this is thought to be the plant that he produced.  It is has an intensely dark blue flower, heavily black veined.  Introduced to the trade by Robin Moss of the HGG.
'Blueberry Ice' Accepted name G. nodosum Avondale Plants, UK, 2010 Described as having "Dark, purple-blue flowers frosted with white ice on the edges of the petals".  Originally bred by Jennie Spiller of Elworthy Cottage Garden Plants, Taunton.
'Blue Haze' Accepted name G. pratense     Wildside Plants, 2007 Catalogue states "A superb cranesbill with soft yellow leaves for months in the spring. A trailing habit and lavender-blue flowers in late summer". Information from National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss.
'Blues in the Night' Accepted name G. 'Calm Sea' HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A Robin Moss selection from a group of G. 'Calm Sea' seedlings.  Described as having "..a wonderful dusky, darkish blue flower with dark blue veins."
'Blush' Accepted name G. gracile Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 One of two forms of G. gracile commonly in cultivation and given cultivar names to distinguish between them in the mid-90's by Axletree nursery.  See also G. gracile 'Blanche'
'Blushing Turtle' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. sanguineum G. x oxonianum or G. asphodeloides USPP, 2011 US Plant Patent 22376 issued 20/12/2011 to Karin Kosick of Nanoose Bay, Canada, with the following information:  "Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium sanguineum `John Elsley`. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Nanoose Bay, British Columbia, Canada, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `John Elsley` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new Geranium were larger than plants of `John Elsley`. 2. Plants of the new Geranium had larger leaves than plants of `John Elsley`. 3. Plants of the new Geranium and `John Elsley` differed in flower color as plants of `John Elsley` had dark magenta-colored flowers. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium `Dilys`. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Nanoose Bay, British Columbia, Canada, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Dilys` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new Geranium were larger than plants of `Dilys`. 2. Plants of the new Geranium had larger flowers than plants of `Dilys`. 3. Plants of the new Geranium and `Dilys` differed in flower color as plants of `Dilys` had red purple-colored flowers."  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights 33003 granted 18/6/2012.
'Bob's Blunder' Accepted name Crûg Farm Plants, 2002 A plant given to Crûg by Bob Brown (Cotswold Garden Plants) in mistake for G. 'Rosie Crûg'.  It is described as having "...a low habit, with a basal rosette of light brown rounded and lightly lobed leaves. It has pale pink, upwardly facing veiny flowers, born on progressively elongating flowering stems throughout the summer months".
'Bodenfalle' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2006 A plant obtained by Robin Moss from Geert Lambrecht.  Described as being a medium sized plant with white flowers and blush pink veins. 
'Bokrastar' Accepted name x oxonianum CPVO, 2012 Application for CPVO rights withdrawn during application in 2014.
'Boterdael's Purple' Accepted name G. psilostemon G. endressii "The Plantsman", vol.5(3), p.171, 2006 This hybrid has small flowers and an unusually small central eye.  It is not widely cultivated.
'Braeside' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Working name prior to publication of cultivar name.  See G. 'Hexham Pink'.
'Breckland Brownie' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2000/2001 Described as having "..leaves very heavily blotched and suffused dark pourplish brown, often more brown than green, like a US chocolate cake or a small invisible person often found shooing demented pheasants in front of your car.  Flowers are violet with white edges to the petals. 30cms".
'Breckland Fever' Accepted name G. x monacense Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2002/3 A plant distinguished by its long flowering period, from April to July and its "..deliriously feverish rosy mauve flowers.  Its also extremely spotty. 75cms tall".
'Breckland Sunset' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 1997/8 Described as having flowers "strongly veined deep carmine-pink flowers the colour of the sky towards Thetford in a haze of combine dust"!  
'Bregover Pearl' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Raised by Bregover Plants, Cornwall, early '90's and now widely marketed.  Mid-sized plant with broadly lobed, small, mid-green  leaves with faint inter-nodal blotches and lustrous, very pale pink flowers.
'Bremdra' CPVO Accepted name G. psilostemon G. procurrens CPVO, 2012 CPVO grant 25544 made 15/8/2009 to Alan Bremner.  Described as having "Very large intense magenta flowers up to 5cms in diameter.  A large plant which can grow up through shrubs".  See also G. DRAGON HEART
'Bremdream' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. traversii G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 Application to CPVO made 15/2/2012 and rights granted 15/10/2013 under title 35667. Granted USPP 24624 on 8th July, 2014. Described as "A sprawling plant, with largish white/blush flowers with eyelash veins to 50% of petal length". See also G. DREAMLAND
'Bremerry' CPVO Synonym G. x antipodeum G. x oxonianum USPP, 2007 A plant awarded CPVO grant of rights 22921 on 15th August 2008 under this name, but previously awarded US Plant Patent 18263 in 2007 under the name 'Orkney Cherry', giving that name priority. See G. 'Orkney Cherry'
'Bremigo' CPVO Synonym G. ibericum subsp. jubatum G. libani CPVO, 2004 A plant raised by Alan Bremner as part of his breeding programme.  Plant given CPVO grant 17320 under this name on 15th June, 2006.   US Plant Patent 16305 granted under the name G. 'Sabani Blue' on 7th March, 2006.  Thus the  cultivar name is 'Bremigo' as that name has priority.  USPP application says its best comparator is G. x magnificum from which it can be distinguished by "its early flowering, its upward facing flowers, its tolerance of full sun and its tight mounding foliage.  Its petal colour is RHS Violet N88B, but paler with veins nearest purple N79B."  See also G. 'Sabani Blue'.
'Brempat'  Accepted name G. endressii G. psilostemon GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by Alan Bremner and named after Mrs Patricia Doughty. Plant breeders rights applied for in Holland by Alan Bremner in 2002 but application denied.  See also G. PATRICIA.  RHS Wisley AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Mound-forming to spreading perennial to 65 x 130cm in trial. Basal leaf blades to ca.160 x 170mm borne on long petioles to c 48cm, with short, white adpressed hairs becoming sparse and curly on the undersides, yellow-green (146A) becoming red-flecked, aging to brown, divided into 5 or 7 to about four fifths; divisions not overlapping, lobed to between one third and one half, the lobes further lobed, these rather narrowly triangular, acute, irregularly toothed. Stem leaves in pairs, 3-5 times divided into regular, narrowly triangular, sharppointed lobes and persistent, triangular, long-pointed stipules, 8   2mm. Stems green with an even covering of long to medium gland-tipped hairs. Inflorescence borne around periphery of foliage. Flowers in pairs, pedicels tacky to touch. Sepals elliptic-oblong, covered in glandtipped hairs, mucro to 4mm. Flowers large to 50mm across, reddish-purple (74A) veined reddish-purple (redder than 79A) these uniting at centre to give a shiny dark centre to flower; petals obovate to broad obovate."
'Bressingham' Rejected name G. psilostemon Part of name missing.  See G. 'Bressingham Flair'.
'Bressingham Delight' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Bressingham has the " 's" missing.  See G. 'Bressingham's Delight'.
'Bressingham Flair' Accepted name G. psilostemon Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1969 Raised by Alan Bloom in the mid 1960's.  Similar to the species, but flowers a paler pink.
'Bressingham Pink' Accepted name G. dalmaticum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1958 Originally raised at Blooms Nursery, it still circulates in Europe, but not in the UK.  Described as 'a little deeper than the type'. 
'Bressingham Pink' Rejected name G. psilostemon Incorrect name, see G. 'Bressingham Flair'.
'Bressingham's Delight' USPP Accepted name G. x oxonianum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1995 This cultivar was a chance seedling found by Adrian Bloom in Bloom's of Bressingham's Dutch subsidiary.   US Plant Patent 10474 issued 30th June, 1998.  This describes it as having "..dark pink flowers with prominent veins" with a "bushy clump habit which produces profuse and continuous flowering".  It states that "In comparison to 'Wargrave Pink', perhpas the closest cultivar for comparison purposes, 'Bressingham's Delight' is generally similar in habit and flower colour.  However, it has more vigorous growth while maintaining a low flowering height, is a more profuse bloomer and has a longer flowering period".
'Bridal Bouquet' Accepted name G. dalmaticum Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 A plant raised by Slack Top Alpine Nursery, Hebden Bridge, Yorkshire.  Described as being "A compact plant, with shiny green leaves and white and pink flowers.  5 x 24".
'Bright Eyes' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum The Garden, UK, 2003 Described as having "..soft, dark green leaves and masses of tiny pale-eyed violet flowers from late spring onwaards.".  Plant shown at the RHS London Flower Show by Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants of Hampshire in April 2003.
'Bright Stranger' Rejected name This is a working name whilst the new cultivar G. 'Trevor's Welcome' was under development. 
'Brookside' Accepted name G. pratense G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple' Axletree Nursery, UK, 1989 Found in experimental beds at Cambridge BG, late 1970's.  Entered by Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM.
'Brown Sugar' Undetermined name G. phaeum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Raised by Robin Moss, but no description available. Name based on the Rolling Stones song.
'Buckland Beauty'  Accepted name Unknown Wildside Plants, 2005 Described by nursery as "Our cross with a compact habit, purple-red foliage and producing soft, cerise-pink flowers all summer long." Information from National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss.
'Buckland Bronze' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Porter's Pass' x G. traversii var. elegans) Garden House Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by Keith Wiley, The Garden House Nursery, Buckland Monachorum, Devon.  Described as having rounded soft purple leaves with a grey sheen.  Flowers all summer on long trailing stems.  Flowers 15-20mm across, opening pink fading to pale pink.
'Bulgaria' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1992 A wild form collected in Bulgaria and released by Blooms.
'Bullfinch' Accepted name Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Seedling selections from Terry Hatch, New Zealand, of plants grown by Mrs Esme Finch of Wellington, NZ.  Low mounding plant with quarter size blood/mud coloured leaves with prominent veins.  Flowers white/pale pink.  8" x 12"
'Buttercup' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 1997 White fringed leaves marked chocolate.  Masses of narrow-petalled starry flowers in light pink.  A compact grower.
'Buxton's Blue' Rejected name G. wallichianum various Synonym of G.  'Buxton's Variety'
'Buxton's Blue Select' Rejected name G. wallichianum de Hessenhof, Holland, 1993 In breach of Article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code if published after 1/1/96:  'Select'.  Now renamed G. 'Blue Sunrise'.
'Buxton's Pink' Accepted name G. wallichianum Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2000 A seedling raised by Thompson & Morgan, nurerymen, with pink rather than the horticulturally normal blue flowers.
'Buxton's Variety' Accepted name G. wallichianum AT Johnson, 'A Garden in Wales', 1937 Raised by Mr E. C. Buxton, Betws-y-Coed, Wales, ca 1920.  Originally published by A T Johnson in "A garden in Wales", 1937, as 'E. C. Buxton's Var.'.  At the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials Stage 3 2004-6 it was recommended that its AGM should be considered for being rescinded at the next Trial scheduled for 2012.
'Caerulea Plena' Rejected name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. pratense 'Plenum Caeruleum'.
'Caeruleum' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Clifton, 1979 Originally published as G. sylvaticum var. caeruleum by Ingwersen, 1946.  Collected in the Rest-and-be-Thankful Pass, Scotland, by Walter Ingwersen.  
'Caeruleum Plenum' Rejected name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See of G. pratense 'Plenum Caeruleum'
'Cakor' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1990 Misspelt: See 'Czakor'.  
'Calligrapher' Accepted name G. phaeum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Of garden origin, raised by John Sirkett, Mallorn Gardens, Cornwall.  Bluish-purple flowers, with a paler centre, and deeper violet veins across the central part.  Tips of petals pointed.
'Cally Pearl' Accepted name G. erianthum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant brought back from Japan by Michael Wickenden of Cally Gardens Nursery, Scotland.  Described by Robin Moss as having "Wonderful pearlescent white flowers, with thin purple veins to two-thirds of the petal length.  18" tall".
'Cally Seedling' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Cally Gardens, UK, 1997/8 In breach of article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code: The use of the word 'Seedling'.  A chance seedling arising at Cally Gardens Nursery.  No replacement name assigned.
'Calm Sea' Accepted name G. erianthum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Raised from seed from the botanic gardens of the Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok and  illustrating the form of G. erianthum growing in eastern Asia.  Very pale blue flowers with feathery, darker veining.
'Cam Beauty' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A chance seedling that arose in the garden of Mrs Angie Aston in Dursley, Gloucestershire.  Described as being "similar to G. x oxonianum 'Thurstonianum' but having young foliage that is very golden and slightly downy.  The flower colour is nearly the same as G. psilostemon but has pronounced dark veining from the petal base to the edges. The flower form has broader, flatter petals than 'Thurstonianum' but the sepals are still visible between them.   Dimensions after three years were 60cms x 80cms (HxW).' 
'Cambridge' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Axletree Nursery, UK, 1989 The first cultivar of this hybrid originating in cultivation.  Raised by Dr Helen Kiefer, Cambridge BG, 1974.  Dull, reddish-purple flowers.  The most vigorous cultivar of this hybrid.
'Camce' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Plant material was obtained from UK National Collection under a misspelt name.  See G. 'Cham Ce'.
'Candy Pink' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 A long blooming selection with mid lilac pink flowers.  18 x 20 "
'Canon Miles' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Plant raised by John Anton Smith, Prestbury. A small form of G. sanguineum with mid-pink flowers and a darker rim.
'Carlesii' Rejected name G. tuberosum Cally Gardens, UK, 1996/7 Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  No replacement name assigned.
'Carmina' Rejected name G. x cantabrigiense Misspelt: See G. 'Karmina'. 
'Carmine' Undetermined name G. sanguineum A name referred to in a posting to the Perrenials List on e-mail as a plant in circulation in the USA.  Published description not found.
'Carnival' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name. See G. 'Catforth Carnival'.
'Carol' USPP, CAN, CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum group   "New & Unusual Plants", v4:1, 1998 Bred by Carl & Janette Lowe of Border Alpines, and named after a friend of Janette.  Described as having large red-pink flowers with red veins and a dark eye. US Plant Patent PP14124 issued 2/9/2003:  applications says that "Foliage RHS 137A/138B. Upper surface of petals 74B/78A, veins 79A."  UK PBR grant 6735 made 6/3/1998, but withdrawn September 2002.  Canadian PBR grant made 3/3/2006, number 2398.   CPVO grant 2774 made on 4/5/1998, but withdrawn 2003.   
'Carrie's White' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 From the garden of David Whitworth and given to Robin Moss.  Described as being "A very low-growing form of G. pratense, no higher than 40cms, with pure white flowers and distinctive dark blue stamen."
'Casterino' Undetermined name Name found, but no publication details.   
'Castle Drogo' Accepted name G.  endressii Catforth Gardens, UK, 1998 Plant found at Lutyen's Castle Drogo in Devon.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Mound-forming becoming spreading perennial to 40 x 120cm in trial. Basal leaf blades to c65   70mm on petioles to 200mm, with an even covering of white, rather bristly, eglandular hairs mostly confined to the veins on the underside, mid green (137A), pentagonal in outline, divided to about three quarters into 5 or 7; divisions overlapping, widest about the middle, shallowly lobed; lobes obscure with a cut margin, sharp-pointed. Stem leaves in pairs, 5 times divided with jagged lobes becoming smaller and simpler towards the apex. Stems green, evenly covered with patent, medium and short hairs, the latter gland-tipped. Inflorescence borne around the periphery of the foliage and separated by a length of bare stem. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, 7 x 3mm, mucro c1mm, hairs confined mostly to the veins. Flowers to 25mm across, peachy purple (52C/D) with fine, slightly darker veins, older flowers becoming bleached between the veins to pale pink (75C); petals obovate to obcordate, c16 x 10mm, overlapping, distinctly notched.
'Catforth Cadense' Rejected name G. pratense "Plant Finder", 1997 Misspelt:  See G.  'Catforth Cadenza'. 
'Catforth Cadenza' Accepted name G. pratense Catforth Gardens, UK, 1996 The cultivar has variegated gold-green foliage, with very pale lilac-blue flowers.
'Catforth Carnival' Accepted name G. sanguineum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1996 Seedling found by Judith Bradshaw at Catforth Gardens, with large silky flowers coloured lavender pink.  22cms tall.
'Catforth Sam' Accepted name G. asphodeloides Catforth Gardens, UK, 1999 Seedling found by Judith Bradshaw in the Catforth Gardens and named after one of her grandsons.  Pale purplish-pink flowers with petals that are veined more darkly.
'Catherine Deneuve' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. psilostemon see notes USPP, 2013 From the French growers Thierry and Sandrine Delabroye. USPP 23370 granted 29/1/2013.  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights grant 35822 made 15/10/2013.  Described as having "..finely cut magenta flowers atop vigorous green foliage on a robust, quick-growing plant.  Height to 50 cms".  The USPP licence has a full description of the cultivar and says that it is a hybrid of G. psilostemon and G. procurrens.  However, the breeder says that he now believes that the second parent is G. x oxonianum 'Thurstonianum'.  The comparison made by the USPP Examiner would be incorrect if that is true.
'Cedric Morris' Accepted name G. sanguineum Bath & Jones, 1994 Collected by Sir Cedric Morris from the Gower Coast, Wales.  A very large form of the species.
'Celtic White' Accepted name G. robertianum Clifton, 1979 This cultivar was originally named by  Peter Yeo, who noted that Bowles (1914) had tried to trace its source was always led to Sir Charles Isham, but could not find where he got it.  White flowers.
'Chadwell's Pink' Accepted name G. wallichianum Margery Fish Nursery, UK, 1992? Plant in East Lambrook Manor garden, from seed collected by Chadwell in Nepal.  Described as ".similar in form to the type, with mid-pink flowers with darker pink veining and a white "eye", petals just touching."  G. 'Pink Buxton' may be a synonym.
'Cham Ce' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2006 A seedling that appeared at the Hans Simon nursery in 1989 and named by one of the gardeners, Pia Rudolf, after a Balkan dance.  Described by Andrew Norton, sometime UK National Collection Holder, as being "..similar to the type, except for increased vigour, and with very bright, almost fluorescent, pink flowers."   Due to a misunderstanding between suppliers, this entry was originally made under the name G. 'Camce', which is invalid.
'Chantilly' Accepted name G. gracile G. renardii Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by A. Bremner and originally marketed by Axletree Nursery.  Upright in stature as with G. gracile and with similarly shaped foliage, which is wrinkled as in G. renardii.  Flowers as G. gracile, but larger and pale reddish-purple.
'Chapel End Pink' Accepted name G. x riversleaianum Journal RHS, 1967, p92 Raised by Jan Stephens 1967. 
'Chapel End Red' Accepted name G. x riversleaianum Journal RHS, 1967, p92 Raised by Jan Stephens 1967. 
'Charles Perrin' Rejected name G. phaeum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Mrs Charles Perrin'.
'Chatto's Form' Rejected name G. maculatum In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'. See G. 'Beth Chatto'.
'Cheryl's Shadow' USPP Accepted name G. x antipodeum? USPP, 2004 A chance seedling arising at the nursery of David Fross in California. US Plant Patent 14,701 granted 13/4/2004.  USPP application says that closest comparator is 'Pink Spice' but that it has "smaller leaves, dark purple foliage, open rosette branching, small pale pink flowers and a low spreading habit."
'China Blue' Accepted name G. pratense unknown Alaskan species Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1994 Raised by Michael Pitkin at Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia from seed collected at Crow Creek, Alaska.
'Chipchase Castle' Accepted name G. 'Brookside' seedling HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 A chance seedling found in a gravel path at Chipchase Casetle by Robin Moss and introduced  by Chipchase Nursery.    Described as being "..a slightly lower growing form of G. 'Brookside', with flowers of a lighter, smoky powder blue colour".
'Chippy' Accepted name G. robustum G. pulchrum HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2003 A seedling that arose in the garden of Jean Gomershall, Llwyn Nursery, Harlech, North Wales. Described as having ".. flowers identical to G. robustum and the leaves having the same form, but twice the size and softly silver.  It made a mound 60cms by 60 cms by the end of the summer."    
'Chocolate Biscuit' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as "A normal G. phaeum, but with large chocolate-brown flowers."
'Chocolate Candy' UK PBR Accepted name G. 'Stanhoe' Jansen Vaste Planten, Netherlands, 1994 Raised by Coen Jansen, Dalfsen, Netherlands in 1992, from a cluster of seedlings found in his garden around a plant of G. 'Stanhoe'.  Cultivar said to have ".. chocolate coloured leaves, 25 cms tall".  UK PBR grant number 6932 made 1/4/1999  - see Defra Gazette 5/2002.
'Chocolate Chip' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Plant selected by Robin Parer at the Geraniaceae Nursery, California, in 1995.  Dark flowers near to the colour of plain chocolate.
'Chocolate Pot' Undetermined name In 1999 Plant Finder, offered by Hillside Gardens, Bristol.  They bought it from a sales table at Kingston Maurward College. Published description not found.
'Chocolate Strawberry' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "..very blotched foliage with strawberry pink flowers."
'Chris' Accepted name G. wallichianum Rosies Garden Plants, UK, 2003 A plant purchased by Jacky A'Violet of Rosies' Garden Plants from the now defunct Washfield Nursery and said to be from Edinburgh RBG (who disclaim it).  Said to have "Purple flowers with darker veins.  Soft dark green leaves.  Height 30 cms, flowering July to September.  Excellent Autumn leaf colour". .
'Chris Canning' Rejected name G. himalayense x G. pratense Misspelt:  See G. 'Criss Canning'
'Christine Pitkin' Undetermined name Raised by Michael Pitkin, Arcadia, Sydney, Australia and marketed by Viburnum Gardens Nursery.  Published description not found.
'Christine's Smile' Accepted name G. maculatum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A seedling founr in the garden of Mrs Susan Clarke, in Nantwich Cheshire, growing amongst plants of G. 'Beth Chatto'. Said to have "Pale, lavendar-blue flowers, with over-lapping petals, with larger leaves than other cultivars, which are shiny green in colour. A strong grower, but rather slower to multiply than cultivars such as 'Beth Chatto' and 'Espresso'. Named for a family relation who always smiles.
'Cielito Lindo' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniaceae Nursery, USA,  1997 A form selected by Robin Parer at the Geraniaceae Nursery, California.  Cultivar has very large flowers with red veining.
'Clairet' Undetermined name G. phaeum A plant obtained by Dutch collector: Dr Geert Lambrecht pers comm.  Published desciption not found.
'Claret' USPP Accepted name E. chamaedryoides G. cinereum  USPP, 2012 A hybrid of Erodium and Geranium.  See Erodium list.  A most unlikely cross in the view of the Registrar.
'Claridge Druce' Accepted name G. x oxonianum RHS Journal, 89 (1964), p 209 Found by Dr Druce, at Oxford Botanic Gardens in 1900.
'Claudine Dupont' Accepted name G. x monacense Y. Gosse de Gorre, France, 1996? Selected by Mme. Claudine Dupont, a French introduction by Y. Gosse de Gorre in 1996.  .  Winner of a Silver Medal at the Fete de Plantes Vivaces de Saint-Jean Beauregard, under a jury presided over by Peter Yeo.  It has reflexed dusky-pink flowers with a greyish-blue ring that changes to gray at the basse of the petals.  Foliage is blotched with brown.
'Clos de Coudray' Accepted name G. nodosum Larch Cottage Plants, 2009 Described as having "Purple flowers with a white edge, flowering May to September.  Glossy maple-shaped leaves. 25 x 35 cms (h x w)".  Named after the famous woodland garden in Normandy, France.
'Cloud Nine' Accepted name G. pratense     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A plant from Helen Warrington of Ty Cwm Nursery in Wales. Described as being "a beautiful pale blue-lilac double form of the species, with very large flowers, growing in pairs, and growing to 120cms tall. It flowers prolifically in June-July". In the opinion of Robin Moss, an expert in cultivated Geraniums, "the best double G. pretense he has ever seen".
'Cluden Ruby' Accepted name G. pratense Charter House Nursery, UK, 1992 Collected by Cluden Water, Dumfries, by John Ross of Charterhouse Nursery in 1990. 
'Cluden Sapphire' Accepted name G. pratense Charter House Nursery, UK, 1992 Collected by Cluden Water, Dumfries, by John Ross of Charterhouse Nursery in 1990.   It has brilliant dark-blue flowers.
'Coccineum' Rejected name G. sanguineum Clifton, 1979 Latin form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code.  No replacement name assigned.
'Coeruleum' Rejected name G. pratense Misspelt:  See G. pratense 'Caeruleum'
'Coffee 'n Cream' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum subsp. novaezealandiae Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Collected by Graham Hutchins at Tennyson, NZ.  Light brown, milky coffee coloured leaves, pink flowers.  5 x 12"
'Coffee Time' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G. x oxonianum 'Lace Time'? Croftway Nursery, UK, 1998 Neat mounds of coffee brownish leaves with slightly trailing stems of pinkish white flowers of good size.  Flowers from May to October.  8 inches tall
'Color Carousel' Accepted name Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant originated by Dutch nurseryman Marcus van Noort.  Said to have "..pale pink flowers, with darker zones, petals which are separated.  Height 35 cms, spread 40 cms.  Flowering from June to September in full sun".
'Compactum' Undetermined name G. sanguineum An old cultivar that has certainly been in circulation for 30 years and probably more.  Hans Kramer, the Dutch nurseryman says that he obtained his first plants from Jacob Eschmann, Switzerland, at least 30 years ago and, incidentally, claims that it is the shortest G. sanguineum he has ever grown.  Whilst, Index Hortensis (1986) claimed it as a nomen dubium this may not be the case, the problem being to prove it one way or the other.  It would not be valid ifthe  original publication was after 1958.  
'Confetti' Accepted name G. yoshinoi Terra Nova Nurseries, USA, 2003 Described as "..this new introduction has a unique variegated leaf.    Confetti like splashes cover the foliage, brightest in spring on new foliage.  Flowers are pink, small and bloom over a long period.  Nice low spreading habit."  There is some speculation that this is the same plant as G. 'Jester's Jacket', in which case this is probably a synonym.
'Connie Hansen' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Plant raised by Connie Hansen, Lincoln City, Oregon and introduced by The Geraniaceae Nursery, California.  Highly distinctive.  Large, light pink flowers with a pale centre.  15 x 24"
'Connie's Var' Rejected name G. sanguineum Working name prior to cultivar name being given.  See G. 'Connie Hansen'.
'Conny Broe' Accepted name G. phaeum Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 This plant was brought to Birgitte Husted Bendtsen open garden by two friends and she passed it to Coen Jansen, the Dutch nurseryman.  It is described as having "..foliage that soon after emerging changes from green to green, netted with yellow.  This reticulation disappears in late summer when the leaves return to plain green.  It has bordeaux (claret) red flowers".
'Coombeland White' Rejected name G. lambertii x G. traversii Misspelt: See G. 'Coombland White'
'Coombland Form' Rejected name G. dalmaticum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1993 In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Coombland White' Accepted name G. lambertii G. traversii GGN, 41, 1991 Raised by the late Rosemary Lee of Coombland Nursery.  Said to be "..like a G. lambertii 'Swansdown, but with upward facing flowers, white stained red at the centre'.
'Coquet Island' Accepted name G. himalayense G. wallichianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant bred by  Cyril Foster and named after the River Coquet which flows through his home town in Northumberland.  Described as having "Small round purple-blue flowers, with red veins.  12x15 ins".  See also G. COQUETTE ISLAND
'Coquetdale Lilac' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant submitted to the RHS Stage 3 Trials by Robin Moss.  Described as having "Large, rounded, lilac flowers, with light veining.  2ft 6ins tall".
COQUETTE ISLAND Marketing designation Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006  A marketing designation employed in the United States for the cultivar G. 'Coquet Island'.
'Corinne Tremaine' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Said to be a variegated form of G. x oxonianum 'Thurstonianum'.  Published description not found.
'Cornelia Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in the garden of Frans van Dongen, at Zevenbergschen Hoek in the Netherlands, and named after his wife.  Described as having "rather large pink-red flowers  and striking leaves with sharply drawn brown-black dots.  Height to 40 cms. Flowering June to August.  Easily propagated by division."
'Cornish Candy' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Spring 2006 A seedling that arose in the garden of a friend of Sheila Chandler, the proprietor of The Old Withy Garden Nursery in England and submitted to the RHS Geranium Trials in 2004. It was named after the County where it arose, with Candy referring to the candy pink coloured flowers. It is described as “A double with some similarity to G. 'Gernic' = G. SUMMER SKIES, but more compact in form. The flowers are quite small and double, with a button middle like G. pretense ‘Plenum Violaceum’, pale pink in colour.  Flowers appear at midsummer, in small clusters.  The foliage is similar to other G. pratense and are quite finely cut." The name was previously mentioned in "The Plantsman", vol. 4 part 3 p174 2005 without description. 
'Coronet' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1996 Raised by the late Barbara Keuning, Holland and marketed by Axletree Nursery.  It has bright reddish-pink flowers.
'Cosmic' Accepted name G. sanguineum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1998 New introduction in 1998 from Rainforest Gardens, British Columbia, Canada.
'Coton Goliath' Accepted name G. psilostemon   Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2004/5 Originated with Betty Ellis at Coton, near Cambridge. Described as "..perhaps the largest geranium !  The counterpart to 'Little David', an exceptionally large form to 2m or more"
'Crane's Bill' Rejected name G. ibericum In breach of article 17.13 of the Cultivated Code.  Use of a common name.  No replacement name assigned.
'Cream Chocolate' Accepted name x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss included in Hardy Geranium stage 2 trials at the RHS.  Robin describes it as "Eighteen inches high, with light green, heavily chocolate marked foliage.  Flowers white, slater blush, scarcely veined."
'Cricklewood' Accepted name G. sanguineum Cricklewood Nursery, USA, 1991 Raised and distributed by Dennis Thompson at the Cricklewood Nursery, Snohomish, Washington, USA.
'Crimson Beauty' Rejected name G. prichardii Invalid specific epithet, probably should be G. x riversleaianum.
'Criss Canning' Accepted name G. pratense G. himalayense Lambley Nurseries, Australia, 1997 Raised by David Glenn, at Lambley Nurseries, Victoria, Australia and named after his partner.  Described by Geraniaceae nursery as having "large, deep blue flowers.  12x24"".
'Croftlea' Undetermined name G. dalmaticum A plant raised by D. Hutton with initial marketing through Rumbling Bridge Nursery.  Plant included in RHS Hardy Geranium Trials.  Published description not found.
'Crg Dusk' Rejected name "Plant Finder", 1997 Misspelt: See  G. 'Dusky Crûg'. 
'Crg Pewter' Undetermined name Offered by Bridgemere Nurseries according to 1999 Plant Finder.  Published description not found.
'Crg Star' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 1999 Selected by Elworthy Cottage Plants from a range of seedlings found at Crg nursery.  Said to be "..similar overall to G. 'Thurstonianum', but with flowers that are a lighter pink and noticeably star shaped.  A vigorous cultivar".
'Crg Strain' Rejected name G. 'Nigricans'  x G. traversii var. elegans Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1993 In breach of article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of term 'Strain'. No replacement name assigned.
'Crg's Dark Delight' Accepted name Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 A seedling selected from Crg strain by Crg Farm Plants .
'Crg's  Darkest' Rejected name Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 In breach of Article 17.18:  Use of  'Darkest'. See G. 'Crg's Dark Delight'. 
'Crg's  Strain' Rejected name G. 'Nigricans'  x G. traversii var. elegans In breach of article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code: Use of term 'Strain'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Crystal Lake' USPP, CPVO  Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Silver Blue' RHS Enterprises brochure, 2007 A Hans Kramer plant.  US Plant Patent 18982 issued 24/6/2008, with comments "characterized by its upright and broadly outwardly spreading plant habit; freely basal branching growth habit; freely flowering habit; light violet blue-colored flowers with purple-colored venation;  differ primarily from ‘Silver Blue’ in flower color as plants of the cultivar ‘Silver Blue’ have blue-colored flowers;  compared to ‘ Jolly Bee’ it differed in flower color as ‘Jolly Bee’ had darker violet blue-colored flowers.”  CPVO rights granted in 15/8/2008 under licence number 22747.  Described as having "..large, silvery-blue, cup-shaped blooms, with dark purple veining appearing from early summer.  Height to 50cms." 
CRYSTAL ROSE  Marketing designation See G. 'ABPP' for cultivar name.
'Curly Girly' Accepted name Possibly G. suzukii     HGG newsletter, Autumn 2016 A seedling found by Robin Moss in his garden. Said to be "A low-growing plant with a mixture of small white and pink flowers over green foliage; a perfect companion to G. 'Rothbury Red' A gem of a plant."
'Cygnus' Accepted name G. robertianum Clifton, 1979 A name applied by Richard Clifton to plants with rather little brown pigment, to which the botanical name G. robertianum forma leucanthum Beckhaus has been applied, possibly improperly.
'Cynan Spider' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2004 A cultivar raised by nurseryman Jim Haunch.  Described as being "A medium-pink flower with undeveloped petals over 23 mm long and 2mm wide, giving the plant a spidery look.  Five outer and three inner petals."   Named after his home.
'Cyril's Blue' Accepted name G. clarkei/saxatile?? Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A plant from Cyril Foster being released by Robin Moss.  Described as being "Low-growing, with steely, ligh-blue, unveined flowers".
'Cyril's Fancy' Accepted name G. sylvaticum G. albiflorum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1997 A hybrid raised by Cyril Foster.  The plant produces many large, pale lilac flowers with separated petals, flowering from May to June.
'Cyril's Superb White' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2011 A seedling found by Cyril Foster, described as being "A white form of G. sylvticum, vigorous, 75-90cms tall, with very large white flowers with a faint pink tinge at the centre."
'Czakor' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Gärtnerei Simon, Germany,1975 Collected by Dr Simon in the Czakor Gorge, Montenegro.  Similar to G. 'Bevan's Variety', but with slightly more strongly coloured flowers.
'Danielle Muylle' Accepted name G. 'Martha' HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2005 A garden seedling found by Geert Lambrecht in his garden in Belgium, near to his hybrid G. 'Martha' and assumed to be a seedling of that plant.  He describes it as "A low-growing, big flowered  hybrid, with mauve flowers and purple veins".
'Danny Boy' Accepted name G. wlassovianum G. palustre? Geranium Register, Version 2 A plant raised by David Browne of Coombland Nursery, UK, and being introduced by David Howard of Howard Nursery, Norfolk.  It is named after the son of the raiser.  Described as "Light and airy, 50 x 160cm wide. Leaves Yellowish Mid Green 146A. Flower to 3.5cm, vivid Purple 78A, finely veined Red 60A. Flowering prolifically from 30.5.06 to 4.8.06, peaking from the end of June to the beginning of July."  Entered by Coombland Gardens into the RHS Wisley Geranium Stage 3 Trials 2004-6 where it was awarded an AGM.
'Dark Dream' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant found by Marie Addyman.  Described as being "Of the standard form, but with very black flowers, green stems and with unblotched leaves.  See also G. 'Lady in Mourning'.
'Dark Form' Rejected name G. nodosum In breach of article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of term 'Form'. No replacement name assigned.
'Dark Side of the Moon' Accepted name G. platypetalum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A seedling from Robin Moss.  Described as "Unlike G. 'Genyell'  and G. 'Turco' having no veins but dark blue flowers with intermixed haloes of purple.  Much darker than G. 'Georgia Blue'."
'Darkest Form' Rejected name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 In breach of article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of term 'Form'. Non replacement name assigned.
'Darkleaf' Undetermined name G. nodosum A plant circulates under this name, but no further details are known other than it has dark foliage and deep pink flowers.
'David Bromley' Accepted name G. phaeum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 2000 A seedling found by David Bromley and introduced through Monksilver nursery.  In the RHS Trials it was similar to G. 'Calligrapher', but slightly lower growing, had paler leaves and somewhat darker flowers.
'David Martin' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Release 2 A plant found at a car boot sale by Gary Bartlett of Sittingbourne in Kent.  He describes it as having "..a flower shape similar to 'Rose Madder', but which is dusky pink with a white eye.  The leaf has little brown blotching."  The plant is named after Mr Bartlett's late father-in-law.  Picture in HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012.
'David McClintock' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1993 Similar to G. 'Thurstonianum', but richer pink flowers with darker veins and curiously upright growth habit before flowering.
'David Rowlinson' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG newsletter, Spring 2004 A seedling found in the garden of Jane Robinson and thought to be a seedling of either G. 'Claridge Druce' or G. 'Lace Time'. According to the publication notes "It has pure clean bright green foliage without any blotching. The flowers are pure waxy white and seem never to show any tendency to fade to pink as the flowers go over. There is absolutely no visible veining. The flowering stems stand erect between 20 – 30 cm. The plant so far appears compact and is robust. It shows no tendency to set seed which means that propagation is by vegetative means only. "  The plant is named after the Husband of the finder.
'Dawn Time' Accepted name G. x oxonianum 'Walter's Gift' seedling Croftway Nursery, UK,1998 Extensive brown markings with very pale pink flowers over a long season.  24 inches tall.
'De Bilt' Accepted name G. pratense De Bloemenboeck, Holland, 1994 Raised by the Th. Ploeger Nursery from Holland and named after the town where it is located.
'De Bilt' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum In breach of article 17.1 of the Cultivated Code: duplicated cultivar name within a denomination class: See G. pratense 'De Bilt'
'Deep Purple' Accepted name HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 A seedling raised by Jos Vandeweijer, Belgium, from unknown parents, though possible deriving from G. 'Kashmir Purple'.  The plant has flowers of a very unusual intense purple.
'Delabroye' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A cultivar developed by Thierry Delabroye in France, which he described as being a better marked form of 'Walter's Gift'.  However, it is said that he soon stopped selling it as 'Katherine Adele' (which he also sold) was a far superior form.  No published description found.
'Delight' Undetermined name Said to have originated at Elworthy Cottage Gardens and retailed by Hillside Gardens.  Published description not found. 
'Derrick Cook' Accepted name G. himalayense Bath & Jones,  Issue 2, 2001 Collected by Derrick Cook near Narang, Nepal in 1984.  The flowers are similar in appearance to G. clarkei 'Kashmir White', but strikingly different in that the flowers are much larger, having fuller petals, almost overlapping, and forming a rounder flower.  The petals are also heavily veined.  The mature plant has very large leaves.  Introduced via the NCCPG National Collection holder Andrew Norton.
'Deux Fleurs' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. x oxonianum? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 Raised and named by Ivan Louette, Belgium, and given to Jan Spruyt, a Belgian nurseryman and described by him thus: "A vigorous growing Geranium to 5-6 metres square, by 30-35cms.  Leaves medium green turning orange-red in Autumn. Two flowers, rather than the normal G. sanguineum single flower, on most flower stems.  The large flowers are reddish-pink, from June to September.  The plant does not propagate from root-cuttings, but by division, and only produces the occasional seed."
'Devil's Blue' Accepted name G. himalayense Croftway Nursery, UK, 2000 Introduced by Croftway Nursery in 1999, a seedling of G.himalayense  'Baby Blue'.   Described by them as being similar to G. 'Baby Blue', but having "very large pale violet-blue flowers and being 30cms tall".
'Devon Honey' Accepted name G. pratense "The Plantsman", vol.4 (3), 2005 Mentioned in article in "The Plantsman" vol. 4 part 3 p175 2005.  A plant sent to the RHS by Dr Ieuan Evans of Alberta Canada and originally purchased from the defunct Honeywood Nursery which operated out of Saskatchewan.  Described as "A pretty plant with blooms like those of G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum' held gracefully on compact, much-branched stems". 
'Devon Pride' Accepted name G. x oxonianum? G. psilostemon? Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 The name is adopted to cover a plant circulating in nurseries in the south-west of England.  It is described as being "Similar to G. PATRICIA = 'Brempat', but with smaller flowers, but very floriferous and lower growing."
'Diana' Synonym G. macrorrhizum Collected by Dr Roger Bevan: See JRHS, XCV11, 1972.   This is a synonym of G. m. 'Bevan's Variety - see RHS "The Garden", August, 1993, pp 342.
'Diane's Treasure' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2002 A chance seedling raised in the garden of Diane Sutton of Southport and Registered by Annette Cutts.  Said to be "A mound forming G. x oxonianum type of plant growing to 60cms by 60 cms, with mid-green foliage.  Flowers are star-shaped, with un-notched petals that only just touch, up to 2.5cms in diameter.  Petal colour is between RHS red-purple group 68D and red group 54D".
'Dilys' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. procurrens Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by A. Bremner and named after Dilys Davies.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005. Described as "Sprawling perennial, to 55 x 150cm in trial. Basal leaf blades to c55 x 75mm borne on long petioles to 240mm with short, sparse, white hairs confined to the veins on the underside; rectangular in outline, divided into 7, divisions overlapping, lobed to about half way, lobes rounded with minute tip, teeth irregular. Stem leaves in pairs, pentagonal, jagged, divided into 5 or 7, lobed, lobes acute with occasional teeth. Stems semi-prostrate, vigorous, forming a central mound, green, flushed red (183B) on exposed side with moderate covering of long and short, occasionally glandtipped hairs. Flowers borne singly or in pairs towards the tips of the branches. Sepals ovate-oblong, 6 x 3mm, mucro to 1.5mm. Flowers to 30mm, strong reddish purple (78B), veined red (71A); petals broad obovate, 17 x 13mm, varyingly notched."
'Dirk Gunst' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A seedling found by M. Dirk Gunst, Belgium.  The plant has foliage blotched with brown markes, with mid-pink flowers.
'Distant Hills' Accepted name G. pratense G. collinum Charter House Nursery, UK,1994 Raised by Alan Bremner.  A sister seedling of G. 'Harmony'.  A loosely growing plant with large, pale purplish-blue flowers with darker veins.  Flowering over a long period.
'Diva' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. swatense Catforth Gardens, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner.  A strong growing hybrid which produces large clumps of golden leaves and purplish red flowers during the summer.
'Dominique Finet' Accepted name G. renardii G. platypetalum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 In the early 1990's, Ivan Louette, a Belgian, crossed these two species and made various selections, one being G. 'Philippe Vapelle'.  From  a second generation he made more selections, one being this plant, which varies by being more clump-forming than the original.  Articles by J. Boterdael in Geraniaceae Group news, Spring 1991 and Jame Armitage in "The Plantsman", vol. 4 part 3, p173 2005.
'Doppeldecker' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum A cultivar quite widely grown in Germany and further east.   It appears to be a fairly normal purplish form of the species, very much like other garden forms.  No description has been found that separates it from other cultivars.
'Double Diamond Star' Accepted name Hayloft Plants, 2012 A plant being advertised for sale by Hayloft Plants in 2012.  Photo shows a semi-double, white flowers with purple shading to centre.  
'Double Jewel' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, release 3 Raised by Jan Verschoor in Haarlem, NL.  Described as having "white, double-petalled flowers with lilac-purple centres.  10 inches tall".
'Dr Reimer' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Plant in Gärtnerei Simon catalogue, 1996/7.  Published description not found.
DRAGON HEART Marketing designation G. psilostemon G. procurrens Fairweather Nursery 2006. Marketing designation for G. 'Bremdra'.
'Drake 2' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name. See also G. sanguineum 'Shepherd's Warning'
'Drake Strain' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of Article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Strain'. See G. 'Jack Drake'.
'Drake's No 1' Rejected name G. sanguineum ssp striatum Working name prior to Cultivar name being allocated.  See G. 'Jubilee Pink'
'Drake's No 2' Rejected name G. sanguineum ssp striatum Working name prior to Cultivar name being allocated.  See G. 'Shepherd's Warning'
'Drake's Pink' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 Described as having "Light pink, unveined flowers with dark green leaves.  Compact plant. 12x15 ins".
'Drake's Strain' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of Article 17.16 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Strain'.  See G. 'Jack Drake'.
DREAMLAND Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Bremdream'
'Dresden Pink' Accepted name G. endressii   Terra Nova Nurseries, USA, 2003 A form of G. endressii with vivid pink flowers and glossy foliage found by Dan Heims of Terra Nova Nurseries in Dresden, Germany in 2003.
'Droplet' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geranium Register, 2004 A new name given by the Registrar to the plant known incorrectly as G. sanguineum 'Minutum'.
'Dusky Crg' Accepted name G. Crg strain (G. x antipodeum) G. x oxonianum Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 A chance seedling found in the nursery at Crg Farm Plants.  Described as "Large, roundish, greenish-brown leaves; lavender flowers fading pale to base with purple veins."
'Dusky Gem' Accepted name Usual & Unusual Plants, UK, 2004 Described as having "Eye-catching flowers of the same colour as G. 'Little Gem', from central radiating stems.  Spring leaves dusky brown, which becomes slightly more geen as the season progresses.  Long flowering from Spring to Autumn on a sunny well drained site." Plant Breeders Rights being applied for by Darwin Plants of Holland. 
'Dusky Hills' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Flowers lightish blue pink.  24 x 18"
'Dusky Rose' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' hybrid Thompson & Morgan seeds, UK, 1996 G. 'Nigricans' hybrid.  Picture suggests traversii/oxonianum cross
'E. C. Buxton's Variety' Rejected name G. wallichianum "A garden in Wales", A T Johnson, 1937 Used by Johnson in "A Garden in Wales", but overtaken by G. 'Buxton's Variety.
'Eben' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, version 3, 2008 A plant with the standard G. pratense form, with dark blue flowers with white veins.
'Edith May' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2007 A plant from Mrs Lorraine Dingwall or West Forres, Morayshire, introduced by Mrs Jean Purkiss of Cottage Garden plants, Whitehaven, Cumbria, England. Named after Mrs Dingwall's mother. Described as having "Mid-green leaves, deeply cut into five sharply toothed lobes, and softly hairy.  Each flower is 5 cms across, trumpet shaped, opening wide with separated petals, a feature which is more pronounced as the flowers age at which time the petals recurve slightly.  The centreas are creamy white.  Flowering time May - November.  2 feet (60cms) tall in dry soil, 3 feet (90cms) in moist soil.  It will scramble into a shrub". 
'Egbert' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant found by Karin Wouters in the garden of Egbert Konings and named for him.  Described as having "Flowers of a transparent beige/dirty pink colour, green leaves, to 40cms."
'Eleanor Fisher' Accepted name G. lambertii G. procurrens "The Hardy Plant", HPS Journal, Vol 24 No2 Autumn 2003 Raised by Robert G. Page of Rawdon, Leeds from seed from G. lambertii growing amongst G. procurrens, given to him by Ms Eleanor Fisher.  Leaves are palmate, lime/gold, edged with red, of 10cms in diameter. Flowers are mauve (RHS 76A), with radiating purple streaks (RHS 83B), which are visible on the reverse; 4cms diameter. Plant spreads up to 5m across, scrambling amongst shrubs.  Differs from G. 'Salome' in maintaining foliage cover throughout season and from G. 'Ann Folkard' in flower colour.
'Elegans' Rejected name G. traversii Clifton, 1979 Latin form created after 1959, in breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code. See G. traversii var. elegans
'Elizabeth Ann' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. maculatum USPP, 2002 Found in the garden of Carol (Kim) Tyssowski, Baltimore, 1994, named after her niece, and introduced by Leslie Grayson, Grayson gardens, Royersford, Penn.  US Plant Patent 11252 granted 29/02/2000.  CPVO PBR licence 20327granted 15/8/2007. Described as "Upright, 70 x 95cm wide, flowers in and above chocolate foliage. Leaves Dark Reddish Brown, a little redder than 200B, to 14 x 17.5cm wide. Flower to 3.5cm, pale pinkish Purple 81C/D. Flowering prolifically from start of May to early June, with a second flush from late June to mid July."  Entered by Cotswold Garden Flowers into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials Stage 3 2004-6 where it was awarded and AGM.
'Elizabeth Ross' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Nigricans' x G. traversii)  G. oxonianum Charter House Nursey, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner and named after the wife of John Ross, the proprietor of Charter House nursery who launched the cultivar.  Perhaps the geranium cultivar with the most red flowers.
'Elizabeth Seager' Accepted name Bernwode Plants, UK, 2001 Originated by Elizabeth Seager via Bernwode Plants, Ludgershall.  Described as having "shocking pink flowers with ablack eye, on robust 3ft plants".
'Elizabeth Wood' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs., and named after the Godmother of a customer.  Described as being "..similar to G. 'Orkney Pink' but with lighter pink flowers and bronzey-green foliage".
'Elizabeth Yeo' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum Axletree Nursey, UK, 1993 Collected by Dr S K Raina in Kashmir.  Selection made by Peter Yeo and named after his wife.
'Elke' Accepted name G. sanguineum HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2005 A garden seedling purchased from the nursery of Geert Vandervalle in Deinze, Belgium by Geert Lambrecht.  Named after the nurseryman's daughter.  The latter described the petals as having "..a special colour (combination) like red satin with a paler edge, similar to G. 'Whiteleaf'". 
'Ella' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Walled Garden Nursery, Wilts, 2014 Raised at the Walled Garden Nursery and said to be "chocolate-patterened leaves, with candy-pink flowers (netted & veined darker).  40 cms. Flowering May to September."
'Elliot Variety' Rejected name G. sanguineum Misspelt:  See G. 'Elliott's Variety'.
'Elliott's Variety' Rejected name G. sanguineum Ingwersen, 1994 In breach of article 17.15 of Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Variety'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Els' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling founr by Geert Lambrecht in Belgium and named after his mother.  Described as being "A rather low, compact plant, changeable in growth.  Flowers a good pink-red colour, that hand downwards. To 40 cms and flowering May-June. Does not like wet conditions, prefers sun or partial shade."
'Elsbeth' Accepted name G. sanguineum Gärtnerei Simon, Germany, 1982  Wild collection by Hans Simon from Wallis region, Switzerland. 
'Elsbeth's Blush' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Beeches Nursery, UK, 2003 Described as having ".. Palest blush-pink, almost white flowers, 30 cms tall.  Slow to multiply". 
'Else Lacey' Accepted name G. pratense "The Plantsman", Vol 4 part 3 p175 2005 Described as "..producing a profusion of open double or semi-double, very pale blue flowers, oftern with rather small pink-tinged inner petals and a green centre".  Named after the late plantswoman in whose garden it was found.  
'Elspeth' Rejected name G. sanguineum Incorrectly spelt cultivar name:  See G. 'Elsbeth'.
'Elworthy Blue Eyes' Accepted name G. wallichianum Elworthy Cottage Gardens, UK, 2003 A seedling found by Mrs Jenny Spiller at her Elworthy Cottage Gardens Nursery in Somerset.  Described as having "..Large blue flowers with darker veins and a white centre, flowering over a long season, from summer to autumn. Trailing habit.  More vigorous than (the similar) G. 'Buxton's Variety'".
'Elworthy Dusky' Accepted name G. 'Brookside' ? (G. pratense x G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple') Elworthy Cottage Gardens, UK, 1999 A seedling found by Mrs Jenny Spiller at her Elworthy Cottage Gardens Nursery in Somerset. Thought to be a seedling of G. 'Brookside' and described as having "..very pretty dusky pink flowers.  30cms tall."
'Elworthy Eyecatcher' Accepted name G. endressii? G. wallichianum Elworthy Cottage Gardens, UK, 2001 A seedling found by Mrs Jenny Spiller at her Elworthy Cottage Gardens Nursery in Somerseat.  Described as having "..many large, eye-catching, deep pink flowers over a long season (June - November).  18" tall."
'Elworthy Misty' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Elworthy Cottage Gardens, UK, 1999 A seedling found by Mrs Jenny Spiller at her Elworthy Cottage Gardens Nursery in Somerset.  A seedling from G. 'Walter's Gift', with the same blotched leaves but deep pink flowers. 30cms.
'Elworthy Tiger' Accepted name G. himalayense ?? Elworthy Cottage Gardens, UK, 2006 a chance seedling found at Elworthy Cottage Gardens nursery.  Described as having "Large blue flowers with darker veins. 6" tall. Summer flowering"
'Emily' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Rosies Garden Plants, UK, 2002 A chance seedling found by Jackie A'violet at her nusery in 1999.  Described as having "..softest pink flowers fading to white centres.  Crinkled chocolate brown, mound forming foliage.  Evergreen.  Ht. 30 cms.  Flowering Jun/September.  Hardy to -15ºC".  Named after the first child of her friends Andrew and Caroline Naish.
'Emma White' Accepted name G. x monacense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 Found by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland in the local garden belonging to Susie White.  Described as having "The reddest of flowers ever seen on this hybrid, with very reflexed petals.  Very blotched foliage.  2 feet tall."  Named after Susie White's daughter.
'Erect' Rejected name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Invalid under Article 21 G 1 as purely adjectival.  No replacement name assigned.
'Eric Clement' Accepted name G. x monacense nothovar. anglicum Clifton, 1979 A chance seedling found by Patrick Roper, Hurst Green, Sussex.  Named after person who described it in 'BSBI News'.
'Ernst Pagels' Accepted name G. x magnificum seedling HGG Newsletter, Spring 2005 A plant that arose at the nursery of Coen Jansen in the Netherlands and was entered into the 2003 trials at RHS Wisley.  Thought to be a seedling of G. x magnificum 'Peter Yeo'.  The distinguishing characteristics are that the plant has basal leaves that do not much overlap and an open sinus.  Also, the petals do not overlap as they do in G. ‘Peter Yeo’ and the filaments are white at the base, but completely red in G. ‘Peter Yeo’. Named after the well known German nurseryman who has been a mentor to Coen.
'Espresso' Accepted name G. maculatum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 Raised by Dale Hendricks of North Creek Nurseries, USA.  Said to have "…dark red-brown foliage and a compact habit, with foliage which last well through the summer.  Flowers are lilac-pink, rather large for a G. maculatum cv.  Needs sun to keep the foliage the right colour".
'Eureka Blue' USPP, CPVO Accepted name hybrid hybrid USPP, 2012 A plant raised by Brian Kabbes, Netherlands.  US Plant Patent no. 22270 issued 22/11/2011, with notes saying: "Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium `Johnson's Blue`, not patented. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Suameer, The Netherlands, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Johnson's Blue` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new Geranium were larger than plants of `Johnson's Blue`. 2. Plants of the new Geranium had larger leaves than plants of `Johnson's Blue`. 3. Plants of the new Geranium had larger flowers than plants of `Johnson's Blue`. Plants of the new Geranium can also be compared to plants of Geranium `Brookside`, not patented. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Suameer, The Netherlands, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Brookside` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new Geranium were larger than plants of `Brookside`. 2. Plants of the new Geranium had larger leaves than plants of `Brookside`. 3. Plants of the new Geranium had larger flowers than plants of `Brookside`." Application for CPVO withdrawn 15/12/2011.
'Eva' Accepted name G. pratense G. psilostemon Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 Raised by Alan Bremner. Flowers have a velvety texture and are soft purple magenta.
'Evensong' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 A selection by Karen Wouters of the Dutch Pelargonium & Geranium Group.  Described as having "Lilac-pink flowers with purple veins."
'Evert' Accepted name G. maculatum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Originating at and selected by the former nursery Ploeger de Bilt and named for an employee.  Described as having "Soft bluish-lilac flowers with a diameter of about 3.5 cms.  Height to 40 cms."
EXPRESSION Marketing designation A marketing designation used sometimes in Europe for G. 'Tanya Rendall'
'Expresso' Rejected name G. maculatum Cherry Tree Lodge, 2002 Incorrect form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Espresso'
'Extravaganza' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Tranquility Cottage Nursery, 2014 A plant raised by Orkney Perennials, described as having "Green foliage with yellow-bronze tints…with reddish-pink flowers, with darker veins (and netting) and a lighter centre.  20 x 60 cms".  
'Farncombe Cerise Star' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum G. psilostemon HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2004 A plant entered into the RHS Geranium Trial, 2004, by Mrs Grace Officer who runs a nursery at Farncombe in Surrey.  Described as having "Rounded, veined light green leaves.  Flowers approx 15mm diameter, small, pointed petals in the shape of a double, cerise pink star.  A few single stars appear on the same plant.  Height about 90cms."
'Farrer's Form' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of article 17.15 of Cultivated Code.  Use of the term 'Form'.  See G. 'Reginald Farrer'.
'Farrer's Pink' Accepted name G. farreri Clifton, 1979 Raised CT Musgrave in 1924 and given an Award of Merit by the RHS in 1924.
'Fay Anna' Accepted name G. shikokianum G. wlassovianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling selected by Karen Wouters in the Netherlands and named after her dog.  Described as having "Rather small leaves on long stems that weave through neighbouring plants and is about 20-30 cms tall.  Flowers are pinkwith a white centre and dark pink veins.  Prefers a sunny or semi-shaded border that is not too dry."
'Feeber's Double' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Spring 2006 A plant submitted to the hardy geranium trials at RHS Wisley in 2003.  Described by the Trials Botanist, James Armitage, as having "Leaves divided almost to the base into 9, green (RHSCC 137A-B) , paler on the lower surface, with sparse, white, adpressed haris becoming prominent at the margin;  divisions narrow, little overlapping, lobed to about one halr of their length; lobes narrow, acute, irregularly toothed; teeth narrow, jagged, somewhat falcate.  Stems glandular hairy.  flowers to 26mm diameter, double, lacking the neat arrangement of G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum' with c11-13 petals; petals irregularly-shaped, obovate to abcordate, purple (RHSCC90B to 93B); sepals ovate-lanceolate, frequently with translucent margins, mucro to 3mm."  
'Feu d'Automne' Accepted name G. sanguineum Plantbessin, France, 1995 Raised and introduced by Mme C. Saint-Beuve of Plantbessin, France.  Described as having "..flowers identical to the type, 3 cms in diameter, with very good Autumn colour and free flowering."
'Fiona' Undetermined name G. pratense A plant listed by Hillside Cottage Plants, Somerset, 2000.  Published description not found.
'Fiona's Form' Rejected name G. pratense In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Fireworks' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.  Probably the name of a Pelargonium cultivar.
'Flamingo' Accepted name S. sessiliflorum ?? The Plant Nursery, UK, 1998 A seedling found at the Nursery in Moulton, Northamptonshire.  In spring the foliage, which is bronze, has bright pink markings on the leaves.  Dainty and numerous small pink flowers from spring to autumn.
'Flore Pleno' Rejected name G. pratense "Plant Finder", 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum'
'Flore Pleno' Rejected name G. sanguineum Heronswood Nursery, USA, 1998 In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code: Latin form created after 1959. No replacement name assigned.
'Flower Carpet' Accepted name Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "A low-growing, rather compact plant with dark-green toothed leaves.  It has small magenta-pink flowers, from May until frosts.  Propagate by division.  Not clear as to whether it belongs to the Endressii or Sessiliflorum Group.  Synonym is G. 'Pink Carpet'."
'Flower Fairy Rose' Rejected name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.  However, this is the name of a well-known Pelargonium cultivar.
'Fluorescent' Rejected name G. psilostemon Geraniumboekje, 2012 In breach of article 21 G1 as it is purely adjectival.
'Foie Gras' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Nigricans' x G. traversii)  G. oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1998 Seedling raised by Robin Parer of The Geraniaceae Nursery, California.  Compact mounds of purplish-brown foliage, with pink flowers.
'For Ever Peace' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in his garden by Arno Heijkamp at Ravenswaaij, Netherlands.  Described as having "Soft pink flowers and leaves with clear brown spots.  Height 35 cms.  Flowering June- August."
'Ford' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A plant purchased by Cyril Foster from Ford Castle Nursery, Northumberland, and passed onto Dutch nurserymen under this name.  Described by Robin Moss as having "Flowers that are heavily net-veined of lilac-white, on a plant 2ft 6ins tall".
'Foxholes' Accepted name G. phaeum Cranesbill Nursery, UK, 1978 Garden origin, from a garden in Shropshire, where it grew by a foxhole.
'Frances Grate' Accepted name G. incanum G. robustum Rambling Robin Group Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1995 Found in the garden of Frances Grate, Pacific Grove, California in 1987.  Similar to 'Rambling Robin'. 
'Frances Perry' Rejected name G. pylzowianum A plant that was available from Coombland gardens in the late 1980's, but never published.  No replacement name assigned.
'Frances Perry' Rejected name G. himalayense A plant that was available from Coombland gardens around 1990, but never published.  No replacement name assigned.
'Francien Walraven Accepted name G. albanum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A variety with red-tinted stems fiven to Rein ten Klooster, its introducer, by Francien Walraven, for whom it is named.
'Frank Lawley' Accepted name G. x oxonianum (ex G. endressii) Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Collected by Robin Moss in the garden of  Frank Lawley, Herterton House, Cambo, Northumberland.  Pale to mid-pink flowers with separated petals.
'Fran's Star' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 1999 Raised by Crûg Farm Plants and named after the late wife of Brian Varley.  Plant has semi-double flowers with brown-blotched leaves.
'Fran's Star' Rejected name G. sanguineum In Plant Finder as G. sanguineum, when it is, in fact, a G. x oxonianum.
'Freundorf' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Internationale Stauden Union registration Collected by Mr Praskac in 1985 at Freundorf, Austria.
'Frilly Gilly' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2008. Found in Robin Moss's garden in Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "semi-double salmon pink flowers, with petals with very frilly edges. 40 cms tall".
'Galactic' Accepted name G. pratense Yeo, 1985 An old cultivar of uncertain origin.  Probably the same plant as mentioned in Ingwersen, 1946, as G. pratense var. album.
'Garavetye' Rejected name G. x himalayense Hillside Cottage Gardens, UK, 1997 Misspelt:  See G. 'Gravetye'
'Gay Hellyer' Accepted name G. pratense Croftway Nursey, UK, 1998 Named after the wife of Arthur Hellyer, by their daughter Penny.  Pink tinted buds open to warm white flowers in June and July.  30 inches tall. Believed original introduction may have been by Hellyer's Garden Plants, Crawley, W. Sussex.
'Geert Lambrecht' Accepted name G. 'Nimbus' Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found by Geert Lambrecht in Belgium.    Described as having "Blue flowers with pink veins and a white centre.  The green leaves are slightly marbled and deeply divided.  They start the season  having cream margins and tops."
'Gele Samobor' Rejected name G. phaeum Working name for an unamed seedling of G. 'Samobor'. See  G. 'Golden Samobor'. 
'Genyell' Accepted name G. platypetalum Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2002 A recently introduced cultivar described as having "deep blue flowers.  45 cms tall.  Flowering June/July".  This is possibly the same plant as G. 'Turco' - it certainly looks very similar and both were collected in Turkey.  If so, 'Turco' will be the valid cultivar name and this will be a synonym.
'George Stone'  Accepted name G. phaeum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2003/4 Described as being "..Attractive and distinctive with wine-red flowers.  The leaves are suffused with a deep wine-red colouring towards the centre.  70cms".
'Georgia Blue' Accepted name G. platypetalum "Géranium Vivaces", 1997 Collected by Roy Lancaster, Klukorsky Pass, Sochumi, Caucasus, 1979
'Gerfos' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum cross RHS Rock Garden Trial Report,  2003-6 A plant developed by Cyril Foster of Rothwell, Northumberland and introduced by Blooms of Bressingham.  Described as follows "Plant forms a low mound of mid-green foliage, a little bluer than 137B: height 10cm, spread 20cm. Flowering from mid-May to late August. Flowers are 3cm in diameter; pale purple 75B/C, veined dark purplish-red 71A; anthers are brownish-yellow."  Entered by Blooms of Bressingham into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trials, 2004-6, where it was awarded an AGM.  EU Plant Breeders Rights licence 15501 issued 23/05/2005.  See also G. ROTHBURY GEM.   
'Gernic' CPVO Accepted name G. pratense 'Spinners' G. pratenses 'Striatum' CPVO, 1998 Cultivar raised by Kevin Nicholson, Walpole Marsh, Wisbech.  EU plant breeders rights grant 2775 made on 4/5/1998.   US Plant Patent issued 17/11/1998 numbered PP10,695 under the name 'Summer Skies'.  Described in USPP grant as having "upper surface of leaves RHS 137A, lower 137B.  Flowers double mature petals 84C to 73D, with a hint of greenish white 157D."   See also G. SUMMER SKIES.
'Gerwat' CPVO,  Australia Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Buxton's Variety' G. himalayense 'Plenum' CPVO, 2000 Cultivar found by Donald and Rozanne Waterer at the bottom of their garden in Kilve, Somerset and named after Mrs Waterer.  Described as "Low, semi prostrate, 30 x 100cm wide. Foliage Dark Green 147A, lightly blotched Yellow Green 146B-C. Flower top 4cm, Violet 88B, grading to pale Pink 82D on basal half of petal. Lightly veined translucent red. Anthers dark purplish brown. Flowering prolifically for a prolonged period, from 8.6.06 to the first frosts."  Entered by Beeches Nursery and Bloom's of Bressingham into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 3 2004-6, where it was awarded an AGM. The judges noted "G. 'Jolly Bee' and G. ROZANNE 'Gerwat' have larger flowers and a longer flowering season, starting earlier, than ‘Buxton’s Variety’, which is similar in colour. Flowers sometimes tinged mauve-pink early in the season. Both are also more vigorous with a low spreading habit."   CPVO Plant Breeders Rights grant 5538 made 14/4/2000 under this denomination name.  US Plant patent 12175 issued 30/10/2001 under the denomination 'Rozanne', which is thus treated as a synonym.  Australian PBR grant 2332 made 25/9/2003 under 'Gerwat'.  See also G. ROZANNE and G. 'Jolly Bee' for recent events.
'Gesian' Accepted name G. himalayense Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in the garden of Gesien Lauxtermann at Ankeveen, Netherlands and named for him in 2011 by the Dutch Pelargonium & Geranium Group.  Described as having "Blue flowers with purple-red veins and a white centre, 3cms in diameter.  Foliage is green, with leaves being up to 6cms across.  Height to 40cms."
'Giant Form' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of article 17.15 of Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.
'Gillian Perrin' Accepted name G. cinereum group  hybrid Margery Fish Nursery, UK, 1995/6 Garden seedling from  Johnny Norton, Heritage Plants.
'Ginette' Accepted name G. maculatum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant from the former nursery Ploeger de Bilt in the Netherlands and named after the owner's daughter.  Described as having "pink flowers with a diameter of 3.7 cms and a height of about 40cms."
'Giuseppii' Accepted name G. cinereum group    Alpine Garden Society Journal, 1934 Collected 1929 in Korab Mountains, Albania, by Dr P. L. Giuseppi.  Entered by Coombland Gardens and Allan Robinson into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trials, 2004-6, where it was awarded an AGM.  Described as "Semi-evergreen plant forms a mound of mid-green 137B foliage with upright to decumbent inflorescences. Flowering from 20 April to 15 July and sporadically in August and September. Flowers are 3cm in diameter; vivid purple 74A, faintly veined dark purplish red 71A with veins uniting at the base of the petals to give a dark eye; anthers are black."
'Giuseppina' Accepted name G. cinereum group    Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 1999 Raised by Eugen Schleipfer, Augsburg, Germany.  Deep carmine flowers with a black eye.  
'Glebe Cottage' Undetermined name Name found in listing.  Published description not found.
'Glenluce' Accepted name G. sanguineum Sunningdale Nursery, UK, 1966? Collected by A T Johnson near Glenluce, Wigtownshire, Scotland and described in his book 'A Woodland Garden', 1937.
'Glhwein' Accepted name G. cinereum group    Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 1999 Raised by Eugen Schleipfer, Augsburg Germany.  Wine red, with black eye
'Godula' Rejected name G. sanguineum Plant in French collection:  Dr Evrard pers comm.  Incorrectly named.  See G. 'Gudula'.
'Gold Leaf' Accepted name G. psilostemon Cotswold Garden Plants, UK, 1992 Garden seedling from Monica Lynden-Bell, Rockbourne, Hants.
'Gold Leaf' Rejected name G. pheaum Name already used by a cv. of G. psilostemon.  No replacement name assigned.
'Goldbrook' Accepted name G. incanum   Heronswood Nursery, USA, 2003 Described as "Forming mounds of filigree foliage and, throughout the summer, dark reddish-purple flowers."
'Golden Samobor' Accepted name G. phaeum Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 A seedling found by Coen Jansen at his nursery and probably a hybrid between G p. 'Samobor' and G. p. 'Golden Spring'.  Said to have "..yellow foliage in early Spring and has heavy blotching in blackish-brown later in the year.  A collectors plant.".
'Golden Spring' Accepted name G. phaeum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1996 Collected by both Robin Moss and Judith Bradshaw, of Catforth Gardens, in Scottish gardens.  Previously sold as G. p. 'Aureum' an invalid name.
'Goldmund' Accepted name G. phaeum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 A cultivar from  Olaf Grabner, Locktow, Germany, being marketed by Christian Kress in Austria.  Described as having "..clear yellow leaves over a long period, with pale lilac flowers".
'Goliath' Rejected name G. psilostemon Incorrect form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Coton Goliath'
'Gorer' Rejected name G. asphodeloides Unpublished form of G. 'Gorer's Pink'
'Gorer's Pink' Accepted name G. asphodeloides Margery Fish Nursery, UK, 1995? The plant collected by Richard Gorer in Greece and mentioned in Yeo, 1985.
'Graham Thomas' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Clifton, 1979 Raised by Walter Ingwersen, Birch Farm and sold by them as an unnamed hybrid.  Subsequently named by Richard Clifton.
'Grandiflorum' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum "The Genus Geranium", Ingwersen, 1946 A seedling found by Water Ingwersen at his nursery in the 1940's near to the original plants of G. m 'Album' and G. m. 'Ingwersen's Variety'.  Described as having flowers fully an inch across with the blossoms the same colour.  However, it is not clear as to which of the two putative parents it matches in colour!  Originally published as var. grandiflorum by Ingwersen, 1946.
'Grasmere' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'Gravetye' Accepted name G. himalayense RHS Journal, 1977, Yeo. According to Ingwersen, 1946, the plant was originally collected from Turkestan. It was originally erroneously described as G. grandiflorum var. alpinum and later published as G. grandiflorum Gravetye var. by A T Johnson, 1937.  NB. In view of the confusion regarding which plant is the true plant, a Standard has been established at RHS Wisley as a basis of comparison.  AGM to be reconsidered at next trial in 2012 following RHS Stage 1 Trials, 2002-4. 
'Greek Fire'  Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2011 A new introduction from Robin Moss, from seed originally collected by the botanist Nick Turland in northern Greece.  Quite different to the normal run of G. sylvaticum plants, it has red flowers.
'Green Ghost' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 A joint introduction between Robin Moss and Beeches Nursery.  Described as being "..a white flowered form of G. phaeum, distinguished by having a mixture of yellow and green foliage, which makes a great foil for the flowers.  It appears to be a better "do'er" than G. phaeum 'Album'".
'Gudula' Accepted name G. sanguineum Garnerei Simon, Germany, 2012 A plant from Simon nurseries, Marktheidenfeld, Germany.  A pale pink form of G. sanguineum, with good veins, 20 x 20 cms, May to September flowering.
'Guernsey White' Accepted name G. maderense "The Garden", RHS, 2007  Raised by Ray Brown of Plant World seeds, a form of G. maderense with white flowers, with a pink centre.
'Guiseppii' Rejected name G. cinereum Hillside Cottage Gardens, UK, 1997 Misspelt:  See G. 'Giuseppii'.
'Gulmarg' Accepted name G. clarkei Purple-flowered Group New Plantsman, Vol 3:2, 2004 This name is applied to the purple flowered introduction made by Roy Lancaster of a plant he collected under the reference L158, to separate the cultivar from G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple'. The name refers to the location where the plant was found.  
'Gwen Thompson' Undetermined name An accepted name on the RHS horticultural database.  No published description found.
'Gypsy' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Plantsman Nursery, UK, 1975? Raised by Eric Smith of The Plantsman Nursery, Dorset, 1970's.  Said to be a cross between G. 'Lissadell' and G. subcaulescens 'Splendens'.  A photograph of Trevor Bath's plant is shown in "The Hardy Plant", Vol. 22 No. 3, pp45, Spring 2001. Described as "low-growing with largish, mid-green 138A leaves and semi-sprawling inflorescences: height 15cm, spread 20cm. Flowering from 10 May to 8 July with a second flush in August.
Flowers are 3cm in diameter; vivid purple 74A, veined dark purplish-red 71A and have a dark eye surrounded with white."  Entered by the Hon. Anne Baring into the RHS Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trial, 2004-6, where it was awarded an AGM. 
'Hadspen' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Plant in circulation in Northern England: Dr Robinson pers comm.  Possibly raised at Hadspen House.  No published description found.
'Hampshire Purple' Rejected name G. sanguineum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 One of four conflicting names.  See valid form G. 'New Hampshire Purple'.
'Hannah Perry' Accepted name G. phaeum Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 Raised by Wendy Perry of Bosvigo Plants, Truro, Cornwall and named for her daughter, the late Hannah Perry, who died in the Boxing Day Tsunami.  Described by them as "Unusual coloured Geranium with lilac-blue slightly flat flowers in early summer over bright green foliage."
'Hannay's Form' Rejected name G. robustum Hannay's of Bath, UK, 1994 In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'. See G. 'Spencer Hannay'. 
'Hanne' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 A continental European introduction in the 2009.  Described as varying from the normal form of this hybrid by having a lilac inner area to its flowers, surrounded by white.
'Harmina' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in 2003 by Lolke de Jong in his garden in Drachten, Netherlands, and named for his wife.  Described as having "Pink flowers with strong veining.  Height 40 cms. Flowering May - September."
'Harmony' Accepted name G. pratense G. collinum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner.  A vigorous 1 metre tall bushy plant with lilac flowers, freely produced from late May to September. Similar in appearance to G. 'Distant Hills'.
'Harz' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 Raised by Herr Fuss of Königslutter of Germany.  Described as having "..nearly white flowers and is free flowering."
HAVANA BLUES Marketing designation G. wallichianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A marketing designation for G. 'Noorthava'
'Hazel Gallagher' Accepted name G. maculatum Sunny Borders Nursery, USA, 1995? Given to Sunny Border's Nursery, Connecticut, by John Gallagher and was named after his wife.
'Heather' Accepted name G. cinereum group    "New & Unusual Plants", v4:1, 1998 Bred by Carl & Janette Lowe of Border Alpines and named after Janette's sister.  Described as having large soft pink-red flowers held upright.  UK PBR grant 6905 made on 19/1/1999  - see Defra Gazette 5/2002, but subsequently removed in 2003.
'Hector's Lavender' Undetermined name G. phaeum A plant circulating in Australia.  Published description not found.
'Heidi Morris' Accepted name G. renardii Croftway Nursey, UK, 2001 Selected by Croftway Nursery and introduced in 2001.  Described as "Neat mounds of grey green sage textured leaves.  Larg lilac blue flowers, boldly veined with violet in June/July. 30cms tall."
'Helen' Accepted name G. himalayense 'Gravetye' G. pratense Yeo, 2001 Hybridised by Dr Helen Kiefer at Cambridge BG in 1975.  Yeo says that "  shows a stronger palmate tendency in the leaf-divisions than 'Johnson's Blue'.  Its flowers are 4.5cms wide and its petals are of a deeper colour than those of 'Johnson's Blue', abruptly fading to white at the base.  Specimes held at CUBG herbarium 1975.0288".
'Helen Gallagher' Undetermined name G. maculatum var. albiflorum A white flowered form of G. maculatum raised in the United States and thought to be named after the well-known Broadway actress of that name.  Published description not found.
'Helen's Pink' Undetermined name Named by Jean Purkiss of Express Plants and named for a neighbour of hers who had recently died.  Published description not found. 
'Herb Robert' Rejected name G. robertianum Clifton, 1979 In breach of article 17.13 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of common name.  No replacement name assigned.
'Heron' Undetermined name G. sylvaticum Error for G. pratense 'Purple Heron'?  Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plant Finder, 2002.
'Heronswood Gold' Accepted name G. maculatum Hibberd, 2003 Introduced by Heronswood nursery, USA, and said to have "..yellowish leaves that hold their colour well through the season".
'Hexham Big Eye' Accepted name G. nodosum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A selection of G. nodosum from the garden of Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "Flowers that are much larger than the type, lilac with eye-lash veins to two-thirds of the petal length."
'Hexham Big Eyes' Rejected name G. nodosum Geranium Register, 3, 2008 Erroneous spelling in original publication.  See: G. nodosum 'Hexham Big Eye'.
'Hexham Face Paint' Undetermined name nodosum A selection of G. nodosum from the garden of Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Mentioned on the RHS web site, but no published description found.
'Hexham Feathers' Accepted name G. nodosum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A selection of G. nodosum from the garden of Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "Very elongated, feathered, denticulated petals of lilac-purplish hue."
'Hexham Freckles' Undetermined name G. nodosum A selection of G. nodosum from the garden of Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Published description not found.  
'Hexham Grey' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A selection by Robin Moss of Hexham, described as having "Lovely rounded opaque grey/white flowers, to 70cms tall".
'Hexham Lace' Accepted name G. nodosum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 Found in the garden of Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "A typical G. nodosum, but with very denticulated lacey petals.  Pale white/lilac flowers."
'Hexham Pink' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1997? Raised by Robin Moss and named after his home town of Hexham.  A compact form, with overlapping, rounded petals of silvery pink.
'Hexham Spook' Accepted name G. pratense Unknown   HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 A G. pratense hybrid raised by Robin Moss. Said to be "60-75 cms in height, with beautiful icy pale blue flowers".
'Hexham White' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, release 3 A garden seedling found by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Entered into the RHS Trials in 2004.  Described as "Perfect white, no blush.  Very floriferous, pure white rounded flowers.  Jun - Aug.  75 cms."
'Hexham Whitethroat' Accepted name G. nodosum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Raised by Robin Moss. The plant has pink flower, with the white throat extending roughly half way up the petals.
'Highgates Undetermined name G. x lindavicum Name found in listing and also in Rolf Offenthal's catalogue, 1996/7.  Published description not found.
'Hilary' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'Hilary Rendall' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Plantsman's Preference nursery, 2013 A selection from Alan Bremner, with very pale pink flowers, over evergreen foliage to 20 cms tall.   A plant taken from Alan's breeding programme that produced G. 'St. Ola' and G. 'Westray'.  Flowers here smaller than G. 'St. Ola', but in more profusion.
'Hillfield Queen' Undetermined name G. pratense 'Silver Queen' Raised from seed by Alby Scriven, Australia.  Published description not found.
'Himalayanum' Rejected name G. pratense In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code: Latin form created after 1959.  No replacement name assigned.
'Hocus Pocus' Accepted name G. pratense Claire Austin Hardy Plants, 2003 Described as having "..lavender-purple flowers with dark green foliage that is tinged with bronze.  June-July, 45cms".
'Holden' Accepted name G. sanguineum Holden Clough Nursery, UK, 1972? Raised  by Mr R. Milne-Redhead, Holden Clough Nursery Bolton-by-Bowland, 1972.  Replaces invalid name G. 'Holden's Variety'
'Holden's Form' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of Article 17.15 of Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  See G. sanguineum 'Holden'
'Holden's Variety' Rejected name G. cinereum In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Variety'.  See G.  'Holden'.
'Hollywood' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Langthorn's Plantery, UK, 1990 A chance garden seedling discovered by Langthorn's Plantery, Essex.  A large cultivar, similar to G. 'Claridge Druce' in stature but with smaller leaves.  The large flowers are up to 3.8cms in diameter and have broad, overlapping petals with a strong network of magenta veins on a pale pink background.
'Hope Mountain' Accepted name G. wallichianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1999 A seedling of G. wallichianum found by Mrs Sylvia Morrow and named after a local mountain upon the flanks of which she lives.  Similar to G. 'Buxton's Variety', but with petal colour Violet Group 87B, with veins Violet Group 82B.  Flower diameter is 45-50mm.  Leaves are marbled yellow-green.
'Hot Pink' Accepted name G. endressii Heronswood Nursery, USA, 1998 A chance seedling that originated at Heronswood nursery, Washington, USA.  Bright pink flowers with somewhat felted leaves, 18" tall.
'Hungaricum' Rejected name G. phaeum Cally Gardens, UK, 1995 In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code: Latin form created after 1959. No replacement name assigned.
'Hurstbridge' Rejected name G. solanderi Unpublished name wrongly applied to plants collected in a certain area in Australia.
'Hylander' Accepted name G. x magnificum Clifton, 1979 Name assigned by Clifton for clone A shown on page 140 of Peter Yeo's 'Hardy Geraniums'.  Named after Botanist who described the hybrid.
'Ice Blue' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Vaste Planten, Holland, 1998 A chance seedling arising in Coen Jansen's nursery.  It has bluish-lilac flowers and is 45 cms tall.
'Iced Green Tea' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland and described by him as "Eighteen inches tall with green foliage with little marking.  Icy white flowers with feint veining."
'Ilja' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant named for Ilja Smit-Kroon by Maurice Vergote from Oostkamp, near Bruges, Belgiium.  Height 45 cms, spread 30 cms.  Flowers lilac-pink with darker pink veining.  Incorrectly described in the previous edition of these Registers as being introduced by Jan Spuyt, a Dutch nurseryman.
'Immaculata' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Misspelt: See G. 'Imaculée'.
'Immacule' Accepted name G. sylvaticum 'Album' Vaste Planten, Holland, 1992 A white, large flowered seedling found at Coen Jansen's nursery in Dahlfsen, Netherlands.
'Incognito' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'Indy Red' USPP Accepted name G. cinereum USPP, 2012 From Carl Lowe, UK, a chance seedling. US Plant Patent 18349 issued 25/12/2007, with comments: "characterized by its upright and outwardly spreading plant habit; freely basal branching habit; dark green-colored leaves; freely flowering habit; intense red purple-colored flowers; compared to plants of ‘Carol’ differed primarily in flower color as plants of the ‘Carol’ had purple-colored flowers."
'Ingwersen's Variety' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum "The Genus Geranium", Ingwersen, 1946 Originally collected by Walter Ingwersen on Mt. Koprivnik, Montenegro in 1929 and originally published by Birch Farm, 1930/1 as Ingwersen's Var.  Described by him as having large flowers of the clearest rose colour.
'Inverness' Accepted name G. sanguineum Inshriarch Nursery, UK, 1985 An early cultivar from Jack Drake, at the same time as G. 'Aviemore' that is still marketed in Germany.
'Irish Blue' Accepted name G. himalayense RHS Journal, CIII, 1977 Found by G S Thomas in St. Catherine's Park, Leixlip, Ireland, 1947.
'Isparta' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum GGN, 63, 1996 Cultivar name given by Peter Yeo to the plant he collected in Turkey, in the Isparta province.  More vigorous than others in cultivation, with larger leaves and a larger flower, which has a rather pale bluish pink, with a white centre.
'Ivan' Accepted name G. psilostemon? G. x oxonianum? De Bloemenhoek, Holland, 1991 Named after Ivan Louette, Belgium, its breeder.  RHS AGM awarded in Hardy Geranium Trial stage 2 2003-2005.  Described as "Mound-forming to spreading perennial, to 80   170cm in trial. Basal leaf blades to 180 x 200mm, borne on long petioles to c55cm, with short, white, adpressed hairs especially on the pedicels covered long patent hairs. Inflorescence fairly compact. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, 10 x 3mm, sparse hairs along mucro to 2mm; flowers c30mm deep reddish-purple (71C), veins towards the base forming a pale petals obovate, 20 x 8mm with vshaped notch at the apex."
'Ivybridge Eyeful' Accepted name G.psilostemon Desirable Plants nursery, UK, 2014 Raised by Julian & Sarah Sutton of Desirable Plants nursery, Totnes, Devon, who describe it as being "50 cms tall branchy plant with smaller, but more abundant, vivid magenta G. psilostem style flowers over a long summer season."
'Iwan' Rejected name G. psilostemon Misspelt: See G. 'Ivan'.
'Jack Drake' Accepted name G. sanguineum Inshriarch Nursery, UK, 1985? Replaces the invalid name G. 'Drake's Strain' .  Named after its raiser and well known nurseryman the late Jack Drake.
'Jack of Kilbride' Rejected name G. psilostemon Misspelt in version 2 of the Registers.  See G. 'Jack of Kilbryde'.
'Jack of Kilbryde' Accepted name G. psilostemon HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2001 Jack Fletcher the gardener at Kilbryde Castle, Perthshire, drew this plant to the attention of Dr Evelyn Stevens of Dunblane, who registered it.  Described as being "Larger in all its parts than the G. psilostemon as described by Yeo.  Height 150-165cms, petals 27mm x 27mm, basal leaves, 30 x 34 cms.  Flower colour RHS 78B."
'Jackie' Accepted name G. reflexum 'Katara Pass' G. phaeum 'Our Pat'? G. x monacense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2013 A seedling of discovered by Robin Moss.    Described as having "..larger, far more intense purple flowers than 'Katara Pass' and no spotting on the foliage".  Named after the owner of the garden in Northumberland where Cyril Foster, the Geranium hybridist, works and found in that garden.
'Jacqueline's Joy' Undetermined name A tentatively accepted name on the RHS horticultural database, according to Zipcodezoo.com web site.  Published description not found.
'James Haunch' Accepted name G. phaeum 'Samobor' G. phaeum 'Golden Spring' HGG Newsletter, Spring 2005 Raised by the nurseryman Jim Haunch.  Described as being "..a good mound former with leaves of a creamy yellow to almost white in the centre, red streaks and brown blotches on each side of the central vein of the leaf blades and a green with very pale almost white spash marks near the leaf tips.  The flowers are a plum-purple, contrasting well with the leaves.".
'Jan Stevens' Rejected name G. ashphodeloides Mistaken identification being the name of the collector.  See G. 'Prince Regent'
'Janet's Special' Accepted name G. pratense  Hibberd, 2003 Described as similar to G. pratense 'Striatum', but with the markings being pink, rather than blue.
'Janette' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum group    The Garden, 3/1997 The cultivar has strong green-grey foliage and is taller than the typical G. subcaulescens.  The flower appears to be intermediate between G. subcaulescens 'Splendens' and the normal horticultural G. subcaulescens.  Introduced by Bridgemere Nurseries, 1997.  UK grant 6192 given on 19/12/1995 - see Defra Gazette 5/2002 and CPVO rights by grant 1120 on 15/10/1996.  However, both were withdrawn in 2003.
'Jason Bloom' Accepted name G. psilostemon Plantsman's Preference Nursery, 2011 An introduction from Bressingham Nursery, described as having "masses of large (5-6cms) deep magenta flowers in summer. To 1.2m tall".  Standard at RHS Wisley
'Jean Amour' Rejected name G. x riversleaianum Misspelt: See G. 'Jean Armour'.
'Jean Armour' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. traversii Charter House Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by John Ross, Charter Houser Nursery.  According to RHS Trials, 2004, very similar to G. 'Mavis Simpson', but has veins on the back of its petals.
'Jean Polign' Accepted name G. x oxonianum "Lessentiel sur les Geraniums Vivaces", Evrard, 1997 A seedling originally discovered at the Jean Poligné nursery in Brittany and named after its proprietor.  Described as being "..always dwarf, never more than 25cms tall, having pink 2cms flowers with yellow anthers". 
'Jean's Lilac' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2001 A garden seedling found by Mrs Jean Purkiss in her garden at Whitehaven, Cumbria and described as being "..similar in form to G. x oxonianum 'Lacetime' but with pale lilac, unveined flowers."
'Jeffrey Newell' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia.  Published description not found.
'Jennie' Undetermined name G. cinereum group Name mentioned in "New & Unusual Plants", v4:1, 1998 and said to be bred by Carl & Janette Lowe.  Launch 2001 via Pride of Place plants, Canada.  Published description not found.
'Jennifer' Accepted name G. 'Sue Crg' seedling HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2002 A seedling of G. 'Sue Crg' raised by Mrs Annette Cutts of Bolton and named after her daughter.  The plant reminds one of its grandparent G. 'Claridge Druce', growing to some 60cms tall and 90cms wide.    A vigorous and compact grower that is very hardy.  Dark green foliage.  Flowers are up to 5cms in diameter with slight notches at apex and toothed edges.  Flower colour is RHS purple-violet group 82D, with heavy veining of RHS red-purple group 72A.
'Jenny Bloom' Rejected name G. x lindavicum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1968 A cultivar name applied to G. 'Apple Blossom' but never taken up in the market.  See Yeo.
'Jenson's Purple' Accepted name G. phaeum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A plant raised by Robin Moss of Hexham and named for his grandson. Described as being "A strong, rich purple, with foliage that is a much richer green than usual; to 60 cms tall".
'Jester' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2000 A synonym of G. 'Spring Fling', which replaces this name. Plant breeders rights apply.
'Jester's Jacket' Accepted name G. thunbergii Plant World Seeds, UK, 2002 A variegated form of G. thunbergii introduced by Plant World Seeds which they say comes true from seed.  It is described as having "in Spring..red-backed golden leaves, precede low spreading stems clad in leaves prettily spangled in red and white.  A constant succession of pink flowers...through the summer and autumn". 
'Joan Baker' Accepted name G. phaeum var. lividum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 Seedling raised by the late AWA 'Bill' Baker from a plant collected by him in Switzerland and named after his wife.
'Joan Grey' Undetermined name G. phaeum Name included in Plant Finder, 1997.  Published description not found.
'Joanna' Accepted name G. sanguineum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1999 New name to replace the invalid 'Lloyd's Form'. Named after the wife of the then proprietor of Coombland Gardens and daughter of the late Rosemary Lee who originally found the plant at Great Dixter. Described as "a very upright form, with bright magenta flowers around 4 cms across, with the plant growing to about 55 cms tall."
'Joanna' Rejected name G. phaeum Name mentioned in letter to HGG newsletter Editor.  Duplicated name.
'John Drake' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name: See G.  'Jack Drake'.
'John Elsley' Accepted name G. sanguineum Axletree Nusery, UK, 1996 Marketed by Blooms of Bressingham, 1993.  Cultivar has masses of large bright pink-purple flowers above large mounds of luxuriant foliage.  40-60cm H x 50-60cmW
'John Elsted' Rejected name G. sanguineum Misspelt:  See G. 'John Elsley'. 
'John Gibbs' Undetermined name G. cinereum group An old cultivar bred by the late John Gibbs the creator of One House Nursery, near Macclesfield.  Published description not found.
'John Innes' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "A compact and reliable plant, with flowers of pale lilace-pink, with red veins.  Flowering June - August.  Height to 10cms."
'Johnno' Accepted name G. wlassovianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A selection by Jan Lommerse from Hillegom, Netherlands, and named for his son. Described as having "Flowers a little paler that the normal form of the species, but with a diameter of 4cms.  Flowering July - September.  Height about 70cms."
'Johnson's Blue' Accepted name G. pratense G. himalayense "The Modern Florilegium", 1962, GS Thomas Raised B. Ruys, 1950, in Holland, from seed from A. T. Johnson.  AGM to be reconsidered at next trial in 2012 following RHS Stage 1 Trials, 2002-4. 
'Johnson's Variety' Rejected name G. ibericum Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. 'A. T. Johnson'.
'Johnson's Variety' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Bath & Jones 1994 Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. 'A. T. Johnson'
'Jolly Bee'  USPP, CPVO, AUS Synonym G. wallichianum G. shikokianum var. yoshiianum?? Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2001 Introduced by Marcus van Noort at his nursery in Holland. Described as "Fairly rampant spreader, 70 x 160cm wide. Foliage Yellowish Mid Green 146A, lightly mottled paler Yellow Green 146B-C. Pronounced large red stipules. Flower to 4cm, Bluish Violet 88B with light blush of Pinkish Purple 82A, veined Red 60B, petals white at base. Mature flowers becoming Pinkish Purple 82A. Flowering prolifically for a prolonged period, from early June to the first frosts."  Entered for RHS Trials Stage 3 2004-6 where it was awarded an AGM. The judges also noted that "G. 'Jolly Bee' and G. ROZANNE 'Gerwat' have larger flowers and a longer flowering season, starting earlier, than ‘Buxton’s Variety’, which is similar in colour. Flowers sometimes tinged mauve-pink early in the season. Both are also more vigorous with a low spreading habit."  CPVO plant breeders rights given to Van Noort Vast Planten, NL under grant 10484 January 2003.  These were subsequently withdrawn on 15/4/2010, as it was considered synonymous with G. 'Gerwat' ROZANNE.  Similarly, the application for Australian PBR was also withdrawn. A US Plant Patent 12148 was issued 16/10/2001 is still in force. 
'Jonah P.' Undetermined name G. sylvaticum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 One of four selections raised by Robin Moss and named for his grandchild. No description given.
'Jonathan David' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A garden seedling found by Mrs J Moore of Fulwood, Lancs., and named after her Grandson and Nephew.  Described as having "flowers with dark magenta-purple veins on a white background which fade towards the centre.  They are funnel shaped and 1.25 to 1.5 inches in diameter."  No published description found.
'Joseph Green' Undetermined name G. phaeum     HGG newsletter, Autumn 2016 A double form of the species, mentioned in an article in this newsletter by Robin Moss. It comes from Lynne Edwards. No further information available at this time
'Josephine' Undetermined name G. himalayense A plant purchased by Geert Lambrecht from a Belgian nursery.  No publication details found.
'Joy' Accepted name G. traversii var. elegans G. lambertii GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by A. Bremner and named by him after Mrs Joy Jones, Chairman, Hardy Geranium Group. Makes a mound of marbled leaves and pale pink, dark centred flowers from June until September.
'JS Anne-Marie' Rejected name G. x oxonianum The "JS" at the start of the name is incorrectly included - it is a registration mark.
'JS Matu Vu' CPVO Accepted name CPVO, 2016 Application for CPVO rights made 26/05/2015 by Spruyt Select GCV
'Jubilee Gem' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Plant in a German nursery catalogue:  David Hibberd pers comm.  Published description not found.
'Jubilee Pink' Accepted name G. sanguineum RHS Journal, 103, p68 (1978). Raised by Jack Drake, Aviemore Nursery, Invernesshire, 1975 (?) from open pollinated G. sanguineum var. striatum.  Named after Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee Year.
'Judith's Blue' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 A plant found by Robin Moss in Judith Bradshaw's (the former National Collection Holders) garden shortly before she moved away.  Described as follows "This plant has chalky slate-blue flowers, with a faint pale whitish edge to the petals.  The flowers are held on stems that reach sideways, not upwards.  The leaves are unblotched."
'Julie Brennan' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 Found in the garden of Julie Brennan, by Judith Bradshaw of Catforth Gardens.
'Julie's Velvet' Accepted name G. nodosum Hoo House Nursery, UK, 1999 Named after Julie Ritchie, proprietor of Hoo House Nursery who selected this plant from seedlings of G. nodosum 'Whiteleaf'.  A photograph is shown in "The Hardy Plant", Vol.22 No. 3, pp. 53, Spring 2001.  Flower rich red purple, flowering Jun to Sep, 45 cms tall.  
'Juliet Pink' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name:  See G. 'Juliet's Pink'.
'Juliet's Pink' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Obtained from the garden of Mrs Juliet Robinson, Hertfordshire, UK, Secretary of the Hardy Geranium Group.
'Jungfru' Undetermined name Plant available in Germany.  Published description not found.
'Jungfru Nanum' Undetermined name Plant available in Germany.  Published description not found.
'Jupiter' Undetermined name G. phaeum Collected by Will McLewin in SE Slovenia as WM9616. To be distributed by Pickmere Nurseries. Published description not found.
'Kahlua' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Nigricans' x G. traversii var. elegans) Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2001 Described as having " deep chocolate palmate leaves (which) play host to a mass of small, pink-flushed blooms. .. Height 30cms".
'Kanahitobanawa' Accepted name G. x oxonianum 'Thurstonianum' G. psilostemon? Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant raised by Sarah and Julian Sutton of Desirable Plants nursery and previously listed as 'Shouting Star'. Described as having " large, vivid magenta-purple flowers over a very long season (it's sterile) with narrow petals giving a starry effect and clearly showing the green sepals between them. The petals are dark veined with slightly toothed ends (less extremely so than in 'Thurstonianum') and the anthers are sometimes a little petaloid (again less than in its parent). In habit it's a big dome former for the border, intermediate between the parents, neither as sprawly as  oxonianum, nor as stiff and gaunt as psilostemon". 
'Kanzlersgrund' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2008. Described as "Purplish rounded funnel shaped flowers, to 60cms"
'Karen Wouters' Accepted name G. 'Chantilly' (G. gracile x G. renardii) unknown   Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 2007 Found by Mia Esser and named for Karen Wouters of Wouters Vaste Planten, Holland.  Described as "with light lavender-pink flowers and strong pink veins."
'Karis' Accepted name G. gracile G. ibericum Geranium Register, Release 2 A plant raised by Alan Bremner in the Orkneys in the 1990's by crossing the same parents as G. 'Sirak'.  Soon afterwards, it was given limited distribution under that name as it was thought to be identical.  However, it became clear during the RHS 2004 Trials that, although the plant has very similar flowers to 'Sirak', it is a much more compact plant and deserving of a separate name.
'Karl-Heinz Marx' Accepted name G. phaeum Internationale Stauden Union registration Raised by the late Karl-Heinz Marx, Germany.
'Karmijn' Rejected name G. wallichianum working name for a red seedling prior to marketing.  See: G. 'Roze Tinten'.
'Karmina' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense (G. m. 'Spessart') Ernst Pagels Nursery, Germany, 1986 Raised by Ernst Pagels in Germany and similar in appearance to G. 'Cambridge'.
'Krnten' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Staudengrtner Klose, Germany, 1992 Collected by Heinz Klose, near Mattuschka, Austria.
'Kashmir Blue' Accepted name G. pratense forma albiflorum G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' De Bloemenhoek Nursery, Holland, 1990 The plant mainly resembles G. pratense in size and leaf characteristics, but the main flowers are very large and soft , pale blue.  It flowers late May to mid-July.  Raised by Ivan Louette, Belgium in the mid-80's.  
'Kashmir Cloud' Accepted name Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 Described as having "Large mid-blud flowers  with translucent veins.  18x18 ins".
'Kashmir Green' Accepted name G. clarkei G. pratense? Vaste Planten, Holland, 2000 A seedling from Coen Jansen's nursery in Holland, which is described as being "a pure white flowered form with green veins and a small green centre.  As far as we can see, there is some G. pratense blood in it.  The leaves are less finely divided and the plant grows taller than other G. clarkei hybrids, to 50 cms.  Continuous flowering".
'Kashmir Light Blue' Accepted name G. 'Kashmir Blue' Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as having "Flowers of a lighter blue than G. 'Kashmir Blue'.
'Kashmir Pink' Accepted name G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple'  ?? Blackthorn Nursery, UK, 1990 A seedling of G. 'Kashmir Purple', raised by Mr Robin White of Blackthorn Nursery.  
'Kashmir Purple' Accepted name G. clarkei Purple-flowered Group Clifton, 1979 Named by G. S. Thomas for the 1976 RHS trial where it was Highly Commended.  Originally in cultivation at Kew as G. bergianum.  The cultivar name only applies to this plant, not to purple flowered forms of G. clarkei.  
'Kashmir White' Accepted name G. clarkei Clifton, 1979 Named by G. S. Thomas at the 1976 RHS trial where it received an Award of Merit. AGM to be reconsidered at next trial in 2012 following RHS Stage 1 Trials, 2002-4. Originally in cultivation as G. rectum.
'Katara Pass' Accepted name G. reflexum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 This plant is the one described by Yeo in "Hardy Geraniums" as being collected by the late Lionel Bacon from the Katara Pass in the Pindus Mountains, Greece.  He describes it as having "..dingy dark violet flowers and unspotted leaves."
'Kate' Accepted name G. endressii G. sessiliflorum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1985? Raised by Rev. O. G. Folkard of Sleaford, Lincs., in 1979 and named after his daughter.
'Kate Moss' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 supp. Raised by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland and named after his daughter.  A plant with very pale pink flowers with veins.
'Katherine Adele' Accepted name G. x oxonianum 'Walter's Gift' Heronswood Nursery, UK, 1997 A seed selection from 'Walter's Gift', made by Heronswood Nursery, Washington, USA.  Named after the mother of Robert Jones, a partner in the nursery.  Darker central bronzing of the leaves, silver pink flowers, veined purple
'Kaya' Accepted name G. 'Baby Blue' G. 'Midnight Reiter' Victor Reiter Group Geraniumboekje, 2012 A selection from Jan Neelen's Nursery, in the Netherlands, and named for his dog.  Described as being "A low-growing plant (up to 30cms) with greenish-bronze leaves.  Violet flowers with somewhat darker veining.  Prefers sun and will re-flower if cut back."
'Kazachstan' Accepted name G. species Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "A very beautiful plant with powder blue flowers with purplish pink veins; height to 30cms.  Flowering June to July, with a second flowering in August - September."
'Kazbegi 92' Accepted name G. ruprechtii Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant given to Karen Wouter, in Holland, by the English hybrider Cyril Foster and named after the original collection in Georgia.  Described as being "A beautiful plant with deep purple flowers, flushed pink and black stamen."
'Kew Gardens' Accepted name G. libani Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 The name given by Robin Moss for the clone described by Peter Yeo in his book "Hardy Geraniums - New Edition", page 158, as the plant he was given by Kew (Wakehurst).  This was collected  at the source of the Kidisha River, Mount Lebanon in 1974.  Yeo describes it as having "..broader leaf-divisions and lobes and broader, bluer petals" than the other material he had.  This plant has also been circulated under the invalid name 'Wakehurst'.
'Khan' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. wlassovianum? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1997 Raised by Mr Allan Robinson, Wisley Gardens.  A plant with a sprawling habit, resembling G. sanguineum.  It has large bright purplish-red flowers.
'King Penda' Accepted name G. x oxonianum (seed) G. psilostemon (pollen) HGG Newsletter, Spring 2001 A deliberate hybrid raised by Mr H. J. Mazza, of Crossgates, Leeds and named after the ancient Kingdom located in that area.  The plant is described as being "a vigorous hybrid growing to 76cms in height and flowering in June and July.  Similar to the horticultural forms of G. psilostemon, it has larger flowers up to a diameter of 5 cms, of a lighter shade of magenta.  The plant has a faint sweet aroma in warm weather."
'Kingston' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference nursery, UK, 2003/4 Garden seedling from John Hobson, who was Curator of the NCCPG National Collection at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, and distributed by Bressingham Gardens for a short while.  Described as  having "..white petals, deepening to pink with age and having a strong network of crimson veins."
'Kirsty' Accepted name G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' G. regelii HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2002 The plant was raised by Alan Bremner as a seedling of G.clarkei 'Kashmir White' and G. regelii and named by Mrs Judith Bradshaw of Catforth Gardens, the Geranium National Collection Holder, after her youngest grand-daughter.  A plant with a spreading habit, which is 50-55cms tall when flowering and making a compact plant with cut leaves.  It is more "solid" and compact than its parent G. 'Kashmir White' and taller.  It flowers May-June, retaining some flowers through July-August.  It has large, cupped flowers, almost white, with distinct veining in blue-purple.
'Klaus Schult' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2002 The plant is some 80cms tall (110cms with flower spikes), with light green basal leaves, deepening to dark green, glossy in appearance, with darker patches between leaf divisions.  Leaves 18cms at widest.  Flower diameter is 3.5 cms.  Petals are notched at apex.  Petal colour is RHS red-purple group 74B and veined (translucent lower half, not at apex).Letter from PHB Chadwick. The seedling was found amongst plants of G. 'Claridge Druce', 'A. T. Johnson' and 'Wargrave Pink' by Philip H. B. Chadwick and named after his late partner.
'Klepper' Accepted name G. phaeum Internationale Stauden Union registration Raised by Jan Spruyt, Buggenhout, Belgium (not Germany, as previously reported).
'Knighton' Accepted name G. versicolor Beeches Nursery,UK, 2007 A plant offered by Beeches Nursery, Essex, UK.  Described as having "..small white flowers with reddish veining.  Trailing stems 40 cms."
'Knigshof' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 1999 From Christian Kress, Sarastro Nursery, Austria.  Found in Sichtungsgarten für Stauden Königshof in Wilfleinsdorf/Burgenland, Austria in 1996.  Has larger flowers than G. 'Summer Surprise', though of a similar colour.  It flowers for a second time.  60cms tall.
'Kristin Jakob' Accepted name G. sanguineum Sloat Nursery, USA, 1993 Named after the botanical artist who selected this plant from a group of plants at the Sloat Nursery, San Rafael, California, in 1991.  Described as having "..big flowers, up to 4.5 cms in diameter, that look as if they are made from a magenta-red velvet, giving a deep dark purple hue, not seen in any other G. sanguineum."
'Kurt's Variegated' Rejected name G. x oxonianum A "breeder's reference' attached to G. 'Spring Fling' according to application for CPVO application.
'Lace Time' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Croftway Nursery, UK, 1992 Garden seedling from Croftway Nursery.  Described as having "very pale pink flowers heavily netted with purple veins.  Young growth is yellow tinted".
'Lacetime' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Invalid form of cultivar name. See G. 'Lace Time'.
'Laciniatum' Rejected name G. transversale An invalid latinate form used for forma laciniata.
'Lady Deborah' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in the nursery of Karen Wouters, in the Netherlands, and named after her dog.  Described as having "Dull pink flowers, with pale veining.  Height to 35 cms.  Flowering June to August."
'Lady in Black' Rejected name G. phaeum An invalid form of the replacement name 'Lady in Mourning'.
'Lady in Mourning' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Release 3, 2008 New name chosen by Registrar to replace the invalid use of G. 'Mourning Widow' which is used in the nursery trade to cover a G. phaeum with very dark flowers, red stems and unblotched leaves.  See also G. 'Dark Dream'.
'Lady Moore' Accepted name G. x oxonianum GGN, 44, 1991 Garden origin, from Lady Moore, wife of Director of Dublin BG.  A plant with very large mid-pink flowers, netted and veined.
'Lakwijk Star' Accepted name G. wlassovianum ?? Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 Correct name for plant originally put out as G. 'Lyona'. Published under the new name in the 2004 catalogue by Coen Jansen.  Described in Birgitte's book as having "..big reddish-purple flowers and dark green leaves with a hint of purple".  Found in the garden and named  after the family of Jan van Lakwijk.
'Lamb Rock' Rejected name G. cinereum Misspelt:  See G 'Lambrook'.
'Lambrook' Accepted name G. cinereum group Hibberd, 2003 Described as having "…purplish-pink, lightly veined flowers, shading paler towards the deeper centre."
'Lambrook Gillian' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Margery Fish Nursery, UK, 1993/4 A garden cultivar long cultivated by Margery Fish.  A normal G. x oxonianum with very pale pink flowers.
'Lambrook Helen' Accepted name G. subcaulescens G. subcaulescens 'Splendens'? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2005 A seedling found at East Lambrook Manor Gardens by Tom Wild, their propagator and the originator, and introduced by the proprietor Mrs Marianne Williams.  Described as having "..green foliage and being up to 20cms high, with a spread of up to 30cms.  The flower colour is deep pink which changes to a salmon pink in bright sunlight.  Flower diameter 1.25 - 1.50 cms."  Helen is the name of the originator's partner.  It is entered into the RHS trials. 
'Lancastriense' Accepted name G. sanguineum Clifton, 1979 A well defined form collected by Jack Drake from Walney Island in Cumbria.  It received an Award of Merit from the RHS as G. s. var. lancastriense "Form 2".
'Langthorn's Blue' Accepted name G. phaeum var. phaeum Langthorn's Plantery, UK, 1989 A garden seedling introduced by Langthorn's Plantery, Essex in 1987.  Flowers are similar to G. 'Calligrapher', but are slightly bluer and the foliage is not as strongly marked.
'Larch Cottage Velvet' Undetermined name G. vlassowianum A plant from Larch Cottage nursery.  No published description found.
'Lasting Impression' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 1998 A cultivar with large pink flowers which cover the plant in a non-stop display.  Erect stems are densely clothed in down, giving them a white appearance.  Makes a dense, solid, weed excluding clump.
'Laura' CPVO Accepted name G. pratense "The Plantsman", vol. 4 part 3 p 174 Described as "..a fully double, pure white flowered plant that arose from seed offered by a large seed supplier".  CPVO grant of rights 24940 made 15/8/2009.
'Laura Skelton' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Release 2 A seedling discovered by Mr & Mrs Cliff Moore of Fulwood, Lancs and being introduced by Judith Bradshaw of Catforth Gardens, Lancs.  Mrs Bradshaw describes the plant as having "large, trumpet-shaped flowers with a white background, covered with intricate purple veining.  This is heavier towards the edge of each petal, making a border and slightly lighter in the centre of each petal, fading at the base to give a white throat.  Flowers are ca. 4cms in diameter and the height of the plant is 40-45 cms.  Flowers face upwards.  Foliage plain, lightish green with the usual x oxonianum shape."  The plant is named after Mrs Moore's late sister.  
'Laurence Flatman' Accepted name G. 'Ballerina' G. cinereum var. subcaulescens Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1979 Raised by Alan Bloom, 1978 and named after his nursery foreman.  Under hot and sunny circumstances, it sometimes becomes difficult to distinguish between it and G. 'Ballerina'.  However, if kept cool and well-watered the deeper colouring of the G. cinereum subcaulescens becomes more clearly identifiable through the petals.
'Lavender Fairy' Accepted name G. pratense 'Mrs Kendall Clarke' G. pratense? (HGG newsletter, Spring 2014) A seedling found by Lise-Lotte Marker in her garden in Viby, Denmark and thought to be a cross between 'Mrs Kendall Clark' and another, unknown G. pratense.  The most distinctive feature of the plant is that the tips of each of the petals are fringed, with each tip having 6 - 8 rounded divisions.  The flowers are small compared to other G. pratense (2.5 - 3 cms in diameter), are coloured a lavender blue, paler towards the centre, and sit on long pedicels.  Flower buds are longer and narrower than normal.  Height to 90 cms.  In other respects,  the plant is very similar to the normal European form of G. pratense.
'Lavender Pinwheel' Accepted name G. phaeum Hillview Hardy Plants, 2012 According to Graham Rice's RHS blog, a plant bred by a Dutch gardener who has since died.  Described as having " the usual dark green mound of spring foliage, with maroon-purple blotches, but it’s the flowers which are special. Each flower is pale lavender, with violet veins radiating from a green eye, then the edge of each petal features a dark, picotee rim."
'Lawrence Flatman' Rejected name G. cinereum cinereum x G. cinereum subcaulescens Misspelt: See G. 'Laurence Flatman'.
'Law's Luck' Accepted name Unknown Geranium Register, Release 2 A chance garden seedling found by Elizabeth Law in her garden in Dublin.  Described by her as "Small, very pretty compact plant.  Five lobed leaves, 2.5 cms wide, divided to about one third.  Single pale green.  Flowers is cup shaped, about 1.5 - 2 cms, lovely dark pink, with pale pink edges and overlapping petals.  Purple anthers.  Flowers May to September.  sterile.  Evergreen.  Appear like 'Mavis Simpson', but smaller and more compact."
'Leed's Form' Rejected name G. sanguineum Washfield Nursery, UK, 1995? In breach of Article 17.15 of Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  See G. 'Rod Leeds'. 
'Leonidas' Accepted name G. macrostylum (not G. tuberosum as previously reported) Beeches Nursery, UK, 2007 A plant collected in the Peloponnese, Greece, by Anthony Hoog, a Dutch bulb specialist, in 1989.  Described as having "..lavender blue flowers with darker veining.  Summer dormant.  20cms."
'Libretto' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G. lambertii 'Swansdown' Catforth Gardens, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner. A white flowered cultivar.
'Light Dilys' Accepted name ?seedling of G. 'Dilys' HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 Thought to be either a sport or a seedling of G. 'Dilys'.  Described as being "..similar to G. 'Dilys', but having a lovely pale pink flower". 
'Lila' Undetermined name G. dalmaticum Name listed.  Published description not found.
'Lilac Eyes' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as "a typical sylvaticum, with lilac coloured flowers carrying eye-lash veining two-thirds of the way up the petals."
'Lilac Ice' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. wallichiabum G. ROZANNE USPP, 2012 US Plant Patent no. 21334 issued 28/9/2010, with following notes: "The following traits have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be the unique characteristics of `Lilac Ice`: 1. Compact, upright and outwardly spreading plant habit. 2. Vigorous growth habit. 3. Deeply dissected leaves. 4. Freely and continuous flowering habit. 5. Large single light purple-colored flowers with red purple- colored venation. 6. Long flowering period. 7. Good garden performance. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the parent, `Rozanne`, in flower color as plants of `Rozanne` have violet blue-colored flowers with white-colored centers and purple violet-colored venation. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium wallichianum `Buxton's Variety`, not patented. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Bressingham, United Kingdom, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Buxton's Variety` in flower color as plants of `Buxton's Variety` had light violet blue-colored flowers with white-colored centers."  CPVO application withdrawn 5/12/2009
'Lilac Lullaby' Accepted name G. pratense Beeches Nursery, UK, 2006 Introduced by Beeches Nursery and described as being "Our own selection with clusters of cup-shaped, palest lilac flowers with paler veining in late spring and early summer.  The anthers are lilac-purple and the plant has large, divided leaves."
'Lilac Shades' Undetermined name G. pratense A name tentatively given by Jean Purkiss of Cottage Garden Plants to a chance seedling found in her garden, pending evaluation.  
'Lilac Time' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Vaste Planten, Holland, 1992 Seedling at Coen Jansen Nursery, Dahlfsen, Netherlands.  Similar to the normal G. sylvaticum, but with red-lilac flowers.
'Lilacina' Rejected name G. pratense subsp pratense Cultivar gender is wrong for the specific epithet.
'Lilacinum' Accepted name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Cultivar name given to G. pratense f. lilacinum described by Ingwersen, 1946.
'Lilarose' Accepted name G. pratense De Hessenhof, Holland, 1994/5 A garden seedling, selected by Barbara Keuning.
'Lilice' CPVO Accepted name CPVO application withdrawn by Waterers on 15/10/2011.
'Lily Lovell' Accepted name G. phaeum Yeo, 1985 Raised by Mr Trevor Bath, Woking, Surrey, named after his mother.
'Lisa' Accepted name G. phaeum Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 An introduction by Coen Jansen, Holland.  The plant is described as having "..black-reddish flowers, with pale green leaves, marked with a yellow square."
'Lissadell' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Yeo, 1985 Raised by Sir J. Gore-Booth, at Lissadell, in Ireland in 1914 and then known as G. argenteum no. 2.  Originally named and published in 1930. See also G. x lindavicum 'Rubrum'.
'Lissadell Purple' Rejected name G. argenteum ssp argenteum Invalid form of cultivar name: See  G.  x lindavicum 'Lissadell' .
'Little Bead' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geranium Register A new name given by the Registrar for the plant known incorrectly as G. sanguineum 'Nanum'.  Entered by Waterpump Plants into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trials, 2004-6 where it was awarded an AGM.  Described as "Semi-evergreen plant with very low, semi-prostrate habit and flowers held above mid-green 137B, semi-evergreen foliage: height 14cm, spread 55cm. Flowering from 23 May to 15 July then sporadically to 5 October. Flowers are 4cm in diameter; pinkish-purple 78B, finely veined purplish-red 61A/B with small white patch at base of petals."
'Little Boy' Accepted name G. phaeum GGN, 42, 1991 A seedling found by J. Boterdael in Belgium in a friend's garden.  Described as only half the size of the normal plant with a very "ramified" rootstock and is easily divided.  Flowers are purple-brown and foliage is unspotted.
'Little David' Accepted name G. psilostemon G. sanguineum 'Minutum' (?) Axletree Nursery, UK, 1996 Raised by Alan Bremner.  A 25 cms tall, small leaved plant with reddish purple flowers produced during the summer.  
'Little Devil' Rejected name "Plant Finder", 1997 Misspelt:  See G. 'Little David'
'Little Gem' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. traversii Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by Alan Bremner, 1990.  Darker flowers than 'Russell Prichard'.
'Little John' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Plantsmans Preference, 2015 A plant introduced by John Tuite.  Described as "small plants producing masses of tiny magenta-pink flowers over dark green leaves.  30 cms".  From photographs the petals are narrow and widely spaced, with netting of a darker colour and a white eye.
'Lizabeth' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum group CPVO, 2002 Described as having "Soft pink flowers with a trace of darker veins from early June to at least the end of July.  Height 20cms".  UK Plant Breeders Rights given to Carl & Carol Lowe under grant number 6943  on 1/6/1999 but withdrawn.
'Lloyds Form' Rejected name G. sanguineum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1996 In breach of Articles 17.15 ('Form') and 22.6 (raiser's agreement) of the Cultivated Code. See G. 'Joanna'.
'Lohfelden' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Staudengärtner Klose, Germany, 1985 Collected from the wild by Heinz Klose.  Named after the town in which his nursery is based.  Very similar in effect to G. x cantabrigiense 'Biokovo', with its relatively small leaves and white petals - see RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp342.
'Lolke' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found by Lolke de Jong in his garden in Drachten, Netherlands, and named for him by Frida Waasdorp.  Described as  having "White flowers with a  pale pink blush, becoming more pink with age.  Leaves green."
'Lolke's Geel' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Found by Lolke de Jong in his garden in Drachten, Netherlands and named for him by Rein ten Klooster.  Described as "A nice, erect plant with a height of 50 cms.  Flowers are white with a touch of yellow.  East to divide."
'Luscious Linda'  USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. x antipodeum CPVO, 2005. US Plant Patent 17901 issued 7/8/2007, with comments: "characterized by its outwardly spreading, trailing and mounded plant habit; green-colored foliage; freely and uniformly flowering habit; long flowering period; purple violet-colored flowers; compared to ‘Tanya Rendall’ it differed in the following characteristics: Plants were smaller than ‘Tanya Rendall’; it had green-colored foliage whereas ‘Tanya Rendall’ had brown-colored foliage;  they differed slightly in flower coloration. Compared to ‘Dusky Crug it differed in that it had a more trailing and mounded plant habit and ‘Dusky Crug’ has creamy white-colored flowers.”  CPVO grant 15727 issued to Orkney Perennials 20/06/2005, but withdrawn 15/6/2009. 
'Lutzie' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1998 A seedling from G. 'Claridge Druce', with large deep pink flowers, a white throat and deep rose red veins.  Named after the grandmother of the Nursery's owner.
'Luzie' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Mispelt in initial version of Register.  See G. 'Lutzie'
'Lydia' Accepted name G. yesoense Rosie's Garden Plants, UK, 1998 Described as "Large pale lavender-mauve flowers, deeply divided leaves, 30cms tall, rich red autumnal colouring.  RHSCC Purple violet 81c to 81d.  Comes true from seed."
'Lyona' Rejected name Name invalidly applied by nurseryman against originator's wishes.  See: G. 'Lakwijk Star'.
'Madelon' Accepted name G. psilostemon   Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 A garden seedling from one of  the nursery's customers.  Described by them as "..having very small flowers, some 1 - 1.5 cms across, in vibrant carmine.  80cms tall".
'Madrona' Accepted name G. endressii (or G. x oxonianum) "My experienence in growing Hardy Geraniums", Noble, 1994 A seedling found by Phoebe Noblein Canada and described as having "..pink flowers, heavily veined with mauve".  It is not clear whether it is a G. endressii seedling or a hybrid.
'Mae Clintock' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Invalid form of cultivar name and misspelt.  See G. 'David McClintock'.
'Magenta' Rejected name G. wallichianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Purely adjectival so treated as invalid
'Maggie's Delight' Accepted name G. phaeum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1994 A chance seedling found in her garden by  Mrs Margaret Nimmo-Smith, Cambridge, 1986 and introduced by Monksilver nursery.  It has leaves edged and netted creamy yellow with dark nerves and purple-blue flowers.
'Maitre Hugo' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple' Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2002 Described as having "deep lilac slightly cupped flowers all summer.  45 cms tall. Flowering May to July."  Raised in Belgium.
'Major' Rejected name G. phaeum var lividum Name replaced by 'Majus' by Peter Yeo to correct case in Latin in accordance with Cultivated Code.
'Majus' Accepted name G. phaeum var. lividum Yeo, 1985 Name used to replace 'Major' by Peter Yeo to correct case in Latin in accordance with Cultivated Code.
'Marchant's Ghost' Accepted name G. phaeum Marchant's Hardy Plants, 2005 A plant distributed by Graham Gough of Marchant's Hardy Plants, Laughton, East Sussex.  Described as having "...ghostly, pale grey-lavender flowers the texture of sating.  75cms tall".
'Margaret' Undetermined name G. phaeum       Found a few years ago in a Gloucestershire garden by the National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss and described by the seller as being "..a hybrid with grey-pink flowers." No published description found.
'Margaret Hunt' Synonym G. phaeum A plant being propagated by Larch Cottage Nursery.  Very similar to G. 'Margaret Wilson' and thought by Robin Moss to be the same plant, in which case it would be a synonym.  Both 'Maggie's Delight' and Margaret Wilson' have the same pale reticulation.  
'Margaret Paris' Undetermined name G. cinereum group A plant developed by the late Joe Elliott and distributed amongst his friends.  Published description not found.
'Margaret Wilson' Accepted name G. phaeum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1997 A plant introduced by Axletree nursery in 1989.  It shares the same pale reticulation as 'Maggie's Delight', but has bluer flowers and a tidier habit.
'Margin of Error' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1991 A chance seedling found by Langthorn's Plantery in Essex, with leaves carrying a narrow gold margin and flowers like G. 'Claridge Druce'.
'Maria' Undetermined name G. sessiliflorum Shown in Plant Finder, 1999 as offered by Byeways Nursery.  Published description not found.
'Marijke' Accepted name G. nodosum Geranium Register, release 3  A plant raised in Holland with pale rose-lilac, semi-double petals.  Petals have dark veins running from the centre to about half way up the petal.
'Maroon Monarch' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs.  Decribed as being ".. similar to normal G. phaeum plants but with larger, dark maroon flowers, with a pronounced sheen."
'Marshmallow' Accepted name G. pratense Cotswold Garden Plants, UK, 2015 A plant from Jan Bates.  Described as being "Nice dark rose, madder-flushed divided foliage, red stems and soft pale pink single flowers, llined with darker pink, coral stamens.  60 cms".
'Martha' Accepted name G. wallichianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 A plant from Geert Lambrecht, the Belgian Geranium grower and breeder, named after his grandmother.  Robin Moss described this plant as "..heavily veined, a reddish centre zone, a pale white central zone and a pale blue outer ring.  Similar to G. 'Chrystal Lake' but that one has a much wider white zone and a lilac outer zone."
'Martha Vandendriessche' Accepted name G. clarkei? ?? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 A seedling found in the garden of Geert Lambrecht (a keen geranium grower) in Belgium and named after his grandmother. Said never to have been in circulation.  Described as having "lilac/pinkish flowers with a faint vein."
'Mary Mottram' Accepted name G. endressii G. sylvaticum 'Album' "The Hardy Plant", v14.2, p76 Garden origin from the late Mary Mottram's Devon nursery, originally marketed (in error) as G. endressii 'Album'.  Thought to be similar to G. 'Trevor's White'.
'Master Charles Wilson' Accepted name G. sylvaticum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A seedling of G. sylvaticum 'Greek Fire' raised by Robin Moss of Hexham and named for his grand-son. Described as being "more vigorous than its parent, at 70 cms tall, with strong reddish-pink, veined flowers".
'Master Charlie Wilson' Undetermined name G. sylvaticum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 One of four selections raised by Robin Moss and named for his grandchild. No description given.
'Master Niall Lawon' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2013 A low-growing, to 18" (45cms), plant with lilac pale blue flowers with narrow veins to half the petal length.  Flowering over a long period.  Introduced by Robin Moss, who found the seedling inside an old roller in his garden, and named for his third grandson.
'Mavis Simpson' Accepted name GGN, 6, 1982 A chance seedling at RBG Kew, found by Mr Cook, the Garden Supervisor, and named after a member of the Alpine staff.  According to RHS Trials, 2004, not G. x riversleaianum.  Also, found to be very similar to G. 'Jean Armour', but distinguished by no veining on back of petals. Entered by Glebe Cottage Plants and Hillside Cottage Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM.  
'Max Frei' Accepted name G. sanguineum Hans Frei Nursery, Germany, 1976 Seedling found in the alpine garden of Max Frei in Wildensbuch, Switzerland.  A small form of G. sanguineum with purplish-red flowers.
'Maxwelton' Accepted name G. psilostemon G. x oxonianum 'Wargrave Pink' Charterhouse Nursery, UK, 1991 A hybrid raised by John Ross, Proprietor of Charterhouse Nursery, 1985.
'Mayflower' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1973 Raised by Alan Bloom, Bressingham Gardens.
'McClintock' Rejected name G. endressii Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. ' David McClintock'.
'McClintock' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'David McClintock'?
'Melanie Pitkin' Accepted name Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1994 Raised by Michael Pitkin at Viburnum Nurseries, Sydney and named after his daughter.
'Melinda' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. endressii G. sylvaticum 'Mayflower' USPP, 2012 A chance seedling of Antonius Rinjbeek.  US Plant Patent 19506 issued 25/11/2008, with comments: "Plants of the ‘Melinda’ are larger and more upright than plants of the cultivar ‘Mayflower’. Plants of ‘Melinda’ can be compared to plants of Geranium sylvaticum ‘Meran’, which has blue lavender-colored flowers, whereas ‘Melinda’ has light pink-colored flowers with red purple-colored venation."  CPVO grant 24934 made 15/8/2009. 
'Melody' USPP, CPVO, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum USPP, 2012 US Plant Patent no. 21690 issued on 1/2/2011, with following notes: "Plants of the new Geranium have not been observed under all possible environmental conditions. The phenotype may vary somewhat with variations in environment and cultural practices such as temperature, daylength and light intensity without, however, any variance in genotype. The following traits have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be the unique characteristics of `Melody` 1. Upright and outwardly spreading plant habit. 2. Strong growth habit. 3. Freely basal branching habit. 4. Freely flowering habit. 5. Red purple-colored flowers. 6. Good garden performance. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the parent selections primarily in flower color. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of the Geranium cinereum `Carol`, disclosed in U.S. Plant Pat. No. 14,124. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Holsworthy, Devon plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Carol` in flower color as plants of `Carol` had purple-colored flowers."  CPVO grant 30478 made 15/8/2011.  Canadian PBR withdrawn 30/12/2014.
'Memories' CPVO, USPP, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group CPVO, 2006 A chance seedling found by Carl Lowe in his nursery in Newport, Shropshire, England, in 1999.  Named in memory of plantsman Aad Zoet. CPVO grant 17467 issued on 22/5/2006.  US  granted Plant Passport issued 30/01/2007 under licence number 17394.  According to USPP application the plant can be compared to G. 'Carol' from which it differs "by not having purple flowers but red-purple flowers with dark purple venation (fully opened upper surfaces are RHS N74A/B, with N79A venation) and a long flowering period." Canadian PBR granted 13/12/2010.
'Menna Bach' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. farreri? Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 2003 A spontaneous hybrid occurring in a batch of seedlings at the Crûg nursery, the seed parent being clear but the pollinator is assumed to be G. farreri by its habit.  Described as being "..a distinct, long-flowering hybrid, having a short and moderately suckering habit to 25 cms tall, with small pale green, five-lobed leaves and good sized bright pink, open flowers, veined darker near the centre of the undulating petals". It is named after Bleddyn Wynn-Jones' mother, with Menna being her name and Bach being the Welsh for small.
'Meram' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Misspelt:  See G. 'Meran'
'Meran' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Heinz Klose Nursery, Germany, 1972 Collected by H. Klose from the South Tyrol, Italy, 1968.  Flowers are a beautiful dark purple.
'Meryl Anne' Accepted name G. x oxonianum? Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2002 A hybrid raised by Susan Rowe, of Ceredigion, Wales and described as having "large soft pink flowers with curled back petals.  60cms"
'Mia Esser' Accepted name G. cinereum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A plant given to Mia Esser, former Chairman of the Dutch Pelargonium & Geranium Society, by Cyril Foster, the English hybridiser, in 1997.  Described as being "a robust plant with dark pink flowers with purple veins and a small purple centre where the veins meet.  Loose grey-green leaves with long stems. "
'Michael Pitkin' Undetermined name G. phaeum Raised in 1989 by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia and named after himself.  Published description not found.
'Michael's Mauve' Accepted name G. wallichianum Hommes et Plantes, 2012 Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia and included in an article by Dr Evrard, French National Collection holder as one of the better forms of the species.  Essentially, the normal form of the species but with flowers that are lavender-blue.
'Michael's Mauve' Undetermined name G. wallichianum Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia and named after himself.  Published description not found.
'Michael's Pink' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1993 Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia and named after himself.
'Midnight Blues' USPP Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Thierry Delabroye catalogue, France, 2008 According to the "New Perrenial Club: "Low mounds of glossy purple-black leaves that hold their colour well throughout the season.  Cup-shaped flower of violet-blue."  Selected by Thierry Delabroye from Victor Reiter Group seedlings.  US Plant Patent no.22455 issued 20/1/2012 with following notes: "`Midnight Blues` exhibits foliage that is dark purple in color. 2. `Midnight Blues` exhibits large blue flowers. 3. `Midnight Blues` exhibits large leaves, sturdy leaves. 4. `Midnight Blues` exhibits a vigorous growth habit in relation to typical dark-foliage Geranium cultivars. `Midnight Blues` can be closely compared to its probable parents plants. `Midnight Blues` differs from `Midnight Reiter` in having leaves that are darker purple in color, larger in size, and sturdier. `Hocus Pocus` differs from `Midnight Blues` in having foliage that becomes green in the center of the foliage in summer and in having flowers that are light purple in color with white centers."
'Midnight Clouds' USPP Accepted name G. pratense 'Midnight Reiter' (probably) G. pratense unknown cv Victor Reiter Group USPP, 2012 A chance seedling found by Luc Klinkhamer in the nursery of Kees van der Aardwegh in the Netherlands in 2007.  It has brown foliage and grows to 35-40 cms tall and flowering June and July.  Flowers are slightly cup-shaped, white with translucent veins, and have separated petals. US Plant Patent no. 22456 issued 10/1/2012 with following notes: "`Midnight Clouds` differs from cultivars of its likely parent species in having larger and stronger leaves. `Midnight Clouds` can be most closely compared to `Midnight Reiter` (not patented). `Midnight Clouds` differs from `Midnight Reiter` in having larger and stronger leaves, in having greater resistance to powdery mildew and in having white-light pink flowers rather than lavender-blue. `Midnight Clouds` can also be compared to `Hocus Pocus` (not patented). `Hocus Pocus` differs from `Midnight Clouds` in having a more compact mounded plant habit and in having light purple flowers."
'Midnight Reiter' Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Hibberd, 2003 A seed strain developed from original G. 'Victor Reiter' material.  Described as having "..beetroot-coloured leaves with greyer undersides and deep blue flowers."
'Midnight Reiter Strain' Rejected name G. pratense In breach of Article 2.5 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the word 'Strain'.  See Victor Reiter Group.
'Midnightlyona'(CPVO) Accepted name G. pratense   CPVO, 2016 Application made for CPVO rights 15/12/2014 by Johannes van Lykwijk. Name replaces previous choice of G. 'Lakwijkpurple'. See also G. PURPLE GHOST.
'Mierhausen' Accepted name G. phaeum Glebe Cottage Plants, UK, 1995? Described as close to the species, but with paler flowers, slatey with large pale centres.  Flowers rounder than the type, close in shape to G. phaeum 'Album'.  Raised in Germany, but details not known.  
'Milk Cow Blues' Accepted name G. pratense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A Robin Moss selection from G. pratense seedlings.  Described as "growing to 80cms, with large pale milky blue flowers".
'Milou' Accepted name G. pratense 'Midnight Reiter' G. pratense  forma albiflorum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A hybrid produced by nurseryman Jan Neelen in the Netherlands and named for his daughter.  Described as having "whtie flowers with a purplish pink veining, which makes them look pale pink.  Foliage brown."  Plant patent applied for.
'Minutum' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code: Latin form created after 1959. See G. sanguineum 'Droplet'.
'Miriam Rundle' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Raised by John Hobson at Littleport, Cambs, 1991.  A normal G. x oxonianum with reddish-purple flowers.
'Mirjam' Accepted name G. x antipodeum 'Sea Spray' G. subulato-stipulatum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found by Frans van Dongen in his garden at Zevenbergschen Hoek, Netherlands.
'Miss Connie Wilson' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A plant selected by Robin Moss and named after his grand-daughter.  Described as "60cms tall, with pink/pale mauve flowers with a white eye."  Picture in Autumn 2012 newsletter
'Mistique' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 Described as having "White flowers with pale pink veins.  15 x 24 ins".
Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A cultivar from the Bijzondere Vaste Planten in Holland.  Described by them as having "…pale lilac and white flowers with pale green foliage".
'Misty Morn' Accepted name G. pratense Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2001 Raised by Cyril Foster in Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as having "pale grey-blue semi-double flowers - choice, 70cms"
'Misty Rose' Accepted name G. thunbergii The Hardy Plant, Autumn 2002 Discovered growing on the slopes of Mount Fuji, Japan, by Mrs Jane Sterndale-Bennett.  Described as having "..a succession of small pink flowers, with a darker pink reverse.  Each petal has darker pink lines spreading from the base.  The pollen is blue.  The flowering stems elongate during the summer to cover an area of about 60cms.  The leaves vary in size and degree of speckled variegation."  The seed was obtained from Japan under the invalid name G. t. rosea variegata.
'Misty Samobor' Accepted name G. phaeum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Raised by Beth Chatto. A seedling of G. phaeum 'Samobor', with similar leaf markings but pale pink flowers.
'Mojito' Accepted name G. phaeum 'Margaret Wilson' Cotswold Garden Plants, UK, 2015 A plant from Thierry Delabroye.  A seedlilng from G. 'Margaret Wilson', with grey flowers and yellow striped foliage.  Flowering April-June, height 2cms.
'Mojmir' Undetermined name G. palustre Name found in listing and also in Rolf Offenthal's catalogue, 1996/7.  Published description not found.
'Molly Grills' Accepted name G. 'Ballerina' G. 'Giuseppii' Lambley Nurseries, Australia,  1997 Raised by David Glenn, Lambley Nurseries, Victoria, Australia and named after a local lady from Ascot.
'Money Peniche' Accepted name G. palustre Ellebore, France, 1994 Dark crimson pink flowers, some 2.5cms in diameter, flowering from June to the first frosts.
'Mont Asci' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum Listed in the Sarastro catalogue without adequate description.  Collected by Pia Rudolf in Montenegro.
'Moorland Dylan' Accepted name G. phaeum 'Samobor' Moorland Cottage Plants, 2007 A seedling, thought to be of G. 'Samobor', found at Moorland Cottage Plants, Wales.  Described as having "..very large leaves with a blackish central zone and other leaf spotting. The flowers are larger than most phaeum varieties and are dark purple black, overlaid with dark violet. They are nearly as dark as G. 'Mourning Widow' (more correctly G. 'Lady in Mourning') and twice the size.  Height x Width: 1m x 1m."
'Moorland Jack' Accepted name G. psilostemon "The Plantsman", NS V7 (1): p.65, 2008 A seedling which arose at Moorland Cottage Plants, Pembrokeshire.  Described as being "..a vigorous, spreading cultivar with young leaves variegated cream and pink and the occasional double flower".
'Moorland Jenny' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Moorland Cottage Plants, 2007 A plant that originated at Moorland Cottage Plants, Wales. Described as having "..young leaves suffused red with a narrow green margin. As the leaves age the red area shrinks. The funnel shaped, dark veined salmon pink flowers are borne profusely.  Height x Width: 60cm x 80cm."
'Moorland Star'  Accepted name G. x oxonianum Moorland Cottage Plants, 2007 A plant that originated at Moorland Cottage Plants, Wales. Described as having "..new leaves flushed red with crimped, white edges, maturing to glossy green with a large red central zone and further red spotting. The flowers are borne in profusion and are tiny pink stars with twisted petals.  Height x Width: 60cm x 80cm."
'Moortown Pink' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 A new cultivar described as having "..yellowish blotched foliage with paler pink flowers (than G. 'David Martin' or G. 'Alec's Pink').
'Moran' Undetermined name A plant growing in the Chicago Botanic Gardens,  who say they received it from Heinz Klose.   However, Klose says that he does not know of it.  See also G. 'Meran'.  Published description not found.
'Mottisfont Rose' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 From Joan Taylor (and described by Robin Moss as the best he has recently seen) a plant with "..large flowers on a vigorous plant, rosy pink in colour".  Picture in the Newsletter, which also shows a paler eye. 
'Mount Olympus' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum "Plant Finder", 1997 Working name,  prior to allocation of cultivar name.  See G. 'White-Ness'.
'Mount Olympus White' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum "Plant Finder", 1997 Working name,  prior to allocation of cultivar name.  See G. 'White-Ness'.
'Mount Stewart' Accepted name G. clarkei? Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 A chance seedling found at Mount Stewart garden, Northern Ireland. Flowers white, with pink flush and deep pink veins, coalescing into basal pink blotch. 
'Mountain Magic' Accepted name G. himalayense G. pratense Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs.  A back cross of G. pratense.  Described as being "..similar to G. 'Spinners', but with veined flowers."
'Mountain Mist' Accepted name G. himalayense 'Irish Blue' Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs.  Described as being "..intermediate between the parents but with the pale, mist blue flowers of G. 'Irish Blue'."
'Mourning Widow' Rejected name G. phaeum phaeum In breach of article 17.13 of the Cultivated Code: Use of common name. See G. 'Lady in Mourning'
'Mrs Charles Perrin' Accepted name G. x monacense (or G. phaeum?) Margery Fish Nursery, UK, 1993 A selection made at East Lambrook Manor.  Mauve-pink flowers with a paler eye, slightly ruffled edges to the petals.
'Mrs Jean Moss' Accepted name seedling from G. 'Tidmarsh' Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2008. A seedling selected by Geranium expert Robin Moss, in the UK, and named after his wife.  Described as "Erect clumps with rich pink-purple flowers, without an eye, in summer.  Very dark foliage.   60cms".
'Mrs Judith Bradshaw' Accepted name G. gracile G. renardii 'Whiteknights' HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 A hybrid from Alan Bremner, named after the former National Collection holder and released by Robin Moss.  Described as having "Lovely yellow-green foliage crinkled like G. renardii.  Pink flowers are veined to 3/4 of the petal length and it grows to 30ins."
'Mrs Kendal Clark' Rejected name G. pratense Misspelt: See G. 'Mrs Kendall Clark'.
'Mrs Kendall Clark' Accepted name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Given by a friend to Walter Ingwersen, pre 1946.  Previously published as var. Mrs Kendall Clark by Ingwersen, 1946.  Entered by Margery Fish Gardens and Waterpump Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where its AGM was re-confirmed.
'Mrs Kendall Clarke' Rejected name G. pratense Misspelt: See G. 'Mrs Kendall Clark'
'Mrs MacMasters' Accepted name G. himalayense Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1999 A normal G. himalayense with large blue flowers and reddish veins.
'Mrs Molly Kisby' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as being a "..blowsy, big form with salmon-pink/orange flowers carrying petals reflexed at their tips."
Mrs Withey Price Rejected name G. phaeum Wrongly spelt version of name given in original publication.  See 'Mrs Withey-Price'.
'Mrs Withey-Price' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Found and introduced by Jerry Flintoff and named for Charles Price and Glenn Withey of Seattle, in 1994. A yellow-green flush to new leaves which change to mid green as they mature, with small red internodal blotches; flowers reflexed, mid lilac with a mauve ring and a white centre.
'Mrs Wright' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A plant obtained by Dutch collector: Dr Geert Lambrecht pers comm.  Published desciption not found.
'Muldoon' Accepted name G. x monacense nothovar. monacense Clifton, 1979 Name suggested by Richard Clifton in 1979 for the plant which had been in circulation for many decades as G. punctatum hort., an invalid name.  
'Mull' Undetermined name G. pratense Shown in the Plant Finder, 1997, as offered by Buckland Nurseries.  Published description not found.
'Music From Big Pink' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "..big, pale grey-pink flowers, without veins.  Some flowers darken with age."
'Mytikas' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Internationale Stauden Union registration Collected by Franz Praskac, a nurseryman, of Tulln, Austria, and named after the Greek mountain upon which it was collected in 1990.  Entered by Jan Spruyt nursery, Belgium, into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 3 2004-5 where it was awarded an AGM.  Described as "Low mat forming, vigorous, 40 x 150cm wide. Leaves 3.5 x 4cm wide, Yellow Green 146A. Single flower, to 2cm, Purplish pink N78B, 84C eye, petals flat to reflexed, slightly overlapping with a shallow notch. Anthers 180B, style and stamens 71B. Flowering prolifically from 15.5.06 to 20.6.06, peaking during the first two weeks of June."
'Nancy Lindsay' Rejected name G. endressii or G. x oxonianum? Clifton, 1979 In breach of article 21: No descriptive information of cultivar published.  
'Nanum' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code:  Latin form created after 1959. See G. sanguineum 'Little Bead'
'Natalie' Accepted name G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' G. saxatile GGN, 64, 1996 Raised by Alan Bremner.  This cultivar has powder blue flowers on a 40cms tall plant.  Flowers more freely than the G. saxatile
'Nepal form' Rejected name G. pratense In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Nepalense' Rejected name G. thunbergii In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code:  Latin form created after 1959.  No replacement name assigned.
'Neptune' Accepted name G. erianthum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1990 The cultivar name given by David Hibberd of Axletree nursery to the plant referred to in Yeo as "Easily the finest stock grown at Cambridge", which originated from seed sent to them from Upsala University BG, Sweden, received previously from Sapporo BG, Japan.
'New Dimension' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group USPP, 2005 US Plant Patent granted 15941 issued 6/6/2005.  USPP application says that this is a whole plant mutation of 'Victor Reiter', discovered in Vinhega in Holland.  Described as having "upper surface of developing foliage colour RHS 137A/139A; Upper surface of opened petals RHS 87A/87B." CPVO Rights application rejected 15/08/2005. 
'New Hampshire' Rejected name G. sanguineum Heronswood Nursery, USA, 1998 One of four conflicting names.  See valid form G. 'New Hampshire Purple'.
'New Hampshire Purple' Accepted name G. sanguineum ISU list Raised by Joe Eck, North Hill Garden Design, Vermont.  One of three conflicting,  similar names.  This one chosen by Registrar as the correct one.  (see also 'Hampshire Purple', 'New Hampshire' and 'Purple Flame')
'Niccola' Rejected name ? Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Misspelt:  See G. 'Nicola'
'Nicola' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. psilostemon Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 Raised by Alan Bremner. Similar to 'Patricia' but has widely separated petals, giving it a starry effect.
'Nicola Jane' Accepted name G. x riversleaianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Plant originated by Peter Adams, the father of Richard John and Nicola Jane Adams, in whose Mixbury garden it arose.  Described as having "Long-trailing, grey-green leaves forming a plant up to 1 metre across, giving an appearance of a plant of G. x antipodeum.  Flowers pale pink with pink veins and a green centre. Good in hanging baskets."
'Night Heron' Rejected name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group A working name used by Heronswood Nursery, USA, to cover seedling from Victor Reiter Group.
'Night Time' Accepted name G. phaeum Croftway Nursery, UK, 1997 A cultivar with dark slate purple flowers and darkly blotched foliage.  60 cms tall.
'Nightshade' Undetermined name G. phaeum Being offered by Sarastro Nursery, Vienna, but no published description found. According to the National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss, it appears to be very close to G. 'Night Time', originally from Croftway Nursery.
'Nighttime' Rejected name G. phaeum Misspelt: See G. 'Night Time'. 
'Nigricans' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum subsp. novaezelandiae The Plantsman Nursery, UK, 1967 The name adopted by Yeo for the dark leaved form of this species.
'Nijssen' Undetermined name G. malviflorum Plant in Gärtnerei Simon catalogue, 1997.  Published description not found..
'Nikita' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Heronswood Nursery, USA, 1998 A chance seedling that occurred in the nursery.  Medium blue, white eyed flowers, fresh green, deeply lobed, foliage.  Named after their pet Spaniel who died in 1994.
'Nimbus' Accepted name G. clarkei 'Kashmir Purple' G. collinum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1990 A chance seedling raised on the research grounds of Cambridge Botanic Gardens, 1979. Entered by Waterpump Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM. 
'Nipponicum' Rejected name G. yedoense Botanical var of G. yesoense, not a cultivar.
'Nodbeauty' CPVO Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter G. pratense 'Mrs Kendall Clark' Victor Reiter Group Gardening Which, UK, 2002 Described as "Emerging in spring, with jagged, almost black, palmate foliage, fading to deep purple-bronze.  It flowers in flushes from April to Autumn, bearing clusters of violet-blue flowers.  Height and spread, 40cms x 30cms."  Thought to be a selection from the G. 'Victor Reiter' seed strain. ' CPVOs Rights licence 15661 granted 6/6/2005.  See also G. BLACK BEAUTY a market designation for the plant.
Nogeone (CPVO) Accepted name G. wallichianum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 26/01/2016 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortazur' CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum   CPVO 2011   Application for CPVO rights made August 2011 by Marco van Noort B. V. Considered not filed by CPVO February 2012.
'Noorthava' CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum Described as having "..yellow/green foliage with large flowers - mid to pale blue outer segment, a white eye which is heavily veined, giving the effect of an inner red corona".  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights 32906 granted 15/2/2013.  See also G. HAVANA BLUES
'Noortlil' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 12/12/2014 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortjjcor' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 26/01/2016 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortjjhpi' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 27/01/2016 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortjjrasp' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 26/01/2016 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortnight' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 12/12/2014 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortpur' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 12/12/2014 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortsal' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 12/12/2014 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Noortvio' (CPVO) Accepted name G. cinereum   CPVO 2016   Application made for CPVO rights 12/12/2014 by Marco van Noort Breeding BV.
'Nora Bremner' Accepted name G. rubifolium G. wallichianum 'Buxton's Variety' GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by Alan Bremner and named after his mother.  Described as having "Soft violet-blue, white-centred flowers, with well separated, veined petals, borne well above a mound of marbled leaves.
'Nordlys' Accepted name G. nanum G. argenteum 'Rubrum' HGG Newsletter, Spring 2000 Raised by Ole Olsen in Norway, the name being the Norwegian word for the Aurora Borealis ("Northern Lights").  Described as having "green foliage, similar to G. nanum both in shape and size.  Flowers 2cms in diameter, similar to G. 'Ballerina', but with pink veining and without the darker central area.  Height ca. 5-10 cms.
'Nordmann' Undetermined name G. gracile Name found.  Published description not found.
'Norman Warrington' Accepted name G. robustum Hannay's of Bath Nursery, UK, 1996 Collected in South Africa by Hannays of Bath 1989/91.  Description in catalogue.
'Noortazur' CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum CPVO, 2011 Application for CPVO rights made August 2011 by Marco van Noort B. V.  Considered not filed by CPVO February 2012.
'Northumberland Lavender Queen' Accepted name G. clarkei HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A seedling from Robin Moss.  Described as "60cms tall, with lavender flowers".
'Nortlil' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum CPVO, 2014 Application for CPVO rights made December 2014 by Marcus van Noort breeding B. V.
'Noortnight' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum CPVO, 2014 Application for CPVO rights made December 2014 by Marcus van Noort breeding B. V.
'Norton Delight' Rejected name G. sessiliflorum x G. traversii? Working name prior to assignment of cultivar name.  See G. 'Pink Delight'.  
'Noortput' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum CPVO, 2014 Application for CPVO rights made December 2014 by Marcus van Noort breeding B. V.
'Noortsal' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum CPVO, 2014 Application for CPVO rights made December 2014 by Marcus van Noort breeding B. V.
'Noortvio' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum CPVO, 2014 Application for CPVO rights made December 2014 by Marcus van Noort breeding B. V.
'Nova' Rejected name Geraniumboekje, 2012 Latinate form created after 1959 in breach of article 17.9.
'Numwood Purple' Rejected name G. pratense "Plant Finder", 1997 Misspelt: See G. 'Nunwood Purple'
'Nunnykirk Pink' Accepted name G. x antipodeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2006 A Cyril Foster plant (which he did not like) which was passed onto Cally Gardens Nursery by Robin Moss.  A plant being sold by Manor Nursery Plants in the UK in 2003 and in the French National collection.  Described as having "..trailing stems which form a 20cms deep carpet of bronze-green foliage, topped with masses of pale pink flowers in late summer'.  
'Nunwood Purple' Accepted name G. pratense forma albiflorum G. himalayense 'Gravetye' Charter House Nursery, UK, 1989 Raised by John Ross, Charter House, 1988.
'Nyewood' Accepted name G. sanguineum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1994 A dwarf form with bright purple flowers and small dark green leaves.  Low growing and fast spreading.
'Nyewood's Variety' Rejected name G. sanguineum Invalid form of cultivar name.   See G. 'Nyewood'. 
'Nymphenburg' Undetermined name G. viscosissimum Plant in Gärtnerei Simon catalogue, 1997.  Published description not found..
'Oh My God Pass' Accepted name G. multisectum?  Coll. No. DBG121 Heronswood Nursery, USA, 1998 Collected by Panayoti Kelaideis (DBG121) of the USA on a mountain pass of the same name in South Africa.  Finely dissected, silvery grey foliage, many soft pink flowers.
'Okey Dokey' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 An improved selection of G. 'Hocus Pocus'.  Described as being "A beautiful  Geranium with foliage that emerges dark burgundy in spring, turning to deep purple through the season.  Blue flowers that do not overlap."
'Old Blue Eyes' Accepted name G. platypetalum hybrid Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 Plant entered into RHS Wisley Geranium Trials, 2004 by Robin Moss, who describes it as "Relatively low-growing, with smokey blue-veined flowers with a violet-purple centre".
'Old Rose' Accepted name G.x oxonianum 'A. T. Johnson' G. versicolor Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Selected by Allan Robinson from seedlings found at his parents' Robinson's Greencourt Nursery, 1983/4
'Olympos' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Internationale Stauden Union registration Collected by Franz Praksac, a nurseryman of Tulln, Austria in 1990 and named after the Greek mountain where it was collected.  Described as "20-30/25-35 cm high; leaves small, only 5 cm in diameter, quite incised, with narrow lobes, little hairy; flowers 3 cm; blooming period is May -July."  Third in the ISU awards in 1996/7 
'Onahoz' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum Raised at the nursery of Greete Peterson, Lynge, Denmark.  Thought to be one of the magenta-pink forms, such as 'Bevan's Variety' - See RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp 342 . Published description not found.
'Orchid Blue' Accepted name G. bohemicum Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2004 A seed selection from Thompson & Morgan, UK.  Described as "A short-lived border and ground cover plant which self-seeds to keep continuity. Masses of 2cm (¾in.) flowers of orchid-blue, veined in purple-violet, borne on bushy plants Flowers summer. Height 30-45cm (12-18in)."
'Orion' Accepted name G. 'Brookside' G. ibericum? Les Jardins d'en Face, France, 2000 A sterile hybrid from Brian Kabbes' Dutch Nursery.   Pratense-like leaves, very large dark blue flowers.  Height 60- 80cms.  Believed that PBR may be applied for. Entered by Coen Jansen, Holland, into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM.
'Orkney Blue' Accepted name G. ibericum subsp. jubatum G. gymnocaulon Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 2003 A hybrid by Alan Bremner.  The plant's distinguishing feature is described as being "…the darkness of the heavily veined blue flowers, which are intermediate in size and shape to the parent plants, as are the leaves".
'Orkney Cherry' USPP Accepted name G. x antipodeum G. x oxonianum USPP, 2007 A hybrid developed by Alan Bremner under his formal breeding programme.  The plant grows to a height of 25 cms, with a diameter of 30 cms.  The foliage is brown (RHS N187A an dN146A).  Flowers are slightly funnel-shaped, with bright, slightly notched, cherry pink petals (RHS N74A), with a white eye.   US Plant Patent 18263 granted 4th December, 2007 under this name.  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights grant 22921 made on15/8/2008 under the name "Bremerry".  Thus, the plant takes the cultivar name G. 'Orkney Cherry' through priority and 'Bremerry' becomes a synonym.
'Orkney Dawn' Accepted name G. peloponnesiacum G. renardii Crug Farm Plants, UK, 2003 A hybrid by Alan Bremner.  Described as having "Dark veined and centred blue flowers are produced over many weeks on 40cms branching stems, held well above the contrasting wrinkled leaves.  With more than a hint of G. renardii, they emerge a bright yellow and slowly fade to pale green over the growing season.".
'Orkney Flame' Accepted name G. psilostemon G. x oxonianum   Beeches Nursery, 2015 A hybrid bred by Alan Bremner and named by Robin Moss to link it to it's breeder who is based in the Orkneys.  Said to be "...closer to   the first parent, with bold rosettes of very large, dark green, wrinkled leaves reminiscent of crocodile skin.  Very large, cerise-purple flowers with a black eye during midsummer.  Height to 110cms."
'Orkney Mist' Accepted name G. pratense G. collinum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 An Alan Bremner hybrid and one of a number of forms of that cross, being released by Robin Moss.  Described as being "..very floriferous to 36ins, with very pale lilac unveined flowers: the other two forms of the cross (G. 'Harmony', G. Distant Hills') are veined and darker in colour.  Its crowds of flowers look great with 'Brookside' or G. psilostemon forms and hybrids".
'Orkney Pink' Accepted name G. x antipodeum G. x oxonianum Cally Gardens, UK, 1993/4 Raised by Alan Bremner and named after his home island.  A three was cross using the 'Nigricans' form of G. sessiliflorum. Described as having "..dark pink flowers from summer to autumn, above a dense carpet of chocolate-purple foliage." 
'Our Pat' Accepted name G. phaeum New, Rare & Unusual Plants 8 (1): 100, 2003 A plant found and named by Marie Addeyman in her sister's garden and introduced by Susie White's local nursery at Chollersford.  Described as "Upright and free standing, 110 x 90cm wide. Foliage Yellow Green 146A, stem spotted with Brown 200D. Flower to 12 x
16cm wide, Dark Purple 79A/B, silvery white at base of petals. Long flowering; presents flowers and stands well; good sized and colour blooms. Submitted by Robin Moss to the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials Stage 3 2004-6 where it was awarded an AGM.
'Pagoda' Accepted name G. sinense G. yunnanense HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1990 Raised by Alan Bremner.  The shape of the flower as it aged reminded him of the shape of the roof of a pagoda.
'Pale Blue Yonder' Accepted name G. erianthum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 Found by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland in his garden.  Described as being "A pale blue, non-veined form of the species.  18 inches to 2 feet tall".
'Pale Form' Rejected name G. endressii In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Form'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Pale Irish Blue' Accepted name G. himalayense Cally Gardens, UK, 1997/8 A seedling from G. 'Irish Blue' raised by Michael Wickenden, the proprietor of Cally Gardens.
'Palustre Plus' Rejected name G. palustre Washfield Nursery, UK, 1992 Invalid form of cultivar name:  See G. 'Tidmarsh'. 
'Pamir' Rejected name G. saxatile "Plantfinder", 1999 A cultivar offered by Hillside Cottage Plants.  It has now been determined that this name belongs to G. saxatile (see Yeo, 2002)
'Pannonia' Accepted name G. phaeum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 A seedling found by Christian Kress of Austria in the Wilfleinsdorf trial-gardens, Eastern Austria.  Described as having "yellow leaves with brownish red markings, and pale lilac flowers". 
'Pascal' Undetermined name G. nodosum A plant circulates under this name, with flowers similar to G. 'Whiteleaf'.  However, no further details are known.
'Pastel Clouds' Rejected name Plant World Seeds, UK, 2002 Invalid, plants do not meet requirements of Cultivated Code 2.2.  They are not "Distinct, Uniform & Stable", as flower colour varies from "..palest pink to deepest blues".
'Pat Bender' Accepted name G. psilostemon Geraniaceae Nusery, USA, 2006 Described as being "A semi-double form of G. psilostemon with petals a little larger and slightly ruffled.  Magenta flowers with a black centre.  36x48 ins".
'Pat Smallacombe' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 A seedling of garden origin, from Pat Smallacombe's garden, Devon.  Very large, mid-pink flowers.
PATRICIA Marketing designation G. endressii G. psilostemon Marketing designation for G. 'Brempat'.  
'Patricia Josephine' Accepted name G. x oxonianum ? Claire Austin Plants Ltd., UK,  1998 The plant has soft silvery-pink flowers, fading almost to white with age, carried above thick and vigorous mid-green foliage. 60cms tall, flowering all summer.
'Pearl Boland' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 From Dan Heims and Terra Nova Nursery, Oregon, USA.  A vigorous, dark green leaved, form with dense foliage.  Flowers white changing to deep rose as they age, with a satin sheen.   Sterile.  18 x 36"
'Peer' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Found in her garden by Mia Esser and named by her.  Described as having "Pink flowers with distinct veining, similar to G. versicolor, but thicker.   Height to 30 cms.  Flowering June to September."
'Penny Lane' CPVO, USPP, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group CPVO, 2005 A chance seedling found by Carl Lowe at his nursery in Newport, UK.  CPVO Licence 17468 granted on 22/05/2006.  US Plant Patent granted 14/6/2007 as PP17393.  USPP application says that its best comparator is G. 'Carol', from which this cv. can be separated by the fact that "it has darker purple coloured flowers.  Fully opened petals upper surface coloured RHS N78B, towards the base close to 155D; venation N79C."  Canadian PBR no. 3981  granted 13/12/2010
'Perfect Storm' Accepted name G. traversii, G. sessiliflorum plus two others Fairweather Nursery, 2006 A four way hybrid between G. traversii, G. sessiliflorum and two other species created by Alan Bremner.  Described as being "A prostrate hybrid, with pinky-magenta flowers, heavily veined from a dark central eye, with velvety grey foliage".
'Perry' Accepted name G. himalayense Clifton, 1979 Raised Mr Perry, 1927.   Name given by Richard Clifton to replace 'Perry's Variety'. Originally published by Stormonth 1928, where it was described as being "A splendid blue form".
'Perry's Variety' Rejected name G. himalayense Invalid form of cultivar name:  See G. himalayense 'Perry'.
'Persian Carpet' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Nigricans' x G. traversii var. elegans) Plant World Seeds, UK, 1997 A range of seed producing similar plants with varying colour of flowers offered by Plantworld seeds.  NB disscusion regarding Group names.
'Peter Hale' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Mead Nursery, UK, 2007 A plant raised at The Mead Nursery, Wiltshire, UK and named after a local plantsman.   It is a G. 'Thurstonianum' type and is described as having ".. a slightly trailing habit, with rich pink starry flowers for months in summer. Trails nicely over the edge of a pot. 30 cms."
'Peter Yeo' Accepted name G. x magnificum Clifton, 1979 This name was assigned by Clifton to clone C shown on page 140 of Peter Yeo's original version of his book "Hardy Geraniums", also shown on the cover of the reprint, the one with wider petals.  However, in describing the cultivar, Clifton mistakenly added "notched and pipped at their tips".
'Phantom' Accepted name G. x oxonianum  Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2008. Described as having "Leaves heavily zoned and spotted dark brown, bright pink flowers".
'Phantom of the Opera' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A seedling found in the garden of Robin Moss.  Described as having "Purplish-pink flowers, with a light eye, over foliage which is variegated on some leaves giving it a ghostly appearance.  2ft tall".
'Philipe Vapelle' Rejected name Misspelt in previous version of the Register.  See 'Philippe Vapelle'
'Philippe Vapelle' Accepted name G. renardii G. platypetalum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 A deliberate hybrid raised by Ivan Louette in Belgium and named after a friend (or his Grandfather?).  An identical plant was raised by Alan Bremner and circulated under the same name.  (NB erroneously spelt on previous version of this publication)
'Phillipe Vapelle' Rejected name New, rare & Unusual Plants, V3 11/1997 Misspelt: See G. 'Philippe Vapelle'.
'Phoebe Noble' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1993 Found growing in the garden of Phoebe Noble and named for her by Elke and Ken Knechtel of Rainforest Gdns, British Columbia, 1993.
'Phoebe's Blush' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1995 A chance garden seedling named by Robin Moss, 1993.  A standard G. x oxonianum with very pale pink flowers.
'Picotee' Accepted name G. pratense Vaste Planten, Holland, 1996/7 Found by a customer of Coen Jansen's in the Schwarzwald, Germany.  Large pale blue flowers, white centre, remontant. 
'Piet's White' Rejected name In name invalidly applied to G. 'Kashmir Green'.
'Pindus' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Collected in Pindus Mountains, Greece, by the late  AWA 'Bill' Baker, 1980.  Campared to G. 'Velebit' this plant has exceptionally bulbous, shiny and rather conspicuous calyces behind bright magenta-pink petals and brightly coloured filaments. - see RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp 342.
'Pink Buxton' Accepted name G. wallichianum Darwin Plants, 2005 Introduced by Darwin Plants and described as having "..pink flowers in various shades, some with white centres".  Marketed in Europe under invalid cultivar names 'Roze Tinten' and 'Karmijn'. May be a synonym of 'Chadwell's Pink'.
'Pink Carpet' Synonym Synonym of P. 'Flower Carpet'
'Pink Delight' Accepted name G. x antipodeum? G. x oxonianum? Elworthy Garden Plants, UK, 1998 A chance seedling raised by Mrs Juliet Robinson, past Secretary of the Hardy Geranium Group.  Described as having "bushy mounds of grey-green leaves over which rise abundant pink flowers with deeper veins.  June-September."
'Pink Eye' Accepted name G. cinereum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Seedling found in Mia Esser's garden in the Netherlands and named by her.  Described as being "Similar to G. 'Rothbury Gem', but with pale pink flowers with pink veins and a pink eye."  
'Pink Ghost' Accepted name G. pratense 'Purple Haze' Plant World seeds, UK, 2006 Described as being "A long awaited and distinct colour-break from G. 'Purple Haze'.  Pale pink flowers are highlighted perfectly by the darker foliage, this effect being especially noticeable as light fades in the eveningl.  Occasional seedlings may revert back.".
'Pink Lace' Accepted name Plant World seeds, UK, 2004 Described as being "..this strikingly lined and pencilled (flowers), throughout spring and early summer.  18-24ins tall".
'Pink Pearl' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs.  Described as being ".. A more compact and robust form of such seedlings and with green leaves."
'Pink Penny' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Syabru'  G. 'Jolly Bee' USPP, 2007 A seedling found growing in the nursery of Marcus van Noort, in Holland, after repeated sowings of pink flowered forms of G. wallichianum.  The US application states that it is distinguished "by its large flowers (avg. diameter 3.5 cms), coloured pink with dark purple veining, blooming from mid--May until late September in Holland.  Foliage is prostrate, medium green with lighter green marbling."  US Plant Patent granted 24/4/2007 under grant number PP17656.  CPVO application withdrawn 15/02/2007.
'Pink Spice'  AUS, CPVO, USPP,  CAN Accepted name G. x antipodeum Lambley Nursery, Australia, 1997 Raised in New Zealand at a nursery in Tauranga as a result of repeat sowings and selections.  The final seedling that was chosen had large, deep pink flowers and purplish green foliage.   Australian PBR grant 930 given 30/9/1997, but terminated 10/11/2011.  CPVO rights grant 5527 issued on 6/12/1999.  US Plant Patent 12172 issued October 2001.  Canadian PBR grant 1050 made 12/10/2001, but revoked 18/2/2009 USPP description says that "its growth habit varies due to amount of sunlight but that generally it is low and spreading via annual runners.  Upper side of petals Purple Group 77B, with 77D on margins, green-white eye.  Under side Red-Purple Group 74C/B."  .
'Pink Splash' Accepted name G. pratense Plant World seeds, UK, 2004 Described as "..having white flowers with radiating pink streaks.  Occasionally, a pure pink or white plant may occur.  24-30ins tall".  NB discussion regarding Group names.
'Pink Strain' Rejected name G. sanguineum In breach of article 2.5 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Strain'.  No replacement name assigned.
'Pitkin's Pink' Undetermined name G. himalayense Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia and named after himself.  Published description not found.
'Plenum' Accepted name G. himalayense Clifton, 1979 Originally published in 1928 by J. Stormonth as G. grandiflorum plenum.  Erroneously given the name 'Birch Double' at the RHS trials in 1976 where it was given an Award of Merit.
'Plenum' Accepted name G. maculatum Clifton, 1979 Originally published in RHS Encyclopaedia, 1956, as var. plenum. 
'Plenum' Rejected name G. sanguineum Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1979 In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code:  Latin form created after 1959.  No replacement name assigned.
'Plenum Album' Accepted name G. pratense Yeo, 1985 A very old cultivar that was published as var. album fl. pl. by Ingwersen, 1946.
'Plenum Caeruleum' Accepted name G. pratense Yeo, 1985 A very old cultivar that was published as var. caerulea fl. pl. by Ingwersen, 1946.
'Plenum Purpureum' Rejected name G. pratense Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum'.  See Yeo.
'Plenum Violaceum' Accepted name G. pratense Yeo, 1985 A very old cultivar that was published as var. fl. pl. by Ingwersen, 1946. Entered by Hardy's Cottage Garden Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where its AGM was re-confirmed.
'Ploeger de Bilt' Rejected name G. phaeum This is not a name used by Ploeger de Bilt themselves, but refers to plants raised through their seed.
'Plus' Rejected name G. palustre In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code:  Latin form created after 1959.   See G. 'Tidmarsh'. 
'Pope's Purple' Rejected name G. pratense A working name now replaced by the final choice of name.  See G. BLACK BEAUTY = 'Nodbeauty' PBR EU
'Porters Pass' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum subsp. novaezelandiae County Park Nursery, UK, 1992 A form of the species with distinctly red foliage.
'Porter's Pass' Rejected name G. sessiliflorum subsp. novaezelandiae County Park Nursery, UK, 1995? The correct name according to maps of the area should not include the apostrophe.
'Possibility' Accepted name G. phaeum Internationale Stauden Union registration Raised by Armand Kremer, Würselen, Germany.
'Postman's Jubilee'  Accepted name G. dalmaticum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Raised by Jose de Buck, Chairman of the Flemish Hardy Plant Society, Eeklo, Belgium.  Described as "A carpet forming rock garden plant with a height of 10 cms.  The pink flowers rise well above the foliage."
'Prado' Undetermined name Name found in listing.  Published description not found.
'Prelude' Accepted name G. albiflorum G. sylvaticum Catforth Gardens, UK, 1994 supp Raised by Alan Bremner.  The plant combines the foliage of the first parent (G. albiflorum) with the blue flowers of the second (G. sylvaticum).
'Prestbury Blush' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1994 A hybrid raised by John Anton-Smith and named after his home village of Prestbury in Gloucester.
'Prestbury Red' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Of garden origin, raised by J. Anton-Smith, Prestbury, Gloucs.  Published description not found.
'Prestbury White' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1993 Wrongly stated name in original publication.  See G. 'Prestbury Blush'.
'Prichard's Hybrid' Rejected name G. traversii Ingwersen, 1946 New diagnosis as G. x riversleaianum 'Russell Prichard'.
'Pride of Zegge' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in the garden of Mrs Corry Lambregts at Zegge, near Roosendaal, Netherlands and named by Rein ten Klooster.  Described as having "Irregularly formed flowers (diameter 1.5cms) with a dirty-white colour.  A compact growing plant with a height of 35 cms.  Unusual rather than beautiful.  Flowering June-July."
'Priestley's Pink' Undetermined name Name shown in Plant Finder, 1997.  Published desription not found.
'Priestling's Red' Undetermined name G. endressii (or G. x oxonianum) Believed to have been raised by Rosemary Verey.  Published description not found.
'Prima Ballerina' Accepted name G. cinereum group Staudengärtner Klose, Germany, 1990 Raised by Heinze Klose; a sport from 'Ballerina'
'Prima Donna' Accepted name G. pratense G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' Catforth Gardens, UK, 1993? Raised by Alan Bremner. Has soft blue flowers and at 75cms tall is more self supporting than the G. pratense parent.  Flowers from May to August.
'Primadonna' Rejected name Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. 'Prima Donna'.
'Prince Regent' Accepted name G. asphodeloides subsp. asphodeloides Axletree Nursery, UK, 1990 Obtained by Mr Jan Stephens from Mrs B. C. Rogers as G. pallens and passed to Peter Yeo at Cambridge in 1970 (For details see "Hardy Geraniums" pp 130).   Subsequently named by David Hibberd of Axletree Nursery.
'Prince Rupert' Rejected name G. ashpodeloides Invalid form of cultivar name:  See G. 'Prince Regent'
'Prionia' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Internationale Stauden Union registration Collected by Franz Praksac, a nurseryman of Tulln, Austria, and named after the Greek mountain where it was collected.  It does not have hairs on the leaves.
'Prostratum' Rejected name G. sanguineum Botanical var. not a cultivar name.  See G. sanguineum var striatum.
'Prostratum' Rejected name G. lancastriense Botanical var. not a cultivar name.  See G. sanguineum var striatum.
'Punctatum' Rejected name G. phaeum Incorrect diagnosis. This is 'punctatum of gardens'. see G. x monacense.  
'Purple Flame' Rejected name G. sanguineum "Garten Praxis", 4/1999 p 26 One of four conflicting names.  See valid form G. 'New Hampshire Purple'.
PURPLE GHOST     Application for CPVO rights made 26/05/2015 by Spruyt Select GCV
'Purple Haze' Rejected name G. pratense Incorrect form of the name G. 'Purple-haze', under which the cv. was first published by Plant World Nursery.
'Purple Heron' Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2001 A selected clone from the Midnight Reiter seed strain, described as having "...very dark black-burgundy leaves and violet flowers.  45 cms tall."
'Purple Moon' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2013 A seedling found by Robin Moss in his garden.  Said to be "A large very vigorous plant, to 110cms, with heavily marked foliage and dark purple flowers.  Possibly 'Samabor' crossed with 'Our Pat'".
'Purple Passion' USPP, CAN, CPVO, AUS Accepted name G. x antipodeum USPP, 2012 A hybrid by the Deans, NZ from G. traversii elegans and G. sessilifolium.  US Plant Patent 19157 issued 26/8/2008, with notes: "characterized by its purple-colored flowers, purple-colored foliage, and rosette growth habit., in side by side comparisons, plants of the new cultivar differ from plants of `Pink Spice` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new cultivar have a flower color different from of `Pink Spice`; and 2. Plants of the new cultivar have a foliage color different from plants of `Pink Spice`."  Canadian application for PBR withdrawn 31/3/2008.  CPVO grant 30483 made 15/8/2011.  Australian PBR grant made May 2009, terminated 28/8/2013
'Purple Pillow' USPP, CPVO, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group USPP, 2002 A hybrid developed at Bridgemere Nurseries, Cheshire.  Similar in form to other G. cinereum, but with unique, bright purple-red flowers (Upper side of petals RHS 71A, slightly darker veining;  lower surface 70A/B according to USPP application). US Plant Patent PP12829 issued 6th August, 2002.  CPVO grant applied for 15th August, 2002 under name 'Ravpil', but subsequently rejected.  Canadian PBR granted 3/3/2006 (Licence 2399) under name of G. 'Purple Pillow'.    NB The name G. 'Ravpil' was previously considered the correct name for the plant.  However, recent evidence shows that G. 'Purple Pillow' has priority.
'Purple Rain' Accepted name G. 'Nimbus' seedling Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A seedling found in the garden of Robin Moss.  Described as having "Golden-yellow foliage when young, with smaller pinker flowers than G. Nimbus".
'Purple Silk' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2003/4 Cultivar name assigned to the purple-flowered form of G. p. var. stewartianum, to distinguish it from bluer flowered forms.  The leaves are dark green and the flowers come much later than 'Elizabeth Yeo'.
'Purple-haze' Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2001 A seed strain developed from the G. 'Victor Reiter' seed strain.  Described as having ". foliage with a..bronze-purple hue.. deepest in shade during spring, gradually changing to ..deep green with strong purple edging.  ..blooms..of..violet-mauve."  Selections are made by choosing darkest leaved seedlings.
'Purpur' Undetermined name G. nodosum Name found in listing and also in Rolf Offenthal's catalogue, 1996/7.  Published description not found.  
'Purpurea Plena' Rejected name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum'.
'Purpureum' Undetermined name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as having "Purple-brown flowers, over leaves with clear, dark spots.  Height to 60 cms."  A plant that is widely grown in continental Europe from Austria to the Netherlands. Not known to have been published before 1957.
'Purpureum' Accepted name G. subcaulescens Arends, "Mein leben als Gärtner und Züchter", 1940 A plant raised from multiple seeds selections by Georg Arends in the 1930's and marketed in 1937.
'Purpureum' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Ingwersen, 1946 Raised originally in Germany in the early 20th century, by Franz Sündermann.  Thought in some circles to be the true origin of G. x lindavicum 'Lissadel'. 
'Purpureum' Rejected name G. argenteum Misdiagnosis of specific epithet.  See G. x lindavicum 'Purpureum'.
'Purpureum' Undetermined name G. phaeum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Accepted by the ISU in the 1980's, listed and on Sarastro Nursery list, Austria, 1998 and circulating in the Netherlands post 2000.  It is described as having "Purple-brown flowers with a white centre.  Leaves have clear dark spots.  Height to 60 cms. "  it is not known whether the cultivar predates 1959 and is therefor valid as a latinate name.  
'Purpureum Plenum' Rejected name G. pratense Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum'.
'Purpureus' Rejected name G. cinereum "Géranium Vivaces", 1997 An invalid form of G. x lindavicum 'Purpureum'.
'Purpurrot' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum Name found in listing.  Published description not found.
'Putnam County' Accepted name G. maculatum Storkenaeb, v2, 2012 Introduced by Plantsman's Preference nursery, Diss, Norfolk 2012 and collected in Putnam County, New Youk State.  Described as having "pink-mauve flowers on 50 cms stems.  Typical wild form". 
'Queen of Hearts' Accepted name G. cinereum group Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2001 Raised by Cyril Foster in Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as having "pale, pinky-white flowers, with dark central blotch".
'Rachel's Rhapsody' Accepted name G. phaeum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 2003/4 A seedling found by Rachel Etheridge.  The cultivar has dark green leaves randomly splashed and spotted with yellow.  There are also red marks in the leaf axils and it has purple flowers.
'Raina' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum Purple Flowered Group Yeo, 2001 From wild collected seed from Dr Raina, a botanist from India, and sent to Peter Yeo at Cambridge.  Described as "having veins darker than the background colour of the flowers".  (see also invalid use of name)
'Raina' Rejected name G. clarkei Coombland Gardens, UK, 1993? This name applies to a plant of G. pratense var. stewartianum collected by Dr Raina for Yeo, not to the plant of G. clarkei collected by him.
'Rainbow' USPP, CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum CPVO, 2006 US Plant Patent 18968 issued to Hans Kramer, NL, 24/6/2008, with comments: "characterized by its upright and broadly outwardly spreading plant habit; basal branching growth habit; freely flowering habit; purple violet, purple and light purple tri-colored flowers with dark purple-colored venation; compared to ‘ Buxton Blue’ it differed in flower color as plants of the cultivar Buxton Blue had blue and white-colored flowers. In addition, plants of the new Geranium are more compact than plants of the cultivar Buxton Blue."  CPVO Rights granted under licence number 22746 15th August, 2008. 
'Rainer' Rejected name G. clarkei Coombland Gardens, UK, 1993? Change of name from original publication under Article 29.2 of the Cultivated Code.  The name should be that of the originator of the seed Dr Raina.  See G. 'Raina'.
'Rainforest Cloud' Accepted name G. phaeum Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1994 A chance garden seedling, with silvery foliage, tinged with mauve, and flowers that appear grey.  Originally from a British garden.
'Rambling Robin' Accepted name G. incanum G. robustum  Rambling Robin Group Axletree Nursery, UK, 1996 A chance seedling raised by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  
'Raven' Accepted name G. phaeum  Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1998 A seedling of G. 'Lily Lovell', introduced by Rainforest Gardens, BC, Canada.  Said to be similar to G. 'Little Boy', but with purple-blotched leaves.
'Ravpil' CPVO Synonym G. cinereum group Thompson & Morgan, UK, 2001 CPVO rights applied for 15th August 2002 but rejected June 2004.  See also G. 'Purple Pillow'. 
'Ray of Light' Accepted name G. phaeum 'Album' G. phaeum 'Samobor' The Garden, May 2012 A new introduction in 2011 by Plantsman's Preference nursery, UK.  A flat faced, pure white form, with overlapping petals and a very small red eye, with short red veins.
'Ray's Pink' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Plant World Seeds, UK, 2002 Described as "Profuse sprays of icing-pink flowers…are produced in midsummer.  Height 24-30 inches".
'Rebecca' Accepted name G. traversii var. elegans G. cinereum group GGN, 45, 1992 Raised by Alan Bremner and named by him after Miss Elaine R. Bullard.
'Rebecca Moss' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Raised by Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland and named after his daughter.
'Red Admiral' Accepted name G. psilostemon G. sylvaticum 'Baker's Pink' Catforth Gardens, UK, 1999 Raised by Cyril Foster in Rothbury, Northumberland.  Deep red-pink flower with dark red centre and veining, 18" to 24" high, flowering June to Sept.
'Red Cloud' Accepted name G. 'Nimbus' ?? Geranium Register, Release 2 Raised by John Hobson fo Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs.  A seedling of G. 'Nimbus'.  Described as having "..light green, finely cut foliage, similar to G. 'Nimbus', but with dark pink flowers'.
'Red Dwarf' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. 'Porters pass' x G. x oxonianum 'Wargrave Pink') Charter House Nursery, UK, 1992 Raised by John Ross, Charterhouse Nursery.  Named after a popular TV series.
'Red Madder' Undetermined name Plant in RHS Wisley Geranium Trials, 2004.  Published description not found.
'Red Propellers' Accepted name Plant World Seeds, UK, 2004 An hybrid made in the nursery between two unamed species.  The description says that it "..smothers itself with flowers, but few seeds.  The flowers come in two deep rose forms….the petals of the first are intriguingly "squilled", whilst those of the second are like slightly gapped, "propeller" blades".  NB discussion regarding Group names.
'Red Robin' Accepted name G. sanguineum     HGG newsletter, Autumn 2016 A plant raised by Robin Moss of Hexham. Described as "having the reddest flowers of this group, not the normal dull magenta".
'Red Sceptre' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having "Bright red, strappy, thin petals.  Flowers larger, petals longer and redder than G. x oxonianum 'Coronet'."
'Red Sputnik' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Plantsman's Preference Nursery, UK, 1996/7 Similar form to the common cross of this type, but with narrow petalled flowers in magenta crimson.
'Reg Kaye' Undetermined name G. pratense Discovered by the late Reg Kaye, of Silverdale Nursery, on a railway line near Carnforth, Lancs. Published description not found.
'Reginald Farrer' Accepted name G. sanguineum var. striatum Clifton, 1979 Replacement cultivar name for the invalid name G. 'Farrer's Form'.  Given the Award of Merit at the RHS trials in 1976 as G. s. var. lancastriense Form 1.  Described as "..combining compactness (20cms tall) with dark green leaves".
'Reinrosa' Accepted name G. dalmaticum Hans Frei Nursery, Germany, 1990 A selection of the well known species circulating in Germany, having been introduced by Hans Frei.  Flowers smaller than the type and they are blue tinted.
'Rhapsody' Accepted name G. cinereum group Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Jack Drake Alpines, Inshriarch Scotland in 2002.  The plant has dark green foliage and forms a fairly large G. cinereum type plant.  Its flowers are dark pink, with black veins and with some white showing through the pink.  It has a black "eye".
'Richard John' Undetermined name G. x riversleaianum Published description not found. Plant originated by Peter Adams, the father of Richard John and Nicola Jane Adams, in whose Mixbury garden it arose.  Marketed by the Nursery Further Afield.  Very similar to G. 'Russell Prichard', "..but good in hanging baskets"!  Sister plant to G. 'Nicola Jane'.
'Richard Nutt' Accepted name G. sylvaticum G. pratense Yeo, 1985 A natural hybrid found by the late Richard Nutt in the Alps, submitted to the 70's RHS Geranium Trials and later presented to Cambridge University Botanic Garden.  This was described by Yeo as having "..leaves similar to those of G. sylvaticum but with slightly deeper teeth, and very crowded, upwardly inclined flowers with rather short peduncles and often almost no pedicels.  The petals are white with a pale lilac network and have hairs all across the front surface at the base of which is drawn out into a point to a greater extent than in either supposed parent.  The fruits do not develop."
'Ridsko' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Bath & Jones, 1994 Flowers are a pale magenta-pink, of a rather distinctive rounded form and held well clear of the rather shiny leaves, which are almost completely deciduous in the winter, revealing the unusually exposed and rather dark stems and rhizomes - see RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp 342.  
'Ring of Fire' Accepted name G. phaeum Heronswood Plants, USA, 2003 A chance seedling of G. phaeum.  Described as follows ".. made its arrival known by a flash of golden yellow foliage in spring, accentuated by a central zoning of bright red.  The flowers of reflexed pink petals."
'Out of the Blue' Undetermined name Published description not found.  Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plant Finder, 2002.
'Pennine Cloud' Undetermined name G. pratense A plant from Mrs Fiona Gifford of Pennine Perrenials of Alston, Cumbria and  provided to the RHS Geranium Trial in 2004.  No published description found.
'Rise and Shine' CPVO Accepted name G. wallichianum CPVO, 2009 A selection from Marco van Noort, NL.  CPVO grant 30484 made on 15.8.2011.  Described as being "Masses of white-eyed cobalt blue flowers, each laced with magenta-pink veins, top lush mounds of much-divided foliage from early summer until the first frosts. As the flowers age, they take on a rich pinkish hue, adding further interest throughout the season. Its low, spreading habit makes it ideal for the front of the border, or cascading over the edges of a pot".
'Rise Top Lilac' Accepted name G. phaeum Cottage Garden Plants, 2004 Introduced (and probably raised) by the late Trevor Bath of Usual and Unusual Plants in the mid '90's and named after the cottage where he lived at the time.  Described as having "..paler lilac flowers than other G. phaeum cultivars."
'Robert Burns' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. traversii var. elegans Charter House, UK, 1990 Raised by Mr John Ross, Charter House Nursery and named after the Poet.
'Robin's Angel Eyes' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A plant selected by Robin Moss having a large white centre with a blue-purple outer halo.
'Robin's Beauty' Undetermined name G.sylvaticum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 Raised by Robin Moss, but no description available.
'Robin's Blue' Rejected name G. wallichianum Working name prior to assignment of cultivar name.
'Robin's Choice' Accepted name G. phaeum Geraniaceae nursery, USA, 2006 A plant raised by Mia Esser, Holland.  Described as having "Lavender and white flowers with ruffled petals that are almost fringed.  18x20 ins".
'Robin's Ginger Nut' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant introduced from his garden by Robin Moss, Hexham, Northumberland.  Distinguished from other G. x oxonianum cultivars by the masses of strappy orange/salmon pink petals.  Trialled in the RHS Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 2, 2003-5, without award.
'Robin's Grey Beard' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as being "a relatively low-growing form of G. pratense, with pale, grey-blue flowers".
'Robin's Rascal' Accepted name G. sanguineum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 A plant entered into the RHS Geranium Trial, by Robin Moss from his garden.  Described as "Low-growing with veined purplish-pink flowers that have distinctive ruffling to all edges."
'Robin's Red Eye' Accepted name G. oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland who describes it as "Fifteen inches tall, with flowers that have reddish, strap shaped petals, with a circular white central eye". 
'Rod Leeds' Accepted name G. sanguineum Vaste Planten, Holland, 1996 A seedling from Rod Leeds, Sudbury, Suffolk given to Washfield Nursery.  Originally distributed as 'Leeds Form', now corrected.  Flowers pinkish-purple (RHS 78A), veined dark purple (RHS 83A).  20 cx 50cms.
'Rdbylund' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 A plant  obtained from the Bakkerly nursery in Denmark by a number of foreign nurserymen under the name G. 'Rose Clair', but clearly not that cultivar.  Passed by Maria Ell, of Nürnburg, Germany to the Sarastro nursery in Austria where this name was chosen as a replacement.  Described as being "..a typical x oxonianum type, but with deep pink flowers".  
'Rohina Moss' Rejected name G. x oxonianum "Plant Finder", 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name:  See G. 'Rebecca Moss'.
ROLF'S ROYCE Marketing designation G. sanguineum 'Ankum's Pride' G. psilostemon Marketing name used in Belgium and the USA for G. 'Tiny Monster'.
'Romany Pink' Undetermined name A plant entered into the RHS Trials by Croftway Plants.  Published description not found.
'Rosalina' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense HGG Newsletter, Spring 1999 Seedling found by Christian Kress in a garden near his home village in Austria 1989.  A very vigorous plant, similar to G. 'Karmina' but with a fuller colour.
'Rosalyn' Accepted name G. pratense "The Plantsman", vol. 4 part 3 p174 Shown in the Plant Finder, 1999, as offered by West Acre Gardens.  Described as having "..pale blue, semi-double flowers" in "New Plantsman".
'Rosanne' Rejected name G. 'Buxton's Variety' x G. himalayense Misspelt: See G. 'Gerwat'.
'Rose' Accepted name G. phaeum GGN, 66, 1997 Distinguished by its wine red-purple flowers, without a light area at the flower centre.  Raised by Mr Ploeger.
'Rose' Rejected name G. endressii Plant entered into RHS Trials, 2004.  Duplicates the use of the name for a G. phaeum cultivar.  Therefore, this use of the name is invalid.  
'Rose Air' Accepted name G. phaeum Mallorn Gardens, UK, 1993? Raised by J. Sirkett, Mallorn Gardens, Cornwall.  Described as "A very pretty small cultivar, with large numbers of small pale reddish purple flowers".
'Rose Clair' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Ingwersen, 1946 Raised by A. T. Johnson 1940.
'Rose Clair' Rejected name G. endressii Ingwersen, 1946 New diagnosis.  See G. x oxonianum 'Rose Clair'
'Rose Foundling' Accepted name G. transversale Pacific Rim Nurseries, USA, 2007 Described as "A unique, deep pink form of normally palid, tuberous species native to Central Asia, Western Siberia and Northern China, with large, asterisk-like leaves, with 7 - 9 linear lobes.  This cultivar descended from a plant found in the Aktash mountains of Uzbekistan".
'Rose Frange' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum A plant in the French national collection.  Published description not found.
'Rose Madder' Accepted name G. phaeum var. phaeum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Garden origin, introduced by the late Trevor Bath, 1986/7.  Name suggested by Mrs Caröe of Vann, Godalming.  Flowers are small for G. phaeum and of a unique colour being a brownish pink, with petals that just touch.  Leaves are prominently blotched.
'Rose Queen' Accepted name G. pratense Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Selected by David. Hibberd, from G. pratense plants circulating under the invalid name of 'Roseum'.
'Rosea' Rejected name G. sanguineum Stormonth Nurseryl, UK, 1928 Feminine form for male species.  See G. 'Roseum'.
'Rosefinch' Accepted name G. psilostemon Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 One of two selections of the species found in meadows in north-east Turkey by Andy Byfield and introduced at the RHS Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 2, without names.  Both were grown on for about 6 years in an Istanbul garden.Both were originally described in the "The Plantsman" 5 (3): p.171-2 (2006).  This is the pink flowered form described as being "..paler than any selection currently in cultivation and has faint greyish shading in place of the black eye; the flowers are about 40mm across."  See also G. 'Snowfinch'.
'Rosemary' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1995 Plant named after the late Mrs Rosemary Lee, the original owner of Coombland Gardens.
'Rosemary Verey' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1998 Discovered in the garden of Penelope Hellyer, "Orchards", Rowfant, Sussex and named after the well known gardener.  Larger than normal flowers coloured bright reddish-pink.
'Rosemoor' Accepted name G. x magnificum Hans Simon Nursery, Germany, 1997 A more compact form of G. x magnificum, growing to some 50cms, raised by Dr Hans Simon in Germany.  Described as follows: "Dense clusters of saucer shaped, heavily veined rich violet flowers and deeply divided, mid-green leaves. This vigorous plant quickly forms hummocks of attractive, deeply divided foliage, that colours well in autumn."
'Rosemore' Rejected name G. x magnificum Misspelt.  S. G. 'Rosemoor'
'Rosenlicht' Accepted name G. x oxonianum (or G. endressii) Staudengartner Klose, Germany, 1991 Garden seedling from Heinz Klose, Germany.  A mound forming plant with light green foliage, bearing mid reddish-purple flowers, from June until first frosts. 40cms tall.
'Rosenmoor' Rejected name G. x magnificum Misspelt:  See G. 'Rosemore'.
'Rosetta' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Syabru'  CPVO, 2005 CPVO grant 22728 made 15/8/2008 to Hans Kramer, NL.   Described as having flowers of "..soft pink, lavender, and white tones..on handsome rosy-pink stems.  The petals are wide, softly rounded, and scored with numerous very thin lavender veins, beginning in the white base of the petal and radiating outwards. The central boss of deep violet to black and the very large, olive-green leaves make the perfect backdrop. 18 inches high (in bloom) and 24 to 30 inches wide."  US Plant Patent 19109 issued 19/8/2008, with notes: "Compared to ‘Buxton Blue’ it differed primarily  in flower color as plants of the cultivar ‘Buxton Blue’ had blue and white-colored flowers, whereas it had pink-colored flowers with light pink-colored centers.” Marketing designation given as G. ROZETTE.
'Roseum' Rejected name G. argenteum Clifton, 1979 Published in RHS Dictionary, 1956.
'Roseum' Accepted name G. sanguineum Yeo, 1985 Originally published by Stormonth, 1928, as 'Rosea' and corrected by Clifton, 1979.  The plant won an Award of Merit at the RHS trials in 1976 under the erroneously applied cultivar name 'Splendens'.
'Roseum' Rejected name G. pratense In breach of article 17.9 of the Cultivated Code:  Latin form created after 1959.   see G. 'Rose Queen'. 
'Roseum' Undetermined name G. phaeum In Sarastro Nursery catalogue 1998, but nothing to indicate that it was originally published before 1959.  
'Roseum' Undetermined name G. dalmaticum Listed on ISU, but nothing to indicate that it was originally published before 1959. 
'Roseum' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum Name found, but nothing to indicate that it was originally published before 1959. 
'Roseum' Undetermined name G. sylvaticum In the Ingwersen Nursery catalogue in 1974, but nothing to indicate that it was originally published before 1959. 
'Roseum' Undetermined name G. x magnificum Listed on ISU, but nothing to indicate that it was originally published before 1959.
'Rosie' Accepted name G. wallichianum Rosies Garden Plants, UK, 2002 A plant bred by Rosies' Garden Plants.  Described as having "Large rich pink flowers, strong plum coloured veins and white centres.  Prominent black anthers.  Trailing marbled foliage.  Ht. 35cms.  Flowers July/October".
'Rosie Crg' Accepted name G. Crg strain (G.x antipodeum) G. lambertii Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1999 A sterile hybrid raised by Crg Farm Plants.  Wide opening pale flowers are rose veined, slightly nodding, over a pewtery -bronze coloured foliage on low growing procumbent stems.
'Rotblut' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 2003 Described as "A small, compact form with light magenta flowers and green calyces.  9" x 20"". 
'Rothbury Candy' Undetermined name G. cinereum group Name used for a new Cyril Foster hybrid given to Catforth Gardens in 1997.  Plant died out at nursery, so they did not proceed with marketing it,  according to Judith Bradshaw.  .
'Rothbury Coquet Island' Rejected name G. cinereum group Name used for a new Cyril Foster hybrid given to Catforth Gardens in 1997.  Plant material died out at nursery, so they did not proceed with marketing under that name. See G. 'Coquet Island'.
ROTHBURY GEM Marketing designation Marketing designation for  G. 'Gerfos'.
'Rothbury Hills' Accepted name G. renardii Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Cyril Foster of Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as "More vigorous than the type, bearing many flowers over a long period.  Bigger flowers than the type, which are lilac-white and heavily veined."
'Rothbury Red' Accepted name G. x antipodeum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2009 Plant raised by Cyril Foster of Hexham, Northumberland.  Being trialled by for Plant Breeder's rights (2002-6) by Blooms.  Robin Moss describes it as having "... reddish-brown foliage with white flowers over low mounds of foliage".  
'Rothbury Red Admiral' Rejected name G. cinereum complex Working name of G. 'Red Admiral' whilst under trial.
'Rothbury Ruby' Accepted name G. phaeum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A Cyril Foster introduction, described as having "Ruby red/purple centres with a dusky bluish surround.  A strong vigorous plant to 45 cms in height".
'Rothbury Sarah' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Cyril Foster of Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as having "..huge flowers coloured very pale to rosy pink."
'Rothbury Skyline' Accepted name G. renardii Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Cyril Foster of Rothbury, Northumberland.  Described as being "..low-growing from, with pale blue flowers."
'Rothbury Star' Accepted name G. soboliferum HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2011 A selection by Cyril Foster from a number of white-eyed seedlings, so differeing from the normal dark red centre in a reddish flower.
'Rozanne' USPP Synonym G. 'Buxton's Variety' x G. himalayense USPP, 2001 Denomination of a plant granted US Plant Patent 12175 on 31/10/2001.  CPVO rights granted in 2000 under the name 'Gerwat', which has priority over 'Rozanne'.  See G. 'Gerwat'.  
ROZANNE  Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Gerwat'.  
'Roze Tinten' Rejected name G. wallichianum de Hessenhof nursery, Holland, 2002/3 A selected seedling from G. wallichianum 'Syabru' and others, which has red flowers. Bred by Hans Kramer of de Hessenhof nursery, Holland.  In breach of Cultivated Code as purely adjectival.  See G. 'Pink Buxton'.
ROZETTE Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Rosetta'
'Rozetter' Rejected name G. wallichianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Purely adjectival so treated as invalid
'Rubin' Undetermined name G. sanguineum In list of new names from H. Klose Nursery, 1994.  Published description not found.
'Rubrum' Accepted name G. x lindavicum Ingwersen, 1946 Raised originally in Germany in the early 20th century, by Franz Sündermann.  Thought in some circles to be the true origin of G. x lindavicum 'Lissadel'. 
'Rubrum' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum Name listed.  Published description not found. 
'Rubrum' Undetermined name G. sessiliflorum A plant in the national collection at East Lambrook Manor, Somerset.  A published description has not been found.   
'Ruby Trinkets' AUS Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense 'Westray' Australian PBR office, 2008 Alan Bremner name for a sport of G. 'Westray' discovered in Holland in a tray of cuttings and being initially marketed in Australia.  Application made for PBR in Australia on 11/9/2008, but withdrawn from application process 9/11/2009.
'Ruprecht' Accepted name G. pratense Catforth Gardens, UK, 1992 Received by Catforth Gardens from Warsaw University BG, via Lancs NCCPG, as the species G. ruprechtii but, in fact, a hybrid.
'Russell Prichard' Accepted name G. x riversleaianum Riverslea Nursery, UK, ca 1908 Raised by Russell Prichard, at Riverslea Nursery, before 1915. Entered by various nurseries into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where its AGM was re-confirmed.
'Russell Pritchard' Rejected name G. x riversleaianum Misspelt: See G. 'Russell Prichard'.
'Russian Blue' Accepted name G. platyanthum Plantsman's Preference, Nursery, UK, 2004/5 Described as having "..glowing purple flowers from April, which are sideways facing rather than nodding and 70 cms tall".
'Russian Giant' Accepted name G. platyanthum Plantsman's Preference nursery, 2005 The plant supplied by Axletree as G. platyanthum giant form.  Sent to RHS Trial.  Fits the description of the plant from Vladivostok in Yeo (p87).
'Sabani Blue' USPP Synonym G. ibericum subsp. jubatum G. libani USPP Office, 2006 Raised by Alan Bremner as a part of his breeding  programme.   US Plant Patent 16305 issued 7/3/2006.  CPVO application made June 2004 under the name G.'Bremigo'. Thus G. 'Bremigo' is the cultivar name due to priority.  See G. 'Bremigo'.
'Saint Ola' Rejected name G. x cantabrigiense Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. 'St Ola'.
'Sally' Undetermined name G. nodosum Name given to a plant found by Nancy Boydell, Aberford, in garden of late Duchess of Westminster and named after her.   Offered by Rarer Plants, according to Plant Finder, 1993.  Published description not found.
'Salome' Accepted name G. lambertii G. procurrens Washfield Nursery, UK, 1985? A garden seedling raised by Elizabeth Strangman, Washfield Nursery, Hawkhurst, Kent, 1981.
'Sambo' Accepted name G. platypetalum Rolf Offenthal, Germany, 1997? Developed by Rolf Offenthal, nurseryman of Grethem, Germany, from a plant purchased as G. x magnificum 'Rosea', which turned out to be a clone of G. platypetalum.  From mass plantings of seed from the plant he selected this seedling. He varies from the normally seen species by having a much larger flower, which is violet blue at the outside, with a large pink inner zone, all with heavy dark veining.  Height 30cms and flower diameter 3.5 cms.
'Samobor' Accepted name G. phaeum var. phaeum Washfield Nursery, UK, 1993 Collected near Samobor, Croatia, in 1990 by Miss Elizabeth Strangman, of Washfield Nursery, Hawkhurst, Kent.
'Sandra' Undetermined name Unknown Rosie's Garden Plants, UK, 2002  'A chance seedling found by Jackie A'violet at her nursery in 1999.  Described as having "..white flowers with faint cherry red veining.  Chocolate brown crinkled foliage.  Mound forming.  Evergreen.  Ht. 30 cms.  Flowering June/Septmeber.  Hardy to -15ºC".  Named after a kindly neighbour, Mrs Sandra Ashdown.
'Sandrine' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. 'Ann Folkard' G. 'Brempat' = PATRICIA CPVO, 2006 A hybrid developed by Thierry Delabroye, France, and named after his wife. CPVO grant 23296 made on 15/10/2008.  The plant is very similar to G. 'Ann Folkard', with early gold coloured foliage turning green later in the season and a sprawling habit.  However, whilst the flowers share a similar colour and appearance, they may be distinguished by their size, as they have roughly a 2 inch (5 cms) diameter, roughly twice the size of the others.  US Plant Patent 19850 issued 24/3/2009 with comments: "Geranium `Sandrine` exhibits yellow immature leaves that change to yellow-green and then to green when mature. 2. Geranium `Sandrine` exhibits a creeping habit. 3. Geranium `Sandrine` exhibits purple flowers with a black center. The closest comparison varieties are the parent plants. The new cultivar `Sandrine` is distinguishable from the female parent Geranium `Ann Folkard` in having larger flowers. The new cultivar `Sandrine` is distinguishable from the male parent Geranium `Patricia` in having yellow immature leaves and a creeping habit. The immature leaves of `Patricia` are green.”
'Sandwijck' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum "Dendroflora", No. 31, 1994, G. Fortgens Collected by University of Utrecht in Italy in the late 1980's and named by them.  Green calyx and flowering stems.  Flowers are pink (RHS CC 78C), slightly darker than 'Ingwersen's Variety'.
'Sanne' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Found by Marc Vanholst, in Belgium, and named after his daughter.  Described as being "Carpet-forming with small brown leaves, fading to orange.  Flowers are white, 1.5 cms in diameter. Flowering May - September.  Height to 25 cms."
'Sara' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Shown in Plant Finder, 1999 as offered by Henley's Lodge Plants, Anglesey. Published description not found.  Said to be "A spreading variety with larger leaves and flowers than the type. Flowers are deep red-purple and develop over a long period in summer."
'Sarah Bartlett' Accepted name G. himalayense ?? Geranium Register, Release 2 A seedling discovered by Gary Bartlett of Sittingbourne, Kent.  He says that the plant "has flowers and leaves of a similar size to G. himalayense.  However, the flower colour is a very pale pink, becoming slightly darker towards the centre, with darker veining.  It differs from 'Derrick Cooke' as it has a smaller flower which is pink, not white."  The plant is named after Mr Bartlett's wife.
'Sarah Cornish' Undetermined name G. renardii HGG Newsletter, autumn 2012 from Beeches Nursery, but no description found
'Sarah Louisa' Undetermined name G. renardii Published description not found.  Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plant Finder, 2002.
'Sateene' CPVO, USPP, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group CPVO, 2004 A chance seedling found in the nursery of Carl Lowe in Newport, Shropshire, England, in 1999. CPVO  licence 17597 granted to Carl Lowe on 22/05/2006. US Plant Patent issued 6/2/2007 number PP17401.  According to USPP application the plant can be compared to G. 'Carol' from which it differs "by not having purple flowers but red-purple flowers with dark purple venation (fully opened upper surfaces are RHS N74B, with venation between N79C and 186D) and a long flowering period."  Application for Canadian PBR made 26/4/2005 but withdrawn 30 December, 2011.
'Saturn' Accepted name G. phaeum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2000 Collected by Will McLewin in NE Croatia as WM9313. Very close in description to G. 'Samobor', though collected from a site several hundred miles away from that collection.
'Saucy Charlie' Accepted name G. nodosum HGG newsletter, Spring 2003 A seedling found in the garden of Penelope Hellyer's nursery in Sussex.  Described as having "..flowers with notched pertals, slightly reflexed and separated, 3cms in diameter.  They are coloured RHS Violet 87A, with paler edges, veining of RHS red-purple 72A and a white centre; reverse of petals RHS 76A.  Stamens are RHS violet-blue 91C.  The plant has an upright habit, with stems varying from 18" to 24", depending on location".
'Scapa Flow' Accepted name G. renardii G. ibericum subsp. jubatum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2004 A hybrid developed by Alan Bremner and marketed via Cally Gardens, Gatehouse of Fleet, Scotland.  Described as having ".. Lots of soft blue flowers with violet veining, which open out flat.  Greyish, textured leaves from G. renardii.  15 inches tall."
'Scarlet Beauty' Undetermined name G. endressii Name listed.  Published description not found.
'Scheherezade' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' Catforth Gardens, UK, 1996? Raised by Alan Bremner. Large lilac pink flowers from June until early August and grows to 60cms.
'Sea Fire' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G. x oxonianum Ingwersen, 1946 Raised by Alan Bremner. Purplish red flowers, over brown green leaves.
'Sea Pink' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G.x oxonianum Charter House Nursery, UK, 1991 Raised by Alan Bremner. Small pink flowers over green leaves.
'Sea Spray' Accepted name G. x antipodeum Cally Gardens, UK, 1991 Raised by Alan Bremner.  Vigorous plants which can spread to 1.2 metres.  A low mound of brown green leaves, covered in pale pink, almost white flowers from June until September.  Fertile.
'Sea Waves' Undetermined name G. x antipodeum (G. traversii var. elegans x G. 'Nigricans') Plant in French National Collection:  Dr Evrard pers comm.  Published description not found.
'Seaspray' Rejected name G. traversii "Plant Finder", 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name: See G. 'Sea Spray'
'Selekt' Rejected name A working name for G. 'Blue Sunrise' used by some Dutch growers before the plant was given a cultivar name.
'Sellindge Blue' Accepted name G. pratense G. saxatile "Perrenials", v1, Phillips & Rix, 1991, p117 Found in the garden of Mr. Martin Rix, at Sellindge, Kent.  Large, mid-blue flowers, with faint veining on a horizontal axis.
'Sricourt' Accepted name G. phaeum "The Plantsman", vol. 6 (3), p161, 2007 Found in the French village of the same name by Bob Brown of Cotswold Garden Flowers.  It has even golden leaves that (unfortunately) burn in strong sun and very dark red, outward facing flowers.  It is neat and compact and was probably the best of the golden-leaved plants gronw in stage 3 of the RHS Trials.
'Shadow Pink' Undetermined name Name listed.  Published description not found.
'Shameface' Undetermined name G. maculatum "Hardy Geraniums", Hibberd, 2003 This may be an American common name for the species and, if so, is invalid under para 19.23 of the Cultivated Code.  To be clarified.
'Sheila Hannay' Rejected name G. harveyi x G. robustum 'Spencer Hannay' Hannays of Bath Nursery, UK, 1999 Misspelt:  See G. 'Sheilah Hannay'.
'Sheilah Hannay' Accepted name G. harveyi G. robustum 'Spencer Hannay' Hannays of Bath Nursery, UK, 1999 Said to "..make a dense silvery mound with masses of pink flowers intermediate between the species.  Needs a well drained position and appears to be difficult to propagate." (Christian name corrected from previous version, by adding "h".)
'Shepherd's Warning' Accepted name G. sanguineum RHS Journal, 103, 1978, p71 Raised by Mr Jack Drake, Inshriarch Nursery, Aviemore, 1975, from open pollinated seed.  Entered by Howard's nurseries into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trials, 2004-6, where its AGM was re-confirmed.  Described as "Low, spreading plant with semi-evergreen, mid-green 137A foliage: height 12cm, spread 33cm. Flowering from 5 May to 15 July and then sporadically from August to early October. Flowers are 3cm in diameter; vivid purplish-pink 67C with base of veins becoming white."
'Sherwood' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1991 A garden seedling raised by D. Hibberd.  Described as having "..star-like flowers, with petals white at the base, developing into bright pink at their tips."
'Shirley Blue' Accepted name G. wallichianum RHS Proceedings, 1890 In RHS Proceedings vol. XII (1890), page cxxiv: A seedling raised by Rev. Wilks, President RHS, pre 1890. Said to have "..flowers of a pale Nemophila blue with a white eye". A garden seedling.
'Shocking Blue' Accepted name G. wallichianum Sugar Creek Gardens, USA, 2007 Described as an improved form G. 'Buxton's Blue' with large blue flowers, with a white eye and dark veins. However, photos show what appears to be an absolutely typical G. wlassovianum with pale blue flowers with a white eye.
'Shooting Star' Accepted name G. sanguineum 'Shepherd's Warning' G. sanguineum 'Elsbeth' "Garten Praxis", 4/1999 p 26 Developed by Rolf Offenthal, nurseryman of Grethem, Germany with the aim of producing a new G. sanguineum cultivar that was not too brightly coloured.  This plant has the habit of G. 'Shepherd's Warning', but is more vigorous.  The flower colour is a pink form of magenta.
'Shouting Star' Rejected name G. x oxonianum x G. psilostemon Invalid due to possibility of confusion with G. 'Shooting Star'.  Re-named G. 'Kanahitobanawa'.
'Show Time' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense Croftway Nursery, UK, 1994 This cultivar is described as having "masses of small mauve pink flowers with a neat mound forming habit". 
'Showtime' Rejected name G. x cantabrigiense (x G. macrorrhizum?) Misspelt: See G. 'Show Time'.
'Signal' Accepted name G. cinereum group Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 1999 Raised by Eugen Schleipfer, Augsburg, Germany. Also in ISU list.  It was entered into the RHS 2006 Rock Garden Trials where, although it did not win an award, it was noted as having attractive qualities and particularly for its vivid colour.
'Silva' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Ernst Pagels Nursery, Germany, 1980. A form of the species collected from the wild.
'Silver Buttons' Accepted name G. maculatum Desirable Plants nursery, UK, 2008 Of unknown origin.  Described as "..essentially a white maculatum with fringed petals".
'Silver Cloak' Accepted name G. incanum G. robustum Rambling Robin Group Plant World seeds, 2004 The description says that "The flowing carpets bear flowers from pink to mauve, with gorgeous leaf forms, all deeply cut, from green to grey to silver, and amazingly yellow and golden leaved forms". 
'Silver Edge' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Catforth Gardens, UK, 199? Plant raised by Robin Moss and given to Catforth Gardens.  No published description found.
'Silver Fox' Undetermined name G. phaeum Published description not found.  Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plant Finder, 2002.
'Silver Jubilee' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Wrong parentage.  See G. sangineum 'Silver Jubilee'.
'Silver Jubilee' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Published description not found.  A hybrid given to Crûg Nursery to introduce by RHS Wisley. It is said that "The Only known parent is G. sanguineum. The result is a strongly sanguineum looking plant, with all parts larger. sun or shade any good soil".
'Silver Pink' Accepted name G. argenteum G. traversii var. elegans Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Raised by Alan Bremner.  Included in Yeo "Hardy Geraniums - new edition" under hybrids.
'Silver Queen' Accepted name G. pratense Clifton, 1979 Raised by  A. T. Johnson  in 1926.  Previously published as var. Silver Queen, by Ingwersen, 1946.
'Silver Shadow' Undetermined name Rambling Robin Group? No published description found.
'Silver Skies' Undetermined name G. pratense A plant obtained by Dutch collector: Dr Geert Lambrecht pers comm.  Published desciption not found.
'Silverwood' Accepted name G. nodosum Birchwood catalogue, 2003 Introduced by Joan Taylor on behalf of the Motor Neurone Disease Association in memory of her late husband.  Described as "..forms a slowly spreading clump  20-30cms in height with light green foliage, glossy when young.  The erect, funnel shaped flowers are white, 2.5-3.0cms in diameter, with notched petals and silvery grey veins.  The anthers are white and the style light green.  The petals show the palest hint of pink when they first appear as buds.  Flowering continues throughout the summer in part of total shade.  Comes reasonably true from seed if isolated from other colour forms, rogue plants having red pigmentation at base and showing more vigorous growth."
'Simon' Accepted name G. nodosum Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 A plant raised by Hans Simon in Germany and marketed in the early 1990's.  Described as having "..with pink flowers".
'Simonside' Accepted name G. pratense var. stewartianum G. 'Maitre Hugo' HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2011 A chance seedling from Cyril Foster.  Described as "very, very floriferous, of medium height (no more than 50cms) with very blue/purple starry flowers with red veins".
'Sinclaire' Accepted name G. incanum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Named for Sinclaire McCredie Parer by Robin Parer, proprietor of the Geraniaceae Nursery, California, USA. This cultivar forms a large billowing mound with finely divided green leaves with slight grey tinge, with large pale pink flowers.  15 x 24 "
'Sirac' Rejected name G. gracile x G. ibericum Misspelt: See G.'Sirak'.
'Sirak' Accepted name G. gracile G. ibericum "Geranium", Hans Frei, 1993 Raised by Hans Simon, Marktheidenfeld, Germany ca 1992. An identical plant was raised by Alan Bremner and circulated, via Axletree Nursery and Catforth Gardens, under the same name.The original plant given an award by the ISU in 1998 with the following description: "The plants are 50 cm high, broad upright, the foliage is large, covers the ground good; in the autumn it changes in the yellow color; the flowers are sterile, 5 cm in diameter, bright purple, the veins are darker, the flowering time is from July to October." Entered by Cambridge University Botanic Garden and Andrew Norton, both National Collection Holders,  into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 1, 2002-4, where it was awarded an AGM.
'Slate Blue' Accepted name G. x monacense Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1994 Raised by Michael Pitkin, Viburnum Gardens, Sydney, Australia.
'Slatina' Undetermined name G. phaeum A plant collected by Angelina Petrisevac in Croatia.  Described as having "dark aubergine-red flowers, with smaller leaves than G. 'Angelina".  Published description not found.
'Small Grey' Accepted name G. phaeum Hillside Cottage Plants, UK, 1997 In the previous version of this Register this was treated as "Invalid", due to it being in breach of article 17.11 of then Cultivated Code, as it consisted soley of adjectival words.  This rule has now been removed, so the name becomes valid under the original publication.
'Smalvlek' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling found in the garden of Rein ten Klooster and named by him.  Described as being "A compact plant with a height of only 30cms.  The narrow petalsw form a bright reddish-pink flower.  There are brown marks on the slightly shiny leaves.  Flowering May - August."
'Smoky Mountain' Accepted name G. maculatum Plantsman's Preference, Nursery, UK, 2004/5 Cultivar name given to the purple flowered form of G. maculatum that was marketed for some years by Axletree Nursery, to distinguish it from the pinker flowered forms now in cultivation.  Named after the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina, USA. one of the homes of the species.
'Snowflakes' Undetermined name G. pratense       Found a few years ago in a Gloucestershire garden by the National Collection Holder, Mrs Jean Purkiss and described as being "..short for a G. pratense, with white flowers. Flowered later than normal. Origina unknown and no description available. There are seeds being offered in the market under this name, which may be the source of this "cultivar". It may also be that it is merely the forma albiflorum given a cultivar name.
'Snow Sprite' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Plant World seeds, 2004 A selection made by the Plant World nursery.  Described as being "This superb miniature, has milky white flowers with all other parts being palest lime green".
'Snow White' Accepted name G. versicolor Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 New cultivar name applied to the white form of G. versicolor, correcting the duplicated cultivar name originally used 'White Lady'. 
'Snowfinch' Accepted name G. psilostemon Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 One of two selections of the species found in meadows in north-east Turkey by Andy Byfield and introduced at the RHS Hardy Geranium Trials, Stage 2, without names.  Both were originally described in the "The Plantsman" 5 (3): p.171-2 (2006).  Both were grown on for about 6 years in an Istanbul garden.  This is the pure white-flowered form which was said ".. in the Turkish garden, performed well, growing vigorously and repeat flowering, as well as self-sowing."  In the RHS Trial it "..formed a large plant, relatively late blooming with pure white flowers, lacking either a dark eye or veins, to about 45 mm across."  See also G. 'Rosefinch'.
'Snowstar' Accepted name G. saxatile HGG Newsletter, Spring 2015 The name given by Robin Moss to the plant collected by Vojtech Holubec as HOL00144 in Kirgistan under the name G. saxatile var. candidum.  A form of the species with large white flowers, with separate petals, with feint veining.
'Solitaire' Accepted name G. libani G.peloponnesiacum  HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2005 A hybrid developed by Alan Bremner, marketed through R & D Plants in Devon and entered into Stage 2 of the RHS Trials.  Described as having "..few flowers, held well above the foliage, 30mm in diameter and coloured violet (RHSCC 88C), with slightly darker violet (RHSCC 88B) veins, held on upright, bronzed (RHSCC 177A) stems, with dull red nodes and short pubescence.  The foliage is particularly attractive, with yellowish green leaves, somewhat glossy and bullate, with sparse, short, patent hairs.  They are 5 to 7 times divides and lobed to about one third, the lobes being rounded with short, acute tips and few, irregular teeth".  
'Somerset Huish' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Clifton, 1979 Published in Clifton, 1979.  Published description not found.
'Something Special' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 A plant raised by Jos Vandeweijer in belgium, with very dark, blotched foliage and veined, intensely redd flowers.
'Sonata' Accepted name G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' G. versicolor Catforth Gardens, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner.  White flowers over brown green leaves.
'Sonya' Accepted name G. cinereum group Rainforest Gardens, Canada, 1998 Mutation from G. 'Lawrence Flatman' arising at the Rainforest Gardens Nursery, BC, Canada.
'Sophie' USPP,CPVO, CAN Accepted name G. cinereum group USPP, 2011 US Plant Patent no. 21689 issued 1/2/2011, with following notes: "The following traits have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be the unique characteristics of `Sophie`: 1. Upright and outwardly spreading plant habit. 2. Strong growth habit. 3. Freely basal branching habit. 4. Freely flowering habit. 5. Light purple-colored flowers. 6. Good garden performance. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the parent selections primarily in flower color. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of the Geranium cinereum `Heather`, not patented. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Holsworthy, Devon, United Kingdom, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Heather` in flower color as plants of `Heather` had lighter-colored flowers. In addition, plants of the new Geranium were more vigorous and stronger than plants of `Heather`.  CPVO grant 30477 made on 15/8/2011.  Application made for Canadian rights in 2010, but withdrawn in 2014.
'South Nutfield' Accepted name G. sanguineum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1997 Raised from a garden seedling by Mrs Hansford and named after the village where it was found.
'Southcombe Beauty' Accepted name G. sylvaticum Spinners Nursery, UK, 199? A plant given to Peter Chappell and introduced by Spinners Nursery.
'Southcombe Double' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Southcombe Gardens, UK, 1982 A garden seedling raised at Southcombe  Garden Plant Nursery, Devon.  Described as having "Small, bright pink, double flowers, with narrow petals."
'Southcombe Star' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Southcombe Gardens, UK, 1983 A garden seedling raised at Southcombe  Garden Plant Nursery, Devon.  Described as having "Small, star-like flowers, with oval petals of a pinky-blue colour."
'Southease Celestial' Accepted name G. pratense Marchant's Hardy Plants, 2005 A plant that arose in the garden of Mr Adrian Orchard of Southease Plants, East Sussex.  Described as having "Wonderful huge cupped salvers of luminescent lavender-blue, up to 2.25 inches in diameter, in June and again August/September.  60cms tall".
'Souvenir de Ren Mac' CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum group CPVO, 1996 CPVO rights grant 5524 issued 31 December, 1999, but withdrawn on 15/9/2008.
'Spencer Hannay' Accepted name G. robustum Hannays of Bath Nursery, UK, 1996 Collected originally in Lesotho as S&SH14 the proprietor of Hannay's of Bath and named after him.  Replaces invalid name G. 'Hannay's Form'.
'Spessart' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Gärtnerei Simon, Germany, 1957. A seedling from a plant that Hans Simon got from Sundermann's nursery in 1955 - see RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp342.
'Spindrift' Accepted name G. x antipodeum (G. traversii x G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans') G. swatense Axletree Nursery, UK, 1995 Raised by Alan Bremner.  Described as "A low, widely-spreading plant producing a carpet of marbled leaves, with purplish-pink veined flowers from May to October."
'Spinners' Accepted name G. pratense ?? Axletree Nursery, UK, 1990 Raised by Peter Chappell of Spinners Nursery, from seed collected by Marvin Black in the USA.  Described as "A magnificent cranesbill growing to 3 feet high and wide, with deeply cut leaves resembling G. pratense.  Flowers deep purple-blue, bowl-shaped and upturned, in profusion."
'Spiti Valley' Accepted name G. himalayense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Plant collected by Alistair McKelvie in the Spiti Valley, Pakistan. Described as having "Bright blue flowers, with pink veins and a white centre. To a height of 30cms."
'Splendens' Undetermined name G. sanguineum var. striatum Clifton, 1979 An old cultivar of G. s. var. striatum, which won an Award of Merit at the RHS trials in 1976. Entered by Rosies Garden Plants into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium, Stage 2 Trials, 2003-5 where it was awarded an AGM.  Described as  "Spreading, rhizomatous perennial, 25 x 60cm in trial. Rosette leaves few, soon disappearing. Stem leaves paired, c55   65mm, dark green (147A) sparsely covered with short, adpressed hairs, longer but confined to the veins on the underside, divided almost to the base into 7; divisions with 1 or 2 lobes or lobeless, clearly distinct, cuneate, widest near the apex, revolute, rounded at the apex with a minute, acute tip; lobes lanceolate, sometimes suppressed, lacking teeth, rounded with a minute, acute tip. Stems prostrate with a light covering of medium length, patent hairs, green flushed red (183C) on the exposed side. Flowers borne singly or in pairs on a peduncle toc80mm; pedicels to 40mm. Sepals  elliptic, 7 x 4mm with long white hairs along the veins; mucro to 1.5mm. Flowers to 35mm across, white, secondary veins flushed pink (62B/C), fine primary veins pinkish purple (64C); petals broad obovate, to 16 x 15mm, with a shallow notch at the apex."
'Splendens' Accepted name G. subcaulescens Clifton, 1979 & Arends, 194? According to Clifton, 1979, introduced from the wild by J. Stormonth, 1936 and re-introduced 1974 by Stanton nursery. However, in the book "Mein leben als Gärtner und Züchter", Arends describes raising the cultivar himself and marketing it in 1930: The original nursery records were lost when the nursery was bombed during the second world war.  Entered by Andrew Norton, the National Collection Holder and Arends/Maubach into RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Rock Garden Trial, 2004-6, where its AGM was re-confirmed.  Described as "Low growing plant with semi-evergreen, mid-green 137B foliage: height 17cm, spread 20cm. Flowering from 10 May to 15 July. Flowers are 3cm in diameter; bright pink 67B, finely veined red 60A with veins uniting at base to give a dark red 59A eye; style and anthers black." 
'Spotted in the Pass' Accepted name G. reflexum 'Katara Pass' ?? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2013 A seedling of discovered by Robin Moss.    Described as being "..similar in flower colour and reflex to 'Jackie' above (i.e. larger, far more intense purple flowers than 'Katara Pass') but with heavily spotted foliage".  Named after the owner of the garden in Northumberland where Cyril Foster, the Geranium hybridist, works and found in that garden.
'Spring Fling' CPVO Accepted name G. x oxonianum CPVO, 2000 Said to be the first variegated G. x oxonianum, it is described as having "yellow leaves with green centres and pink flowers".  Replaced earlier working names 'Kurt's Variegated' and 'Jester'. CPVO plant breeders rights issued under grant number 10486 on 24th February, 2003.  Rights Grant terminated 15/4/2006.
'Spring Purple' Accepted name G. maculatum Vaste Planten, Holland, 2002 A plant given to Dutch nurseryman Coen Jansen, by another Dutch nurseryman, Piet Oudolf.  Described as "..conspicuous in early Spring by its dark red-purplish young leaves.  The flowers are darkish red-lilac.  35 cms tall."
'Springtime' CPVO, USPP, CAN Accepted name G. phaeum CPVO, 2002 A chance seedling found by nurseryman Piet Oudolf in Holland.  CPVO rights issued under number 10072 on 23rd September, 2002 and US plant Patent PP13785 issued 6th May, 2003.  Canadian PBR licence 1812 granted 26th May, 2004.  According to USPP application "Young foliage upper surface: Centre RHS149C/D, towards margins 137A, with random dark red 183A to 183B midway.  Upper petals surface slightly more red than 187A/B."
'St. Ola' Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense (G. d. 'Album' x G. m. 'Album') Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Raised by Alan Bremner. Named after his home town in Orkney.  A plant similar to G. 'Biokovo', but varying by having whiter flowers, rarely showing any pink, with broader petals and flatter, deeper green leaves.
'Stade's Hellrosa' Accepted name G. dalmaticum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "A slow growing plant to about 15 cms, with dark pink flowers."
'Standhoe' Rejected name Bath & Jones, 1994 Misspelt: See G. 'Stanhoe'
'Stanhoe' Accepted name G. x antipodeum GGN,  28, 1988 Seedling from the garden of Ken Beckett, at Stanhoe, near Kings Lynn in Norfolk,  1979.
'Stanton Mill' Accepted name G. pratense Bideawee Cottage Nursery, UK, 2007  A seedling found in a local mill race by Mark Robson of the Bide-a-wee Cottage Nursery, Northumberland, UK.  Described as having "..pink flowers with the petals strongly veined and much more compact than the normal plant.  24 inches."
'Star Struck' Accepted name Darwin Plants, Holland, 2005 Described as "..a versatile trailing plant.  Small pink flowers with dark pink veins.  Many flowers.  Dark coffee brown leaves."
'Starlight' Accepted name G. asphodeloides subsp. asphodeloides G. asphodeloides subsp. crenophilum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1990 One of a number of garden seedlings found at Cambridge Botanic Garden in 1980 from a mix of pink and white flowered subsp. asphodeloides plants (See "Hardy Geraniums" pp 44 & 130).  Subsequently named by David Hibberd of Axletree Nursery.  
'Starman' Accepted name G. soboliferum "Garten Praxis", 12/1999 p 14 Developed by Rolf Offenthal, nurseryman of Grethem, Germany from mass cross fertilisation of G. soboliferum clones, to produce a single chosen seedling.  'Starman' has flowers with very clear and strong colours, highlighted by the unique two tone petals.  It is particularly compact for its species, with upright flower stems.  The flowering period extends from the middle of July to the end of September, longer than the normal species.  Height 40-50cms. Flower diameter 4.5 cms and  colour dark pink with crimson magenta marks.
'Stars & Stripes' Rejected name G. sylvaticum An invalid name (use of the "&") that has been used in Finland, but no published description found.
'Steele Perkins clone' Rejected name G. x cantabrigiense Invalid due to use of the word "clone".  Published description not found.  Pers comm from Tony Lord, Plant Finder, 2002.  No replacement name assigned.
'Stephanie' Accepted name G.peloponnesiacum G. renardii Catforth Gardens, UK, 1997 An accidental seedling found at RBG Edinburgh, where it was grown as G. peloponnesiacum.
'Stillingfleet'  Rejected name G. x oxonianum Charter House Nursery, UK, 1997? Invalid.  Plant originally incorrectly circulated under this name but without owner's consent.  See G. 'Stillingfleet Keira'.
'Stillingfleet Ghost' Accepted name G. phaeum Stillingfleet Nursey, UK, 1995 Nursery seedling introduced by Vanessa Cook of Stillingfleet Nursery in about 1986.
'Stillingfleet Keira' Accepted name G. x oxonianum "New & Unusual Plants", Vol.6 No. 4 A cultivar from Stillingfleet nurseries.  Originally incorrectly circulated as G. 'Stillingfleet', but without the owner's consent.  A normal x oxonianum with pale to mid-pink flowers.
'Stixwould Lilac' Accepted name G. clarkei ?? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2004 A seedling found in the garden of Andrew Sankey of Stixwould, Lincolnshire.  Described by him as having "kashmir type leaves varying in size from 90mm to 140mm on a plant reaching 320mm in height - mid-green in colour.  Flowers in Spring (at same time as other Kashmir varieties).  Flowers lilac (not blue, not purple) and 30mm in diameter".
'Storm Chaser' Accepted name G. traversii x G. procurrens G. lambertii  RHS Garden Store, 2007 A hybrid developed by Alan Bremner.  Described as having "masses of lilac-pink flowers with a dark magenta-veined eye. 30cms".
'Strangman' Undetermined name Name listed.  Published description not found.
'Strawberry Frost' Accepted name G. traversii ?? Plantsman's Preference, Nursery, UK, 1999/00  Raised by Phillipa Brown, the proprietor of a nursery in Herefordshire.  A very hardy G. traversii hybrid, with coral pink flowers, flowering June to November
'Striatum' Accepted name G. pratense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 This name was originally based on G. pratense var. striatum, but this may not have been validly published, as no author nor date of publication is known for the epithet.  What is more, G. pratense flore-variegato (G. Don 1831) does have a description and, thus, probably has priority.  Also, G. pratense 'Striatum Akaton' shares colour characteristics with the plant. As a result, in view of the long use of the name 'Striatum', including its publication in both versions of Peter Yeo's well-known books on the subject, it is proposed that the term be conserved for those cultivars with smaller flowers, separating them from the larger flowered 'Striatum Akaton'.
'Striatum Akaton' Accepted name G. pratense Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "similar to G. pratense 'Striatum', but with larger flowers, which are white with violet-blue spots and stripes."
'Sue Cox' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 A selection made in 1986 from the garden of Sue Cox in Oxfordshire.  Small semi-double flowers, with narrow, pointed petals, coloured a vivid pink, white at the base.
'Sue Crg' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. 'Salome' Crg Farm Plants, UK, 1993 Raised by Bleddyn Wynn-Jones, the proprietor of Crg Farm Plants and named after his wife.  Described as having "a spreading, loosely mounding habit.  Flowers are a reddish-purple with a dark centre.  The petals are separated and have a pale central stripe and dark veins."
'Sue's Sister' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. 'Salome' Crg Farm Plants, UK, 2000 A sister seedling from the same batch as G. 'Sue Crg'.  Described as being of "similar habit although decidedly less vigorous, with the foliage resembling G. x oxonianum but yellowish on emerging.The background flower colour is pale shell pink, overlaid with red, velvetyfeathery veins, converging into a dark eye." 
'Sugar Babe' Accepted name G. cinereum group "New & Unusual Plants", v4:1, 1998 Bred by Carl & Janette Lowe of Border Alpines.  Described as having "..large soft pink-red flowers with red veins, more compact than 'Heather'."   Launched in 2000 by Pride of Place Plants, Canada.  UK PBR grant number 6757 made 1/5/1998, but subsequently withdrawn.
'Sugar Pink' Undetermined name G. traversii Name included in Plant Finder, 1993.  Published description not found.
'Sugar Plum' Accepted name G. incanum var. incanum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 A plant named by Monique Simone, Weidners Nursery, Encinitas, California.  Said to have ruby coloured flowers.
'Suleiken' Accepted name G. sanguineum Gärtnerei Simon, Germany, 2000 Introduced by Dr Hans Simon from the wild, this cultivar is described as "salmon pink flowers with bluish anthers, with leaves that colour well in the Autumn".
'Sumela' Accepted name G. psilostemon "The Plantsman", NS V7 (1): p.65, 2008 A new cultivar said to have been originally propagated from wild material.  This is a more compact plant than other cultivars, being some 65-70 cms tall.  Flowers of a similar colour to other cultivars, with well marked veining, but the petals are broader giving a somewhat ruffled appearance.
'Summer Cloud' Accepted name G. collinum G. clarkei 'Kashmir White' Axletree Nursery, UK, 1998 A chance seedling from Cambridge University Botanic Garden.  Described as "Sprawling stems up to 1.2m long bear flowers with a strongly veined white petals, similar to but sjaller than those of G. clarkei 'Kashmir White'. 
SUMMER SKIES Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Gernic'
'Summer Skies' USPP Synonym G. pratense x G. himalayense 'Plenum'? USPP,  1998 The correct name of this cultivar is G. 'Gernic', which was given as part of the CPVO grant of Plant Breeders Rights 2775 granted 17/8/1998.  This name is a synonym raised by the US Plant Patent Office when they later issued their Patent. See G. 'Gernic'.
'Summer Sky' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum Plant World Seeds, UK, 2002 Described as "Masses of smallish pinkish-mauve flowers on countless dividing stems from spring until late autumn.  Height 18-24 inches".
'Summer Snow' Accepted name G. pyrenaicum Plant World Seeds, UK, 2002 Described as "This pure white form produces profuse quantities of white flowers with deeply notched petals.  12-24 inches".
'Summer Surprise' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Oudolf Nursery, Holland, 1992/3 Raised by Piet Oudolf, Netherlands. Bright pink flowers, with a white eye.
'Sndermann's Purpur' Undetermined name G. cinereum group Name found in listing and also in Rolf Offenthal's catalogue, 1996/7.  Published description not found.
'Superbum' Undetermined name G. sanguineum var alpinum On list of field trials from Chicago BG, who received it from Lamb Nurseries, Long Beach.  Published description not found.
'Superstar' Accepted name G. x oxonianum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2016 A plant found in America in a TV stars garden and sent to Coen Jansen in Holland for marketing. Described as being "A white-flowered form of the hybrid, with dark markings and pots on the leaves". 
'Susan' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Penlan Perennials Nursery, UK, 2007 Raised by John Tuite of West Acre Gardens and named after Sue Tuite, his wife.  Described as follows "forms a low-growing, compact mound of bright green foliage.  Flowers are white, netted and veined with dark lilac markings, similar to G. versicolor."
'Susie White' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Chollerford Gardens, UK, 1997 Found by Robin Moss in herb garden at Chollerford, Northumberland run by Susie White. Flowers very pale pink to white.
'Suzy White' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Plant in French National Collection:  Dr Evrard pers comm.  Invalid form of G. 'Susie White'
'Svelte Lilac' Accepted name G. nodosum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1990 The cultivar name given by Joe Sharman of Monksilver Nursery, Cambridgeshire to the lilac coloured form common in cultivation.
'Swansdown' Accepted name G. lambertii Clifton, 1979 A cultivar name given by Richard Clifton to the white flowered, red centred  form of the wild species.
'Sweet Heidi' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. wallichianum ?? Sugar Creek Gardens, USA, 2007 Said to be a hybrid of both blue and pink forms of G. wallichianum, as well as other pink flowered species.  It was bred by Marco van Noort, Holland, and is named after his wife.  It is described as having "..a large white eye, which is surrounded by a narrow pink ring, the remainder of the petals being of a blue purple." CPVO licence granted 2008 under licence number 22915. US Plant Patent 19533 issued 2/12/2008, with comments: "1. `Sweet Heidy` exhibits flowers that are tri-color with purple veins; pale violet centers become purple pink in the middle regions and violet-blue near the margin. 2. `Sweet Heidy` is long blooming; flowers from May until frost. 3. `Sweet Heidy` produces an abundance of flowers continuously through the bloom season. 4. `Sweet Heidy` has clean green foliage with yellow spots (enlarged vein areas). 5. `Sweet Heidy` has a prostrate growth habit. 6. `Sweet Heidy` is propagated with ease by division or tissue culture. 7. `Sweet Heidy` is cold hardy at least to U.S.D.A.9 Zone 5.Sweet Heidy`, can be compared to `Buxton's Variety`  and `Pink Penny`, both similar in having a long blooming habit. `Buxton's Variety` differs in particular in having blue flowers while `Pink Penny` exhibits pink flowers.”
'Sweetwater' Accepted name G. maculatum Geraniaceae Nusery, USA, 1999 A selection made by Sweetwater Nursery, Richmond, CA.  Shiny green leaves, with violet pink flowers with cream centres. 15 x 20 "
'Swish Purple' Accepted name G. nodosum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1990 A cultivar name given by Joe Sharman of Monksilver Nursery in Cambridgeshire to the dark flowered form common in cultivation.
'Syabru' Accepted name G. wallichianum Washfield Nursery, UK 1991 Collected by Mr Edward Needham in Nepal pre 1986 and named after the Sherpa village near where it was found.
'Sydney Wharf' Accepted name G. robustum 'Hannay' G. caffrum? Hannays of Bath Nursery, UK, 1999 A chance seedling found at the Hannay's of Bath nursery.  It makes a tighter mound than G. robustum and has the dense flowering of G. caffrum.
'Sylva' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Misspelt: See G. 'Silva'.
'Sylvia's Surprise' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. wallicianum USPP, 2012 CPVO Grant 27678 made 15/8/2010. US Plant Patent no. 21333 issued on 28/9/2010, with following notes: "The following traits have been repeatedly observed and are determined to be the unique characteristics of `Sylvia's Surprise`: 1. Upright and outwardly spreading plant habit. 2. Vigorous growth habit. 3. Freely and continuous flowering habit. 4. Pink-colored flowers. 5. Long flowering period. 6. Good garden performance. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the parent, `Buxton's Variety`, in flower color as plants of `Buxton's Variety` have light blue-colored flowers. In addition, plants of the new Geranium are more freely flowering than plants of `Buxton's Variety`. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of Geranium `Rozanne`. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Bressingham, United Kingdom, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of `Rozanne` in flower color as plants of `Rozanne` had violet blue-colored flowers with white-colored centers."  
'Symphony' Accepted name G. cinereum group  G. sanguineum? HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1998 A new plant from Jack Drake Nursery which is thought, by them, to include G. sanguineum in its breeding.
'Syrak' Rejected name "Géranium Vivaces", 1997 Misspelt: See G. 'Sirak'
''t Sticht' Accepted name G. pratense 'Mrs Kendall Clarke' Geraniumboekje, 2012 A seedling from the former nursery Ploeger de Bilt, in the Netherlands. The name is short for "het Sticht", meaning diocese in Dutch.  Het or 't is an article in Dutch and "Sticht" is a convent or a district where in the middle ages Abbots or Bishops had secular supervision. Described as having "Soft blue flowers with darker veins.  Flowering June - July.  Height to 70cms."
'Taff's Jester' Accepted name G. phaeum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1989 Garden seedling introduced by the late Mr Stephen Taffler.  Said to have "..leaves that are irregularly streaked and motteld with cream".
'Talish' Accepted name G. macrostylulm Janis Ruksans, Latvia, 2003 Described as "..larger flowering form with purplish-pink flowers with purple veins".  Collected in the Talish mountains, southern Azerbaijan.
'Tanya Rendall' CPVO, USPP Accepted name G. x antipodeum 'Black Ice' G. x oxonianum cv. CPVO, 2005 The seedling arose as part of a planned breeding programme for cultivars suitable for hanging basked and garden use.  CPVO Rights licence 15728 issued to Orkney Perennials 20/6/2005.  US Plant Patent issued 28/8/2007 under PP17950.  USPP application stated that it is very similar to G. 'Luscious Linda', except that it was "a larger plant which had brown, rather than green foliage (Upper surface RHS 166A, towards the margin, 61B; venation 172A).  Upper surface of petals 81B, throat, 155C, with nectar guides, 81B."    Raised by Richard Rendall and named after his daughter
'Tchakor' Rejected name Misspelt: See G. 'Czakor'
'Tcschelda' Accepted name G. renardii Gärtnerei  Simon, Germany, 1993 Collected in the Caucasus by Hans Simon ca. 1980. Described in "The Plantsman", New Series vol. 4, part pp172 as having "Heavily veined flowers with a somewhat pinker ground colour (76A/B) than G. 'Whiteknights'". Accompanied by picture.
'Terre Franche' Accepted name G. 'Philippe Vapelle' G. platypetalum GGN, 66, 1997 Raised by Ivan Louette in Belgium and named after the place where he grew up.  Described as having blue-purple flowers and a long lasting season from June to September. 45 cms tall.  The G. platypetalum used was a collection made by Jan Balis  in the Caucasus and had large, slightly nodding flowers.
'Teschelda Rejected name G. renardii Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Misspelt: See G. 'Tcschelda'.
'The Bride' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register, Release 2 Found by John Hobson of Rock Farm Perennials, Ely, Cambs. In the collection plot at the NCCPG National Collection that was held at Cherry Hinton, Cambridge, when he was Curator.  It is believe to be a seedling of G. x oxonianum 'Kingston' and has pure white flowers.
'The Vision' Rejected name G. sanguineum Misstated cultivar name: See G. 'Vision'
'Thumbling Hearts' USPP, CAN, CPVO Accepted name G. cinereum USPP, 2009 US Plant Patent no 20096 issued on 16/6/2009, to Hubertus Oudtshoorn and Future Plants with following comments: "1. Upright and outwardly spreading plant habit. 2. Strong growth habit. 3. Freely basal branching habit. 4. Dark green-colored leaves. 5. Freely flowering habit. 6. Light pink-colored flowers with red purple-colored venation and centers. 7. Good garden performance. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the female parent, the cultivar ‘Purple Pillow’, primarily in flower color as plants of the cultivar ‘Purple Pillow’ have warm purple-colored flowers. Plants of the new Geranium differ primarily from plants of the male parent, the cultivar ‘Ballerina’, primarily in flower color as plants of the cultivar ‘Ballerina’ have darker pink-colored flowers. Plants of the new Geranium can be compared to plants of the Geranium cinereum cultivar ‘Carol’, disclosed in U.S. Plant Pat. No. 14,124. In side-by-side comparisons conducted in Rijpwetering, The Netherlands, plants of the new Geranium differed primarily from plants of the cultivar ‘Carol’ in flower color as plants of the cultivar ‘Carol’ had purple-colored flowers."  Canadian rights applied for March 2008, but rejected December 2012.  CPVO application made February 2010, but rejected April 2012.
'Thumping Heart' Undetermined name G. cinereum   Robin Moss mentioned in Autumn 2011 HGG newsletter.  Could be 'Thumbling Hearts'.
'Thunder Cloud' USPP, CPVO, CAN, AUS Accepted name G. x antipodeum USPP, 2012 A hybrid of G. traversii 'Nigra' and G. sessiliflorum by Steve Burton, NZ. US Plant Patent 19388 issued 28/10/2008, with comments: "characterized by its white-colored flowers having pink-colored venation, dark purple-colored foliage, and rosette growth habit. Of the many commercially available Geranium cultivars known to the inventor, the most similar in comparison to the new cultivar is `Purple Passion`, U.S. Plant patent application Ser. No. 11/704,787. However, in side by side comparisons, plants of the new cultivar differ from plants of `Purple Passion` in the following characteristics: 1. Plants of the new cultivar have darker and smaller foliage than plants of `Purple Passion`; and 2. Plants of the new cultivar have a flower color different from plants of `Purple Passion`."  CPVO Plant Breeders Rights 32989 granted 18/6/2012, but withdrawn 15/10/2014.  Canadian application for PBR abandoned 8/8/2011.  Australian rights terminated 24/3/2011.
'Thurstonianum' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Yeo, 1985 Originally published as G. endressii var. thurstonianum in the Journal of Botany, pp 44, 1928, Turrill.  NB. A new botanical description has been published for G. x oxonianum forma thurstonianum by M. Grant, RHS Wisley, in 2004.
'Thurstonianum Isherwood' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum Included in Plant Finder, 1997, as offered by Lower Severalls Nursery, Somerset.  Published description not found.
'Tidmarsh' Accepted name G. palustre G. sylvaticum? Washfield Nursery, UK, 1991? Garden seedling found by the late AWA 'Bill' Baker, near Pangbourne, Berks.  Resembles a G. sylvaticum in habit, but flowers later and has reddish-purple flowers.  Leaves intermediate, but not glossy.
'Timurlan Gate' Accepted name G. charlesii Janis Ruksans, Latvia, 2003 A selected form of G. charlesii collected at the Timurlan Gate, Nuratau Mountains, Uzbekistan.  Said to be ".. Very distinct..very floriferous..covered with pinkish purple flowers".
'Tinpenny Mauve' Accepted name NCCPG Gloucs, UK, 2006 A garden seedling found by Elaine Horton of Tinpenny Farm, Gloucestershire, UK.  Described as having "..large mid-blue flowers, with rounded petals which slightly overlap each other." 
'Tiny Monster' Accepted name G. sanguineum 'Ankum's Pride' G. psilostemon "Garten Praxis", 4/1999 p 24 Hybrid raised by Rolf Offenthal, Grethem, Germany. 50cms high, flowers 4-5 cms in diameter, crimson purple red, with dark veins.  Flowering from start of July to end of September.  Good ground cover plant.  See also G. ROLF ROYCE.
'Tod the Whippet' Undetermined name G. x antipodeum A seedling found at Chipchase Garden Nursery, Northumberland by Suzanne Newell, who named it (pers comm Robin Moss).  Published description not found.
'Tom Stone' Rejected name G. phaeum Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. phaeum 'George Stone'
'Tony's Talisman' Accepted name G. nodosum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2010 A chance seedling found at their old nursery garden by Judith Bradbury's husband Tony and named for him, growing near to G. 'Swish Purple' and G. 'Whiteleaf'.  Described as follows: Basal leaves approx. 11cms across, 6.5 cms long are 3-lobed, with serrated edges and distinct veining, of mid-green colour.  Flowers are deep red-purple with rich velvety appearance.  Flowers 2.6 cms across with 5 petals of even colour, 1.8 cms long, wit white base, .75 cms long. Flower funnels at centre, each petal starting with point, widening to 1.1 cms at outer edge where petals turn outward and have wavy edges (v. similar shape to G. 'Whiteleaf'.  Height of plant when flowering 38-45 cms.  Picture in HGG Newsletter Autumn, 2012.
'Toon Lambrecht' Accepted name G. sylvaticum HGG Newsletter, Autumn, 2005 A seedling collected from the wild in Northern Greece on the Varnous mountains, near Pissoderi on the Albanian border by Geert Lambrecht and named after his father.  He say that "It looks like a G. sylvaticum in every respect except in the flower, which is a bright, lipstick pink, with a large white eye". 
'Trevor's Recall' Undetermined name G. 'Rose Madder'?? A plant designated by the Plant Heritage Guardian scheme.  Named for the late Trevor Bath.  Petals that look like velvet and coloured an unusual pink-mauve colour.  Formal description awaited from Jean Purkiss of Express Plants.  
'Trevor's Welcome' Undetermined name         This is the cultivar name for the plant previously allocated the working name Bright Stranger whilst in development. Published description not found.
'Trevor's White' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1997 Found growing in the garden of Trevor Bath and named by him.  Flowers very pale pink to white.
'Trinity' Accepted name G. x antipodeum G. rubifolium Geraniaceae Nursery, USA, 1999 Low mounding plant with dark grey-green leaves with a brown tinge.  Flowers light magenta, slightly notched becoming pale in the centre, separated petals.  10 x 15"
'Turco' Accepted name G. platypetalum Rolf Offenthal, Germany, 1996 Brought to market by Rolf Offenthal who believes that it was originally collected in Eastern Turkey by some German collectors.  It varies from the normally seen species by having a much large violet blue flower with a large white eye.  This is possibly the same plant as G. 'Genyell' - it certainly looks very similar and both were collected in Turkey.  If so, this will be the valid cultivar name and the other will be a synonym.
'Twittens' Rejected name G. robertianum Working name for possible new cultivar, according to Richard Clifton.
'Tyne Mist' Accepted name G. phaeum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as having ".. Lacy flowers coloured lilac-pink to purple.  The absence of a dark eye separates it from G. 'David Bromley'.
'Tyne Salmon' Undetermined name G. x oxonianum     HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2015 A plant raised by Robin Moss. No description given.
'Typ Marcus' Undetermined name G. sanguineum Name listed.  Published description not found.
'Tzakor' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Misspelt: See G. 'Czakor'
'Uln Oag Triag' Accepted name G. macrostylulm Cherry Tree Lodge, UK, 2001 Described as being "A lovely clear pink form with deeper pink veins, several flowers on the tops of erect stems to 35cms".
'Undine' Accepted name G. erianthum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 Cultivar name given to G. erianthum white form.  Probably of wild origin.
'Ushguli Grijs' Accepted name G. ibericum   Birgitte Husted Bendtsen, "Storkenæb", 2003 Introduced by Hans Kramer of the Dutch nursery "Kwerkerij de Hessenhof", having been found by him in the Caucasus.  It is described as having "..steel blue flowers".
'Vaihingen' Undetermined name G. pratense A large flowered form of G. pratense collected by Thomas Schulz in the countryside near Vaihingen, a town near Stutgart, Germany. No details of publication found.
'Vanessa Inman' Accepted name G. pratense 'Rose Queen' HGG Newsletter, Spring 2012 A chance seedling rescued from a border by Kathleen Inman, a member of the Hardy Geranium Group.  Described as being "a semi-double pink form, probably a seedling of G. pratense 'Roseum'.  It has 12-15 petals, five of which are evenly sized and the remainder being randomly sized and replacing the stamen.  The petals have pink veins.  It grows to a height of 75-90cms and is quite vigorous."
'Variegatum' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Clifton, 1979 In cultivation prior to1900.  Possibly of garden origin.
'Variegatum' Undetermined name G. phaeum var. phaeum Yeo, 1985 An old cultivar thought to be of garden origin.    Invalid if not published prior to 1959, but early publication not found.
'Variegatum' Rejected name G. x monacense Incorrect diagnosis.  See G. phaeum var phaeum 'Variegatum'
'Velbit' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Velebit'.
'Velebit' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Gärtnerei Simon, Germany, 1990 Collected by Hans Simon, Velebit Mountains, Croatia.  Petals are mid magenta-pink and the reddish calyx is much less inflated than usual.  The flowers are well-presented on tall stems - see RHS "The Garden", August 1993, pp342.
'Vera May' Accepted name G. sanguineum G. procurrens HGG Newsletter, Spring 2002 Raised by Vera Scott of Lymington, Hants., and introduced by Andrew Norton.  Described as having "..overlapping heart shaped petals slightly notched and crinkled at the apex.  Flowers mauvish pink, with light sheen, distinct dark veins, suffused at base by magenta-purple. 2.5cms diameter.  Leaves similar to G. sanguineum, sterile.  Similar flower to 'Dilys', but plant is more compact and does not produce G. procurrens like runners".
VERGULD SAFFIER Marketing designation Marketing designation for G. 'Blogold'
'Vickie Lynn' Accepted name G. maculatum Internationale Stauden Union registration Raised by Baltensperger/Friedrich, 1995.  Similar to the type, but with very shiny leaves which colour orange-red in the autumn.  Flowers purplish-pink.
'Victor Reiter' Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Hibberd, 2003 This is one of a number of seed strains originally developed by the Californian nurseryman Victor Reiter in the 1970's, the basis of selection being their dark leaves.  This one is described as having "..deeply cut, rich purple spring foliage, fading to purplish-green as the dark blue flowers open in late spring and summer."
'Victor Reiter Junior' Accepted name G. pratense Victor Reiter Group Hibberd, 2003 A very dark leaved, micro propagated selection from G. 'Victor Reiter'.
'Victoria' Accepted name G. reflexum Axletree Nursery, UK, 1994 Collected  by the late Dr Lionel Bacon, ex President of the AGS.
'Violaceum' Undetermined name G. cinereum group In Rolf Offenthal's catalogue, 1996/7.  His letter says that it was introduced before the second world war, probably in Germany.   Published description not found.
'Violaceum Plenum' Rejected name G. pratense Invalid form of cultivar name. See G. pratense 'Plenum Violaceum'
'Vision' Accepted name G. sanguineum Viburnum Gardens, Australia, 1994 A compact form, with a larger flower than normal which is of a more intense cerise colour.  A widely grown  plant in the USA, 
'Vision Lilac' Accepted name G. sanguineum Chiltern seeds young plants, UK, 2004 Described as having "..deeply divided, dark green foliage that changes to red in autumn or if dry. .. in June and July bear masses of large, 11/2 in. wide3, flowers of an intense colour…blooms are rosy-purple"
'Vision Pink' Accepted name G. sanguineum Chiltern seeds young plants, UK, 2004 b
'Vital' Accepted name G. x magnificum (?G. ibericum) Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2000 Believed to have been raised by Hans Simon in Germany.  Described as being "...drought resistant, with many, dark violet flowers".
'Vorjura' Accepted name x cantabrigiense Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 Listed and also in field trials list from Chicago Botanic Gardens.   A standard G. x cantabrigiense with mid-pink flowers, netted with white veins and a white centre.
'Wagenigen' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Hillside Cottage Plants, UK, 1997 Misspelt: See G. 'Wageningen'.
'Wageningen' Accepted name G. endressii (or G. x oxonianum) "Géranium Vivaces", 1997 A cultivar that is similar to G. Wargrave Pink', but with more intensely coloured flowers and a more compact growth habit.
'Wakehurst' Rejected name G. libani Synonym of  G. 'Kew Gardens'
'Walkre' Accepted name G. phaeum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 1999 Raised by nurseryman Christian Kress in Austria and named after the Wagner opera.  Described by him as "A vigorous seedling with light green leaves, reaching about 60 cms.  It has light blue flowers.  The leaves are similar to G. phaeum 'album', but without markings."
'Walter Ingwersen' Accepted name G. renardii RHS Journal, 103, p69 (1978) Collected by Walter Ingwersen, Salfedar & Zei, Caucasus, 1935. A white flowered form of the species, with violet veins.  Now a name of doubtful value as we are uncertain as to which plant it refers.
'Walter Ingwersen' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of cultivar name. See G. 'Ingwersen's Variety'.  
'Walter's Gift' Accepted name G. x oxonianum G. versicolor Cally Gardens, UK, 1989 Found in and named after Mary Ramsdale's garden in Essex, where the seedling was found.
'Wanneri' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Clifton, 1979 Plant seen at RBG Edinburgh which, according to Yeo, 1985, were not the same as var. wanneri herbarium samples.
'Wargrave' Rejected name G. endressii Clifton, 1979 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Wargrave PInk'
'Wargrave Pink' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Waterer, son & Crisp Nursery, UK, 1930 Nursery seedling, found by Mr G. W. Wright of Waterer, Son & Crisp, 1928.  RHS AGM to be reconsidered at next trial in 2012.  Described as having "flowers coloured pink 65A, dimensions 60cms x 140cms, flowering mid-May to early October."
'Wargrave Variety' Rejected name G. endressii Yeo, 1985 Invalid form of cultivar name.  See G. 'Wargrave Pink'
'Waystradi' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Coombland Gardens, UK 1996 Misspelt: See G. 'Waystrode'.
'Waystrode' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Coombland Gardens, UK, 1992 Garden origin, Waystrode Manor, Cowden, Kent, from garden owned by Mr & Mrs Peter Wright.  Often offered under the invalid name 'Waystradi'.  Flower very pale-pink to white, with veining.
'Welsh Guinness' Accepted name G. suzukii G. sessiliflorum 'Nigricans' Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 Raised by Alan Bremner and named and marketed by Crûg Farm Plants.  Described as "..a low-growing plant with long, creeping brown-leafed stems covered with a froth of small white flowers for most of the summer."
'Weltenbummler' Accepted name G. Crûg Strain (G. x antipodeum) Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 1999 A seedling raised by nurseryman Christian Kress in Austria.  Described by him as "Nearly black leaves with a little dark red in them and light pink flowers.  Flowers over a long period until the first frosts.  About 15 cms high."
'Wengen' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Bath & Jones, 1994 Working name prior to assignment of Cultivar Name: see G. 'Baker's Pink'
'Westacre Poppet' Accepted name G. sanguineum Plantsman's Preference nursery, UK, 2004/5 A cultivar from John Tuit of Westacre Gardens.  Described as being "Tiny plants bear(ing) deep purplish red flowers. 15cms tall".
'Westray' CPVO; USPP Accepted name G. x cantabrigiense CPVO, 2002 Raised by Alan Bremner and named after the Orkney island from which Alan's father came. A hybrid of G. 'Lohfelden' and G. dalmaticum.  Described as having "..clear pink flowers and foliage with a spicy aroma".  CPVO rights issued 9th September, 2002 under grant number 10036 and US Plant Patent PP13716 issued April 2003. 
'Weystrode' Rejected name G. x oxonianum Coombland Gardens, UK 1996 Misspelt: See G. 'Waystrode'. 
'White Lady' Accepted name G. pratense Piet Oudolf Nursery, Holland, 1992/3 Garden seedling raised by A. Walsweer.  Said to be much shorter than the species.
'White Lady' Rejected name G. versicolor Axletree Nursery, UK, 1993 In breach of article 17.1 of the Cultivated Code: duplicated name with denomination class. See G. 'Snow White'. 
'White Leaf' Rejected name G. nodosum Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 Misspelt: See G. 'Whiteleaf'.
'White Stripes' Accepted name G. x oxonianum f. thurstonianum Geranium Register, Version 3, 2008 A plant from Robin Moss of Hexham, Northumberland.  Described as being "a G. 'Thurstonianum' type plant, with pure white petals and flowers."
'White Zigana' Accepted name G. ibericum subsp. jubatum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 1998 Collected in Zigana Pass, Turkey, by Michael Baron of Alresford, Hampshire.  White, veined flowers.
'Whitehaven' Accepted name G. x oxonianum HGG Newsletter, Spring 2001 A garden seedling found by Mrs Jean Purkiss in her garden at Whitehaven, Cumbria, and described as being "..similar in form to G. x oxonianum  'Hollywood', but with larger and paler flowers".
'Whiteknights' Accepted name G. renardii GGN, 44, 1991/2 From wild collected seed raised by Reading University and named after their Botanic Garden.  This cultivar has blue flowers.
'Whiteleaf' Accepted name G. nodosum Monksilver Nursery, UK, 1992 Raised by the late Lionel Bacon, past President of the Alpine Garden Society, from repeatedly selecting seedlings over a course of years and named after his garden.
'Whiteness' Rejected name G. macrorrhizum Misspelt: See G. 'White-Ness'
'White-Ness' Accepted name G. macrorrhizum Crûg Farm Plants, UK, 1997 Collected from Mount Olympus, by members of Ness Botanic Garden.  Described as "Mat forming, compact and vigorous, 45 x 100cm wide. Leaves 8.5 x 9cm wide, Greyish Yellow Green 147B. White, single flowers held well above foliage, to 2cm, petals overlapping, flat. Long drooping anthers, white filament and golden yellow stamens. Flowering prolifically, with numerous small flowers, from 25.5.06 to 28.6.06, peaking during the first to third weeks of June."  Entered by Lodge Lane Nursery & Gardens, Dutton, Cheshire into the RHS Wisley Hardy Geranium Trials Stage 3 2004-6 where it was awarded an AGM.
'Whiter Shade of Pale' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geranium Register version 3, 2008 A plant from the garden of Robin Moss of Hexam, Northumberland.  Described as being "Similar to the normal G. x oxonianum in structure, but having flowers that are just off-white with a hint of the palest pink".
'Winscombe' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Washfield Nusery, UK, 1974 Found in a cottage garden in Winscombe, Somerset, by Margery Fish.
'Winston Churchill' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 Raised by Heinz Klöse, Lohfelden, Germany.  Described as "..a typical x oxonianum but with dark pink flowers and a slow growth habit."
'Wisley' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geranium Register version 4, 2012 Described as having "Rather large flowers of a petunia pink colour with darker veins."
'Wisley Blue' Accepted name G. pratense Rosies Gardens Plants, UK, 1998. Originally from RHS Wisley many years ago and mentioned in Clifton, 1979. Reintroduced by Croftway Nursery, Barnham, 1988. Described as  having large wedgewood blue flowers with some red veining from June to August.  Deeply divided leaves. 100cms tall.
'Wisley Hybrid' Rejected name G. sanguineum x ?G. wlassovianum Working name prior to assignment of cultivar name:  See G. 'Khan'.
'Wisley Jewel' Accepted name G. wallichianum 'Syarbru' G. wallichianum 'Buxton's Variety' "RHS Bicentenary Year of Gardening Programme of Events", 2004 A plant launched as part of the RHS bi-centenary celebrations in 2004. Allan Robinon crossed these two cultivars and produced a range of seedlings.  Some looked lik G. 'Syabru', but others were pink.  These were originally planted out on the rock garden at Wisley under the name G. w. Pink Form.  One form was subsequently chosen as this cultivar.  All pers. comm ex AR.  It has lasting flowers of a deep mauve-pink colour, fading to white in the centre, with pale veining.  It has a spreading habit.
'Wisley Variety' Rejected name G. x magnificum In breach of Article 17.15 of the Cultivated Code:  Use of the term 'Variety'. In addition, a published description has not been found.  The name has been applied to one of the G. x magnificum clones previously unamed: David Hibberd pers comm. 
'Wit met Lila' Rejected name G. sylvaticum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Invalid as purely adjectival.  No replacement name assigned.
'Witoscha' Undetermined name G. macrorrhizum       A cultivar that circulated in German and eastern Europe. Thought to have been collected by the eminent biologist Karl Partsch. If so, it was probably collected from the famous massif located near Sofia, Bulgaria. Published description not found.
'Wreighburn House White' Accepted name G. nodosum HGG Newsletter, Autumn 2012 Found in the garden of this house in Thropton, Northumberland by Cyril Foster.  Described as being "..much more vigorous (than G. 'Silverwood') and grows to a height of 2' 6" i.e. 3 to 4 times the height.  Possibly a seedling of G. 'Svelte Lilac', as there were no plants of G. 'Silverwood' in the garden.  It is said to seed try throughout the garden.
'Yorkshire Queen' Accepted name G. pratense Axletree Nursery, UK, 1995?  Found by Robin Moss, Hexham, Northumberland in a nursery being sold under the erroneous name G. 'Silver Queen'.  A huge plant reaching 1.20m under good conditions, with white flowers, veined purple.
'Zartrosa' Accepted name G. sanguineum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Described as being "Similar to G. sanguineum var. striatum.  A trailing plant with light pink flowers with pink veins.  Height 20cms.  Flowering June - September."
'Zellertal' Accepted name G. wlassovianum Sarastro Nursery, Austria, 2001 Raised by Herr Probst, Arnbruck, Germany.  Described as "..typical G. wlassovianum but with very large, purple violet flowers."
'Zena Grant' Accepted name G. x oxonianum Geraniumboekje, 2012 Found in the cottage garden of Mrs Zena Grant, Kypp Cottage, Biddenden, Kent, as a potted seedling and, on his request, given to Rein ten Klooster when he visited the garden in 1992.  Described as having "Marrpw [eta;s wotj a brogjt [oml cp;pir/  Jeogjt 40 cms. flowering June - August." Being marketed by Mensuma Nursery in Remie Pama, North Netherlands.
'Zetterlund' Accepted name G. renardii Blooms of Bressingham, UK, 1995 Collected on Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus, by Henrik Zetterlund, Gothenburg BG.  Similar to G. 'Whiteknights', but flowers are pale reddish-purple, with violet stems.
'Zit Factory' Accepted name G. phaeum "The Plantsman", vol. 6 (3), p.161, 2007 A plant from Monksilver nursery in Cambridgeshire, England.  It arose in the 1980's.  It is rarely offered and is not an inspiring plant.  It was named after it habit of producing leaves with small pustule-like eruptions on the surface.
'Zlatko' Undetermined name Name listed.  Published description not found.